T - Wagons And Water Buffaloes

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Sabata12

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Philly
It's a thought I've had as of late. I've seen all matter of big T-wagons that people strap on the back of their RV's. Makes sense if you use state parks, where a full hook-up can be hard to find.
But what about bringing water to your RV? I find that my Motorhome's fresh water tank will last one weekend, but no more. Not a problem as that's when I unplug and head to the dump station. But what if you want to spend a solid week at a electricity-only campsite? A T-wagon is one way to haul your waste out.
What's the best way to bring water to your RV? Are there companies that haul water trucks around and fill-up your tank? I suppose you could unplug and drive to the nearest dump station because most of them have potable water spigots not far away. But that defeats the purpose of a T - wagon.
Suggestions?
 
I carry two fold up food grade water bladders in the storage compartment in the back of my jeep along with a water pump and hose.

The water pump also serves as a backup replacement in case I need it for the RV.

One of the water bladders is 50 gallons and the other is 25 gallons.

When empty, they fold flat and take up almost no room.

Here is a link to the bladders.



I have a hidden 2,000 cubic inch compartment in the rear of my Jeep Commander with MREs and all sorts of survival gear. Never use it but have it.

I removed the third row seats.
 

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It's a thought I've had as of late. I've seen all matter of big T-wagons that people strap on the back of their RV's. Makes sense if you use state parks, where a full hook-up can be hard to find.
But what about bringing water to your RV? I find that my Motorhome's fresh water tank will last one weekend, but no more. Not a problem as that's when I unplug and head to the dump station. But what if you want to spend a solid week at a electricity-only campsite? A T-wagon is one way to haul your waste out.
What's the best way to bring water to your RV? Are there companies that haul water trucks around and fill-up your tank? I suppose you could unplug and drive to the nearest dump station because most of them have potable water spigots not far away. But that defeats the purpose of a T - wagon.
Suggestions?
It's been my experience that dump station and potable water are mutually exclusive concepts. Having a potable water hose in the vicinity of a dump station + that 1 in 1000 RV owner who is going to clean his black tank by shoving the hose back through the line is not good math. At the few parks I've visited that didn't have water or sewer at the site the potable water station was at a different location from the dump station. Time you get through mucking around filling your rig from a portable tank or bladder you could have unplugged and made a run to the water station five times.
 
I carry two fold up food grade water bladders in the storage compartment in the back of my jeep along with a water pump and hose.

The water pump also serves as a backup replacement in case I need it for the RV.

One of the water bladders is 50 gallons and the other is 25 gallons.

When empty, they fold flat and take up almost no room.

Here is a link to the bladders.



I have a hidden 2,000 cubic inch compartment in the rear of my Jeep Commander with MREs and all sorts of survival gear. Never use it but have it.

I removed the third row seats.
Thanks. Hadn't thought about a bladder. I'll look into it.
 
It's been my experience that dump station and potable water are mutually exclusive concepts. Having a potable water hose in the vicinity of a dump station + that 1 in 1000 RV owner who is going to clean his black tank by shoving the hose back through the line is not good math. At the few parks I've visited that didn't have water or sewer at the site the potable water station was at a different location from the dump station. Time you get through mucking around filling your rig from a portable tank or bladder you could have unplugged and made a run to the water station five times.
Now that you mention it, most of the state parks I've used have the potable water station a distance from the dump station, which I assume is for the reason you mentioned. One of the frustrating things are potable water spigots located throughout the campsite. Hard to locate and you block traffic filling up your fresh water tank.
 
Now that you mention it, most of the state parks I've used have the potable water station a distance from the dump station, which I assume is for the reason you mentioned. One of the frustrating things are potable water spigots located throughout the campsite. Hard to locate and you block traffic filling up your fresh water tank.
I usually filled water tank before leaving house and then used 6-gallon water jug to refill if needed.
 
We use a small folding bladder and a Harbor Freight pump to get it into our tank. Doesn't take long and is much less hassle than having to put everything away and hook up trailer etc.
 
Our Pace Arrow has a 58 gallon grey and 47 gallon black tank. When boon docking, we dump dish water in the black tank. We also catch the vanity water with a plastic bowl and dump that in the black tank. It's probably only a few gallons but we have never needed to dump for at least a week.
 
The specs say you have a fifty gallon fresh water tank on a Freelander 31B. If so that should last you a weekend without problems. Even 2 people should be able to go a 3 day weekend without worry. In a motorhome you have to use water differently than at a place with unlimited water.
You also have to take Navy showers. If the OP doesn’t know what they are just ask.
 
The specs say you have a fifty gallon fresh water tank on a Freelander 31B. If so that should last you a weekend without problems. Even 2 people should be able to go a 3 day weekend without worry. In a motorhome you have to use water differently than at a place with unlimited water.
Yes, but I'm looking into camping a week plus in the future. And in state campgrounds.
 
The first "real" trip in our class A was to Quartzsite, as boondock as you're going to get. We were off grid for 9 days and still had about 10 gallons left (60 gallon tank). We had also brought a few gallon jugs of drinking water but we were both impressed with each other's efforts to economize, and it worked. No question it's better when you don't have to worry about it but when you're faced with hauling and storing hundreds of pounds of water or having to pull up stakes to fill or dump, it's not hard to conserve.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 
I'll stick it here, but you will see this pop up in other threads eventually. This is what has to be the worlds largest dump station. You enter thru a gate on the far side (where that little building is in the distance on the left) and come to a large (no, huge) section of asphalt with lanes painted on it. It would be easy to line up four or five RV's waiting at each lane of the dump station. It is perfectly sloped for good drainage from the RV and has the water line on the upright pole with the flex spring in the middle and an air gap device on top with a hose. Potable water is the last thing at the exit end of the lane. Yes, I am pulled in backwards (truck on the right) as I dumped then needed to get potable water and my fill is on the right, so I pulled out, did a U turn and back in again. there is also a lot of room on the far left and right for vehicles to bypass the lanes if they so chose. Never seen one set up like this before.

Peninsula State Park, in Door County Wisconsin. Said to be the busiest park in the state. Campsites were overgrown and horrible, like being in a jungle, and the bath houses had not been cleaned in years (official excuse, "we are tearing them down and gong to rebuild them in 2025")

CharlesWorlds largest dump station.jpg

Close up of cropped section of above image. My buddy is doing a black tank flush with the green hose. The black stanchions are no glare downward lighting, we drove by once after dark and they did a good job of illuminating the area.
Close up of worlds largest dump station.jpg
 
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We have always had travel trailers towed with pick-up trucks and now a fifth wheel. I carry a 35 gallon fresh water tank and a water transfer pump and have been using this for about 20 years now. I'm on my 3rd water pump. The water pump is 120 volt, but I keep a 400 watt inverter in my pick-up that drives the pump quite well if we do not have electricity. The tank is 35 gallons, and it stows away nicely in my front storage area of the fifth wheel. Before that, I carried it in the bed of my pick-up truck. This works very, very well, especially since about 99.9% of our camping experience has been on State Park campsites that did not have water at the campsite.


 
Now that you mention it, most of the state parks I've used have the potable water station a distance from the dump station, which I assume is for the reason you mentioned. One of the frustrating things are potable water spigots located throughout the campsite. Hard to locate and you block traffic filling up your fresh water tank.
Yes I’ve experienced this. Blocking traffic when filling up with fresh water in state parks.
 
Our onboard 65 gallon fresh tank typically lasts my wife and I 7 to 10 days depending in part on the weather and the proximity of the park's shower facilities. Hotter weather, more showers of course. When needed, we have two 7 gallon water jugs, plus a couple of 2-1/2 gallon jugs. We fill them at the nearest potable spigot and then pump them into the onboard tank via a three port valve and short hose I added that lets us use the onboard pump for filling the tank. We also carry 200 feet of hose that sometimes lets us reach a park spigot without leaving our site. Fortunately for us, our favorite site at our favorite NY state park has a water spigot at our site, reachable with a 25' hose.
 
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