Those PC optimizer programs

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TheBar

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Most accessory programs just have a cute interface to execute a Windows command that does the same thing. For instance most clean-up programs do the same thing as right clicking on a hard drive in Windows Explorer, selecting Properties, then clicking on the button labeled "Disk Cleanup". Running these built-in Windows commands is generally pretty safe but there could be times a program is affected. But safer than using any 3rd party software. Also type "apps" in the search bar and delete things you don't use anymore.

Windows takes care of most things but there are still some things it doesn't do automatically. If you've ever noticed Windows runs like a striped ape when first installed. Then as years go by it gets slower and slower until most people buy a new computer to speed things up. One of the reasons is most programs nowadays run a service to remind you when a new update is available. I disable the services I know I don't need or want. Another issue is the size of the registry which is not a relational database but more like a text list. The bigger it gets the slower it gets and causes bluescreens and errors. Uninstalling a program does not usually clean it up and I've never found a native Windows to clean it up. Use at your own risk but I've used a free one called "Eusing Free Registry Cleaner" for almost 20 years without a problem. Once you get 300 or more obsolete entries you start to see a slowdown. I've tried others like CCleaner which found zero then Eusing found 63 immediately afterwards.
 

Ex-Calif

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It's beginning to look like there isn't anybody who needs an optimizer program.

-Don- Reno, NV
As Gary and theBar (and others) have said Windows has been getting more and more self sufficient. Whether you think it's evil genius or what, Microsoft figured out they needed to be more like a corporate network manager and fix things remotely and automatically.

Think how many tech calls they avoid compared to Win 7.

There are still things one can do "on their own." background programs being one of the biggest issues.

Another issue to check - My kid complained his 2 y/o computer was slow, crashing and he was getting disk space warnings. I took a look.

The craziest thing - He had a 2 TB HDD and the packager made a 500gb Drive C and a 1.5TB drive D. Of course Windows had all storage set up on Drive C.

My kid had no idea he had 1.5 TB of unused space - LOL...

BTW, Don - You haven't told us what PC, OS or problem you might have.
 

DonTom

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You haven't told us what PC, OS or problem you might have.
All my computers (several) run Win10.

This one (copied from System-About):

Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU J1900 @ 1.99GHz 1.99 GHz
8.00 GB (7.89 GB usable)
64-bit operating system, x64-based processor.


No problems that I am aware of. I just keep on seeing advertisements for those optimizer programs and I wondered if they did anything useful.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

Lou Schneider

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My system is similar to DonTom's . It's in a HP Win 10 Home Edition laptop I bought off the floor at Walmart for $300.

The 128gb solid state drive lets it boot from a cold start in less than 10 seconds and it does everything I need.

Device name LAPTOP
Processor 11th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-1115G4 @ 3.00GHz 3.00 GHz
Installed RAM 4.00 GB (3.65 GB usable)

Product ID 00356-02366-90819-AAOEM
System type 64-bit operating system, x64-based processor
 

DonTom

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My system is similar to DonTom's . It's in a HP Win 10 Home Edition laptop I bought off the floor at Walmart for $300.

The 128gb solid state drive lets it boot from a cold start in less than 10 seconds and it does everything I need.

Device name LAPTOP
Processor 11th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-1115G4 @ 3.00GHz 3.00 GHz
Installed RAM 4.00 GB (3.65 GB usable)

Product ID 00356-02366-90819-AAOEM
System type 64-bit operating system, x64-based processor
The laptop I used yesterday on my motorcycle ride to Lake Almanor, CA also came from Wal*Mart, but ordered on line and was delivered here in less than 24 hours.

Mine is a HP also (HP ENVY 13):

Processor 11th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-1115G7 @ 2.40 GHz 2.42 GHz
Installed RAM 8.00 GB (7.77 GB usable)
System type 64-bit operating system, x64-based processor
Product ID 00325-81951-48970-AAOEM


-Don- Reno, NV
 

Ex-Calif

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My system is similar to DonTom's . It's in a HP Win 10 Home Edition laptop I bought off the floor at Walmart for $300.

The 128gb solid state drive lets it boot from a cold start in less than 10 seconds and it does everything I need.

Device name LAPTOP
Processor 11th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-1115G4 @ 3.00GHz 3.00 GHz
Installed RAM 4.00 GB (3.65 GB usable)

Product ID 00356-02366-90819-AAOEM
System type 64-bit operating system, x64-based processor
All my computers (several) run Win10.

This one (copied from System-About):

Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU J1900 @ 1.99GHz 1.99 GHz
8.00 GB (7.89 GB usable)
64-bit operating system, x64-based processor.


No problems that I am aware of. I just keep on seeing advertisements for those optimizer programs and I wondered if they did anything useful.

-Don- Reno, NV

In today's PCs performance boils (primarily) down to RAM and SSD drives. Processors and clock speeds are all similar unless you are doing something high end.

Price reflects HDD and RAM. 8gb is fine for eMail and web surfing but as soon as you start crunching numbers or working with large files it is limiting. 32gb of Ram is a minimum for most modern good quality video editing software.

And that is because cheap camera technology makes high quality video more common and these files get big fast.

My kid just became a video editor. He had a small company we started this year as a videographer and he works in 4k RAW video. His laptop almost immediately became a stumbling block. When he got the job doing commercial editing (to make ends meet and to learn high end editing) it was unsustainable.

We ended up getting him a "gamers" spec desktop. Lots of RAM, video RAM and a 2tb SSD. He would have preferred a laptop but the desktop, spec for spec, was 1/3 the price.

For those wondering - If he works in the office they have a high end machine for him. However one of the beauties of the job is the editors can work remote but have to supply their own home based gear.
 
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Don, looks like you got your answer regarding the optimizer programs, they are mostly malware and will do more harm than good. CCleaner used to be a great tool for cleanup, but they too have gotten into the spyware business and do more tracking then cleaning now.

Heli_, Win7 is no longer supported by Microsoft, and your browsers were always vulnerable to attacks, same with any Windows products including Win10. Best option is a paid for anti malware anti virus. Free products are only as good as what you paid for them. Webroot has personally and for clients never let me down. My 2 cents
 

DonTom

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In today's PCs performance boils (primarily) down to RAM and SSD drives. Processors and clock speeds are all similar unless you are doing something high end.
And perhaps a few other things, like this HP-13 laptop I am now using from a restaurant. Very thin, handy to take on my motorcycles and I think this is the best fastest computer I have ever owned. I cannot stand to use my old laptops after using this one.

Wasn't cheap, it cost me $700.00 when I purchased it, but worth every penny, IMO.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

TheBar

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Not only is Win 7 no longer supported but Win 11 will be released tomorrow, Oct 5. Some people may be forced to buy a new PC by 2025 when Win 10 will no longer be supported. I thought they said Win 10 would be the last operating system :(

The biggest gotcha is Win 11 requires the TPM security chip. Most computers released within the past 3 years should have TPM 2.0. Some older machines might have TPM, but TPM 1.2. In those cases, the TPM firmware needs an update to 2.0. But the average person can't/won't change the BIOS settings and some computers can't be upgraded to 2.0.
 

DonTom

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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
Win 10 will no longer be supported.
I don't see any big reason to care if Win10 is supported or not. It has been working well for me as is and I see not reason to even try Win11.

Somebody once mentioned how every other version of Windows is junk. Such as:

Win XP-good
Win Vista-junk
Win7- good
Win 8-junk
(was there ever a Windows 9?)
Win 10=good.

So expect Win 11 to be junk . . .

-Don- Reno, NV
 

TheBar

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I don't see any big reason to care if Win10 is supported or not.
Because most people use a PC until it breaks. Win 11 is the first version that restricts by age instead of by processor/memory speeds. Win 7 was supported twice as long after Win 10 was released.
 

Ex-Calif

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The question is what does "supported" mean and is there an "obligation."

Anyone who lived through the late 80's and 90's remembers "having" to upgrade the processor and memory each time MS came out with a new windows and software became more "needy." - Pretty much intel and MS were "in cahoots" on this business model.

With today's price point I don't expect any PC to be relevant after about 3-4 years. Most people totally overbuy for what they need. 90% of people are doing web surfing, eMail and TurboTax. Anything above a Chrome book is unnecessary, except I (personally) demand a HDD to store my data on locally.

I got mad when my "gen 1" iPad stopped getting support. But I eventually faced the fact that the software guys wanted more features/power/whatever and a new OS was eventually needed. I can still read books on my old iPad but that's about it...
 

Larry N.

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Anything above a Chrome book is unnecessary,
For SOME people that seems to be true, but only for SOME people. For instance I can't do complex video processing or flight simming on a Chrome book, nor can I do desktop publishing -- my DTP program (Pagestream) is compatible back to my Amiga -- without big annual bucks for MS online version or Word, or whatever it is now.

And I WON'T store pictures online. So the Chr Bk won't work for people like me.
 

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