Tandem axle shift/twist during sharp turns

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Poppie's RV

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Dec 2, 2022
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Virginia
I have noticed my tandem axle trailer wheels (Dexter) seem to tilt or flex after making sharp turns like when pulling into a gas station or other place with relatively sharp turns. The wheels always return to the original (normal) position after riding a few minutes. Just wondering if this is a common situation or should I be worried. I included a couple photos of the wheels.
 

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Krazeehorse33

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Kenton Ohio
i would at least jack the rig up and check your wheel bearings. You may be good. There are much more experienced people on here that will chime in soon.
 

Utclmjmpr

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Cedar City, UT
When turning with tandem axles you are twisting the wheels in opposite directions,, the axles are actually shifting to one side or the other ( on the springs due to the applied leverage) for a few moments until you go straight for awhile and it shifts back into normal alignment..>>>Dan
 
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CharlesinGA

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Yep, thats the tires flexing. As Krazeehorse33 noted, you might check the bearings but if you jack up a wheel and shake it and you do not detect any perceptible movement, and it spins smoothly, there is no problem. I am retired from an airline. Well, airliners, especially large ones, have tandem wheels, what is called a four wheel truck on each landing gear. I watched a tug driver/mechanic spin a 767 around 180 degrees on the hangar ramp at max turn angle, and you would have thought the tires were going to pop off the rims. I think several of us said something to him about that afterward.

Its hard on the tires, probably moves the belts in the tire around, and its certainly best to avoid tight turns for the tires sake (and depending on your hitch, the hitch's sake too)

Charles
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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You didn't mention the type of suspension on that trailer. A flex-rubber suspension like the MorRyde lets the wheels tilt (camber) at what may look like impossible angles. Torsion suspensions less so, but still noticeable. And as others have already explained, the traditional spring and shackle arrangement still bends the tire sideways in a tight turn.
 

Lou Schneider

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It's normal, as others have said due to sideways scrubbing on the tires during a sharp turn. It's only a problem if you let them sit that way for any length of time. For example, by stopping in the middle of a turn while backing into a campsite. In this case, just pull the trailer straight ahead for a few feet and then back up in a straight line to let the tires equalize themselves before settling in for the night.
 

Ray-IN

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Mar 16, 2014
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North America-somewhere
That normal action is exactly why ST =special trailer tires have thicker and stiffer sidewalls than LT or P tires and are highly recommended to run sidewall listed air pressure. Matter of fact, Carlisle ST Tire warranty used to state if their tires were not operated at sidewall maximum the warranty was void.
Many years ago in E. TX town of Van, I watched a man make a U-turn on a blacktop city street in July.
One of his 5er tires rolled so much it broke the bead seal, which naturally resulted in a flat tire.
 
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