The 30 amp tethering plug needs replacing

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bobbottman

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The plug to tether our Winnebago Minnie to AC power needs replacing. The blades are badly pitted and one has lost its tip. I'm daunted by the size of the cable I'd have to cut and prep for a replacement plug. Any tips on doing this?
 

John From Detroit

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i know the job looks daunting but turns out it's easy. Do the initial cut with a hacksaw close as you can to the plub body. then standard practice insulation removal. Wires should be color coded. (NOTE SHOULD no guarantees there)
 

SeilerBird

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I used this video a while ago to replace the 30 amp plug of a TT I used to own. It's literally this easy!
Horrible video. You should never put stranded wire onto a plug like that, he should be using lugs like this:
Lugs.jpg


and installed with a pressure tool. But actually I would not even replace the plug. I would (and I did) buy a new cord with molded plugs and outlets.

If you install the plug like the video did there is no way you can get enough torque on the screwdriver to make a really solid connection that will not end up shaking itself loose and causing a bigger problem.
 
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uchu

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Horrible video. You should never put stranded wire onto a plug like that, he should be using lugs like this:
View attachment 149851


and installed with a pressure tool. But actually I would not even replace the plug. I would (and I did) buy a new cord with molded plugs and outlets.

If you install the plug like the video did there is no way you can get enough torque on the screwdriver to make a really solid connection that will not end up shaking itself loose and causing a bigger problem.
I can see your point. Yes, that'd be safer, providing the inserted wires fit snuggly in the crimp connectors and you squeeze them properly.

I personally just hook the wires around the screws, clockwise, so the screw in motion will make them even more "hooked" around to the terminal. Never had problems doing this, but I suppose the more secure, the better.
 

SeilerBird

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I can see your point. Yes, that'd be safer, providing the inserted wires fit snuggly in the crimp connectors and you squeeze them properly.

I personally just hook the wires around the screws, clockwise, so the screw in motion will make them even more "hooked" around to the terminal. Never had problems doing this, but I suppose the more secure, the better.
A while back someone here almost burnt their RV down because of a sloppy job installing a plug. The main problem with doing it without a crimp is that you cannot tighten the screws tight enough without jamming the screwdriver into your hand.
 

donn

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Burnt plug blades? HUMMM. And no one picked up on this? Shame on Y'all. Thats caused by hot plugging. People should ALWAYS ALWAYS turn off the breaker on the pedistal before connecting.
 

silversport

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The plug to tether our Winnebago Minnie to AC power needs replacing. The blades are badly pitted and one has lost its tip. I'm daunted by the size of the cable I'd have to cut and prep for a replacement plug. Any tips on doing this?
I am assuming you have a 30 amp male plug that needs replacing. It's just like a 15 amp cord, three wires black (power), white (neutral), green (ground) (that is if no ones messed with it), wire size is 10 gauge instead of 14 gauge. Buy plug, cut wire to diagram length, screw to together.
 
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Lou Schneider

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I used this video a while ago to replace the 30 amp plug of a TT I used to own. It's literally this easy.
Horrible video. You should never put stranded wire onto a plug like that, he should be using lugs like this:
I suggest getting a genuine Camco plug. The wire clamps are different than the ones in that video, they are designed to be used with stranded wire and have a groove to hold the straight end of the wire in place. You just insert the wire into the groove and tighten the screw. It's securely held in place so the strands won't fan out like they would if you wrapped the wire around the screw. A small but important improvement.

https://www.amazon.com/Camco-PowerGrip-Replacement-Durable-55245/dp/B000PGXQNC/

The main problem with doing it without a crimp is that you cannot tighten the screws tight enough without jamming the screwdriver into your hand.
Watch the Camco video on the Amazon page to see how to install the plug. You leave the lugs partially inserted into the plug body to hold them in place while you firmly tighten the screws so you're not screwing directly into your hand.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I'm with silversport - this is not a huge challenge. If you can change a plug at home, you can do this. Yes, be careful to get the wires under the screws and tightened down. You may be able to get wire ends on the wires or solder them to make the fit to the terminal screws easier & better quality, but it's not a firm requirement.

Camco has a short video on installing a new plug head, but it avoids the problem of removing the old head. A large heavy-bladed knife can be used to hack it off, but a hacksaw is usually easier. A fine toth saw blade works easier than a coarse one.

The pros will tell you everything you can do wrong and how terrible the plug instructions are, but the vast majority of amateurs replace their plugs without problems. Rudimentary care is sufficient.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Burnt plug blades? HUMMM. And no one picked up on this? Shame on Y'all. Thats caused by hot plugging. People should ALWAYS ALWAYS turn off the breaker on the pedistal before connecting.
Not always, though that's a common cause. The slots on the RV park pedestal are often worn, dirty or pitted and that will cause damage to the blades on the plug. Another common cause is continuous operation at peak amperage. These plugs are rated for 30A peak but only 80% of that continuous (30 minutes or more). Some of the better grade plugs can handle a continuous 30A, but many of them get hot and show signs of burning or melted insulation if 24A is exceeded for a more than 20-30 minutes. That can easily occur on a 30A system if the a/c (s) are running, water heater on electric, fridge cooling on electric, etc. It's not hard to draw 25A in an RV.
 

Rene T

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Burnt plug blades? HUMMM. And no one picked People should ALWAYS ALWAYS turn off the breaker on the pedistal before connecting.And also disconnecting. This will put the pedistal breaker in the correct position when the next guy plugs in.
People should ALWAYS ALWAYS turn off the breaker on the pedistal before connecting.
And disconnecting. This will will put the breaker in the correct position for when the next camper plugs in. Wouldn’t it be nice if everyone did this.
 

Rob&Deryl

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Well, if you are capable, a neat solder job on the ends would be good.
NO!
It is never ok to use solder in any mechanical compression connection. It is expressly forbidden in the NEC (National Electric Codej because solder, when compressed, will flow leaving a loose connection that will overheat and maybe burn.

The crimp similar to what Seiler Bird showed is terrific if it fits the application. A proper crimp does the job reliably.
 

phil-t

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Was not particularly referring to the crimp connector - never mind!

The NEC does allow soldering: 110.14B: Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the use OR by brazing, welding, or soldering with a fusible metal alloy. Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be MECHANICALLY and electrically secure without solder and then soldered.
 

Rene T

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I purchased a outdoor flood light the other day and the first 1/4” of all three wires where soldered. Maybe that was justo keep the wires from fraying.
 

IBTripping

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I replaced my 30amp plug in with a high quality replacement. Directions came with the new plug. It was easy peasy.
 
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