Took the plunge! Have questions

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scale obsession

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Jun 3, 2018
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139
I've been hanging around this forum for a good bit of time, and done a ton of research. We finally took the plunge. We haven't taken delivery yet, but will in the next few weeks. We picked out a 2019 rockwood 2509s.Currently processing paperwork and waiting to do our PDI.  As with anything, there is always a ton of extras, supplies and trinkets available. What are some must have goodies? Anything you absolutely can't live without? Any words of wisdom?
 

Larry N.

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May 26, 2010
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9,137
Location
Westminster, Colorado
Since you've been around the forum for a while, you may have seen this before, but spend a night or two living in the RV in your driveway, or in a nearby park, and you'll discover lots of things you wish you had. Of course you need sewer hose and water hose and propane in the tank, and stuff for the kitchen, depending on how you operate (some people need more stuff than others). You may discover that you want a portable generator for times when you don't have electric to plug in to, but that should wait until you've been out a time or three.

If you haven't already perused our library (link near top of page) then you can find all kinds of useful info there, including a variety of checklists.
 

Conquest2011

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Sep 4, 2011
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213
Location
Cumberland, Maryland
Get your wallet out.

Get yourself a good water pressure regulator, the kind you can adjust with pressure gauge.

If you really like soft water like I do, then get yourself a portable water softener.

EMS Electrical Management System. Either portable or permanent EMS to protect your RV from faulty electric service and surge protection.

If your rig is 50 AMP system then pick a 50 AMP adapter for 30 AMP receptacle, not all parks are 50 AMP capable.

Something to think about, if you are camping in a park or a place that don't have Full Hook Up such as sewage, then I would consider a Blue Boy. This a portable tank that you use to empty the waste tanks in the RV. Get the appropriate size for your RV tanks.

Many RV Parks require a doughnut for the sewage connection, get one now so you don't have spend 10 bucks at the RV Park store.

DW and I are going full time this fall and our shopping list exceeds $12K. This includes everything from waste water and potable water transfer to Solar energy. We plan doing a lot of boon-docking.



 

Gizmo100

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Sep 28, 2018
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Go slow on that spending until you spend a night or two in the RV. You will need the basic stuff regarding water and sewer but make sure you know what you need before spending the money.

A good example...
I ran into a friend/fellow RV owner at Walmart in the RV isle right after we got our TT. He starts showing me all the stuff I will need.
We have replaced most of the stuff he recommended. While it may have worked for him it didn't work for us.

Some things I don't recommend..

The preset water Regulator......Spend the money and get the adjustable one
The leveling blocks....Save your money and make them out of wood. The wood works better and is safer in my opinion.

 

grashley

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May 7, 2015
Posts
6,591
Location
Western Kentucky
SeilerBird said:
My recommendation is to not buy anything until you need it. There is no reason to load up the RV with unnecessary weight and expenses.

BEST ADVISE  :))

With that said, there are several thing you WILL need.  Conquest had a good list. 
This list is a MUST and should come with the camper or be added immediately
Drain Hose
Potable water hose
Electric cord
Tire chocks

This is my "Insurance" list - things you hope you never need, but pay for themselves several times over if you ever do
Adjustable water pressure regulator ($35 up) Protect from high campground pressure
EMS ($75 up and up)  Protects from improper camp wiring, power surges and spikes, brownouts.
TPMS  ($250 up)  Tire issues before they blow and rip up the undercarriage.
CoachNet ($150? / yr) for the flat or breakdown

I would add nothing else without a specific identified need.  Your needs and mine will be different.  Camp in the driveway, and this list will write itself.

My list includes
Long neck propane lighter
Flash Lights
Lawn chairs
Coffee pot
Small bedroom fan
Toaster
Wall clock
50A -->30A plug  30A --> 50A plug  15A --> 30A plug
Grill
Hatchet
 

Hanr3

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Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Posts
392
Location
Central Illinois
Congrats on the purchase!

Many lists and items to choose. We all live differently and have different requirements from our gear. The basic list is the stuff you need to make your RV operational, which has been covered.

After that, it's all personal choice and based on how you live and plan to use the camper. Spending time in it in your driveway is the safest way to figure out what you NEED, and WANT. Those are two different lists. Evaluate the items on each of those lists carefully. As with anything, once you buy it, you will hang onto it far too long. Especially if there is the one-in-a-million chance that you may need it. Buy only what you need. Get some time under your experience belt before you buy items on the want list. That list will change dramatically after you get comfortable with the camper and develop a routine.

My big challenge was storage for items on the basic list? I made storage areas for my fresh water hose, black tank flush hose, power cord, power extension cord, power protection, sewer hoses & couplings, rubber gloves, water pressure regulator, leveling blocks, water bladder, tire chocks, 5 gallon bucket, black tank treatment tablets, etc.
I made a list of the basic items that will work for my camper and went to Gander Outdoors. It's about the only store locally that sells RV gear. Anyway, they were having a sale, and also having a Good Sam sign-up event where they gave additional percentage off my purchase. I bought almost everything I needed on the basic list on sale, and because I joined Good Sam I got another 30% off. So I bought a couple of Zero-Gravity chairs, which where also on sale and discounted. Then I stopped at Lowe's and bought bike rack brackets to hang hoses, electrical cords, and tire chocks. Everything has a place and I know by looking if I forgot anything.

Happy shopping. Spend some time reaserching brands and products from te basic list!

Only item I over purchased to date, is a swerage hose. I bought a 15' Rhino hose and a 10' Rhino hose. I haven't used the 10' yet. I read a lot of storeis about sewage being further from the camper and needed more hose. Come to find out, I rarely camp in full hook up sites. 
 

lynnmor

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May 14, 2013
Posts
1,586
You should have a spare tire, jack and tools to change it.  A torque wrench with the proper socket(s) and extension would be best since you are to re-torque the lugnuts per your owners manual.
 

Rene T

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May 20, 2011
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19,492
Location
Farmington NH
Where this is all new to you, when you do your PDI, have a cell phone and do a video of everything they say and show you. You will be over whelmed that day and if you're lucky, you may only remember 10% of the walk through.

Things like raising and lowering the antenna and powering it up,
Cable TV connection point,
Water heater bypass and how to start the heater on electric and gas,
How to run the furnace and air conditioner,
How to level and stabilize the RV,
How to fill the fresh water tank and start the water pump,
How to use your black and gray water tanks and when and how to dump them and what sequence,
How to use your black water tank flusher if you have one,
How to use the toilet properly,
How to winterize the RV. Many of us just blow down the system with air. Contact us when you want to do it.
How to connect your sewer hose, water hose and power cord,
What electrical adapters you'll need just in case,
Hooking up and unhooking trailer from tow vehicle,
The importance of the electrical breakaway switch,
How to run the fridge on electric or gas,
Location of battery and how to maintain it,
Have them show you where the electrical converter is how it works,
What components run off 110 volt AC and the ones on 12 volt DC,
How to use the microwave,
Where are your smoke detector, carbon monoxide and LP detector and how they work,
Location of entrance panel and how it works,
How to extend the awning and when you should retract it,
Which windows are used to escape in a emergency,
How to check the roof seams for proper caulking and what type to use, vertical and horizontal,
How to use your propane tanks and how the automatic change over valve works,

These are some of the things they'll show you or should explain to you so you can see where taping the walk through is very important. Don't rely on your memory.
 

kdbgoat

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Apr 16, 2014
Posts
6,329
One thing that is a must for me is comfortable chairs  for outside.
 

Gizmo

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Joined
Apr 22, 2012
Posts
1,719
Location
Wherever we park it
Gizmo100 said:
Go slow on that spending until you spend a night or two in the RV. You will need the basic stuff regarding water and sewer but make sure you know what you need before spending the money.

A good example...
I ran into a friend/fellow RV owner at Walmart in the RV isle right after we got our TT. He starts showing me all the stuff I will need.
We have replaced most of the stuff he recommended. While it may have worked for him it didn't work for us.

Some things I don't recommend..

The preset water Regulator......Spend the money and get the adjustable one
The leveling blocks....Save your money and make them out of wood. The wood works better and is safer in my opinion.

I agree here with brother Gizmo, except for using wood for leveling blocks.  While wood works and many people do just that, there is a better option,  https://andersenhitches.com/Products/3604--camper-leveler.aspx 
Bar none these, while a bit pricey are the simplest, easiest and more accurate if you are a type A picky perfectionist like me, method of leveling.  These beat all  leveling blocks and wood.  If your rig has two axels, make sure to get two.

SeilerBird said:
My recommendation is to not buy anything until you need it. There is no reason to load up the RV with unnecessary weight and expenses.

Good advice for goodies or the extra niceties.  Indeed wait on those and find out what would really benefit you before taking the plunge.  However there are accessories that are a must have. 
1) If your dealer throws in a starter kit that includes a sewer hose and a pressure regulator, throw them out and get a top quality sewer hose in the 20 to 30 feet range and get a clear sewer hose elbow. 
2)As others have said get an adjustable pressure regulator which not allows for you to set the pressure,  typically is made of brass and is serviceable. 
3) A quality water hose for potable water, recommend one 20' and at least a second 20', a 50' as your second is a better idea because some campgrounds locate their water connections ridiculously far away.  You may not need the 50' often but when you do, better to have it.  One campground we stayed at the two 20' hoses we had did not even come close, went out and bought a 50' and it barely made it to my connections. A water hose for flushing your black tank if your rig has a hose connection for this and make sure it is a different color, mine is a dark gray with yellow stripes, so you do not mix the two.
4) An electrical plug adapter depending on your rigs electrical supply, a 50Amp to 30Amp or 30Amp to 20Amp. 
5) Your electrical cord is likely 25 to 30 feet which is almost always all that is needed, but again, some campgrounds you may find this is not enough so an extra cord of your amperage of approximately 20-25' is worth having.  But with all you will need this can probably can wait and be placed further down on your list.

Congrats on your purchase and happy travels.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
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Feb 2, 2005
Posts
76,153
Location
West Palm Beach, FL
One caution: do NOT rush out and buy a lot of accessories simply because somebody else thinks they are important.  Many good suggestions have been offered, but find your own way on actual purchases. If you do your initial camping trips within range of a Walmart, you can probably pick up many things you will want as needed.
 

SarniaTricia

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Joined
Aug 15, 2018
Posts
180
Location
Amherstburg, Ontario
All of the above.... plus
(depending on your storage options)
I like to have plastic bins with:
All the camp fire stuff
All the fishing gear
All the black water equipment
ETC
I have one Miscellaneous bucket - this will get cleaned out and reduced if not used in a season.

I like to keep things clean and organized - so I don't need to crawl into the storage space to find one item!
(also, so I don't end up buying something only to find it when I'm not looking for it!)
 

ferfer

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Jul 20, 2008
Posts
419
Location
Arizona
One other thing to think about is backing into camping space. 

If you are experienced with backing a trailer,  likely a spotter with agreed upon hand signals is sufficient.  For the happiness of all,  work on what the signals are and that the spotter is only directing the rear end of the trailer.  Agree that the driver and spotter will look site over (remember to look UP for branches etc.) prior to parking or not complain about position. 

You can use two cell phones or cheap walkie-talkie if voice directions would be better.

If using a spotter, never move the trailer unless you can see the spotter.
 

Jimdamedic

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Jul 22, 2015
Posts
146
lynnmor said:
You should have a spare tire, jack and tools to change it.  A torque wrench with the proper socket(s) and extension would be best since you are to re-torque the lugnuts per your owners manual.

You can get by without the jack if you have a tandem axle trailer and leveling pads.
 

Gizmo100

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Gizmo said:
I agree here with brother Gizmo, except for using wood for leveling blocks.  While wood works and many people do just that, there is a better option, https://andersenhitches.com/Products/3604--camper-leveler.aspx 
Bar none these, while a bit pricey are the simplest, easiest and more accurate if you are a type A picky perfectionist like me, method of leveling.  These beat all  leveling blocks and wood.  If your rig has two axels, make sure to get two.

I would considered these but had mixed feelings at the time I was shopping.

The leveling Block I don't like are the ones that stack like legos blocks. The first time I used them they sank in the dirt and broke a few of the blocks.
 

scale obsession

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Jun 3, 2018
Posts
139
Thank you guys for all the wonderful input! Lots to think about. I have lots of trailer backing experience, just nothing this long. Good thinking on the set hand signals. The dealer did not include a "Starter kit" as far as i know. They offered to sell me one, but it all looked really cheap. I would rather spend the money on the essentials once. I am a bit nervous about all of this, as we are first timers. I don't normally go this deep in on a first time purchase, but we did. Great idea on filming the PDI and instructions. I have a feeling there will be a lot of youtube referencing as well. We also haven't purchased any of the extended warranty stuff, which I'm still on the fence about.
 

SeilerBird

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Feb 25, 2012
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16,702
Location
St Cloud Florida USA
scale obsession said:
Thank you guys for all the wonderful input! Lots to think about. I have lots of trailer backing experience, just nothing this long. Good thinking on the set hand signals. The dealer did not include a "Starter kit" as far as i know. They offered to sell me one, but it all looked really cheap. I would rather spend the money on the essentials once. I am a bit nervous about all of this, as we are first timers. I don't normally go this deep in on a first time purchase, but we did. Great idea on filming the PDI and instructions. I have a feeling there will be a lot of youtube referencing as well. We also haven't purchased any of the extended warranty stuff, which I'm still on the fence about.
Just about every newby feels exactly the same way. However one long weekend camping trip will usually make most of those fears evaporate and be replaced with joy over your new found hobby. RVing really is a lot of fun.
 

Back2PA

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5,766
scale obsession said:
We also haven't purchased any of the extended warranty stuff, which I'm still on the fence about.


I would suggest not buying any extended warranties. This comes from someone who had an extended warranty that more than paid for itself on a diesel pusher. However with a trailer you don't have a chassis with expensive things (engine, transmission, etc) that can break. Probably the most expensive item in your trailer is the fridge, and if you take care of it (don't use it when not level) it will likely outlast your ownership. Known maintenance items will be tires, brakes and bearings so put money away in an RV account for those, plus throw in another $50/mo (or $100 if you have it) and when you need to fix something the money will be sitting in your account.
 

Gizmo

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Wherever we park it
Gizmo100 said:
I would considered these but had mixed feelings at the time I was shopping.

The leveling Block I don't like are the ones that stack like legos blocks. The first time I used them they sank in the dirt and broke a few of the blocks.

I totally agree with you on the lego block style levelers, my experience with them is the same as yours.  In my original bag of 10, I am down to 7, with a couple others that would be on there way out, except now we have a self leveling system. 
 
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