Towing a 2001 Two wheel drive Explorer

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Joined
Jun 21, 2006
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I have a Prevost, and I would like to use a Blue Ox tow bar and tow a 2001 Ford Explorer 2 wheel drive automatic. Can I?
Or do I have to disconnect the drive shaft to do so? Please explain how this works, what I have to do, and what are the easiest vehicles to tow with this type of bar system as far as connecting & disconnecting and towing.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At my Silver Springs FL home
You need to contact the folks at Remco Towing and they will tell you what needs to be done to make your Explorer towable.  I'm pretty sure it is not towable without some modification.  They are honest folks and won't steer you wrong or try to sell you something you don't need.

REMCO is 1 800 228 2481.

http://www.remcotowing.com/
 

John From Detroit

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Davison Michigan
Bonita Beach Guy said:
I have a Prevost, and I would like to use a Blue Ox tow bar and tow a 2001 Ford Explorer 2 wheel drive automatic. Can I?
Or do I have to disconnect the drive shaft to do so? Please explain how this works, what I have to do, and what are the easiest vehicles to tow with this type of bar system as far as connecting & disconnecting and towing.

As Gary said, contact REMCO.  I prefer an Drive Shaft Disconnect to a lube pump by the way. That is a personal preference however. I won't bother defending it.

The easiest vehicles to tow are low and wide.  But with enough ground clearance. Many SUV's are a bit high-center of gravity for my tasts, however many are used as towed, including the Explorer with no problems

As for what is easiest with that tow bar... All the same

One thing you need to do is make sure you follow the tire manafacturer's recommendation for tire pressure. and you should consider a tire pressure monitoring system such as the Pressure Pro that monitors not only the tire pressure on the vehicle you are in, but the one you are towing as well. This system can pay for itself very quickly if a tire on the towed starts to go flat but never gets there cause of the danged BEEP BEEP BEEEP of the alarm
 
Joined
Jun 21, 2006
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Thanks for the advice. Here is why I've asked the question: I want to know WHAT vehicle is easiest to hook up and unhook and drive, without having to get dirty to pull it or unhook and drive it. In my profession, we will be parking (with me wearing a suit), unhooking the vehicle, and driving to our destination for appearences. So, I don't want to get dirty. AT ALL, if possible.
Any ideas?
 

BernieD

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Goodyear, AZ
Bonita Beach Guy said:
Thanks for the advice. Here is why I've asked the question: I want to know WHAT vehicle is easiest to hook up and unhook and drive, without having to get dirty to pull it or unhook and drive it. In my profession, we will be parking (with me wearing a suit), unhooking the vehicle, and driving to our destination for appearences. So, I don't want to get dirty. AT ALL, if possible.
Any ideas?

If you wear a pair of gloves you should be able to go directly to your presentation after unhooking. A drive shaft disconnect or a car with a detach procedure similar to the Jeep's or Honda's would also help keep clean.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,969
Location
At my Silver Springs FL home
If you tow a vehicle "4 down" (all 4 wheels on the pavement) and use a hitch like the Roadmaster All Terrain or Blue Ox Alladin, there is no need to get dirty and the procedure is simple. My wife does ours all the time.  A pair of gloves to keep road dirt of your hands is all you will need.  Or even just some disposable hand wipes to use when you finish.
 
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