Towing a Winnebago Travel Trailer 2201DS

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RayBailey16

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Nov 4, 2018
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9
Good Afternoon,
The firxt question I have ever asked on an RV forum. I have a 21017 Winnebago Minnie Travel Trailer, 26'9" in length. GVWR 7000 lbs. I have towed it with a 1/2 ton 2017 Chevy Silverado LTZ  max towing package, and weight distribution system also. In New England it has towed very well. However, my wife and I are looking forward to heading out West in the spring-fall 2020. Will this be truck enough to get the job done. I failed to mention it has a 5.3 L engine and the gas mileage is pretty good towing. But again, is it truck enough for what we want to do? I am looking for advice from more experienced people who have trailered something similar in similar geography. Help!

Ray Bailey
Salisbury, New Hampshire
 

SpencerPJ

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Nov 1, 2017
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Midwest
No where close for me, watch this and you decide.  Your trailer, 3/4 ton for across country travel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M75Sm7XaIdY
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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West Palm Beach, FL
You didn't mention the bed length or cab type, so I can't look up to the tow rating, but most Silverado 5.3L with tow package are in the 10,000-11,000 lb range. Probably a bit less than that because of the LTZ trim package (adds body weight, decreasing max tow), but still more than enough for a 7000 lb trailer on most any highway.  You won't be racing up grades in the Rockies and mpg may suffer there as well, have have no fear about getting the job done.

Would a 3/4 ton be better?  Of course, but you've got a capable truck there.
 

SpencerPJ

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After further investigation, I too agree that your truck should handle the pulling of your trailer.  For me, I pull a smaller 21' trailer with a YukonXL 4x4, and the wind pushes me around more than my liking at times.  Maybe I had a bad experience up by Lake Michigan with high wind, but I feel that anything over 25' needs a 3/4 ton.  I had a neighbor, 25" TT, pulled it out west with 1500 Suburban, I think 5.3 like mine, came home and sold it for a Dodge 2500 truck.  Hated the experience.  Obviously, you have the truck, it will do it, and slow down if it's windy. 
 

scottydl

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Land of Lincoln
If you don't already know it, find out your actual trailer weight when fully loaded... GVWR only gives you the trailer max rating for its weight, you could be substantially over or under depending on what you have in there. It's good information for you to have & understand either way, and will help you properly calculate your tongue weight and adjust your weight-distribution hitch properly. Here's our Library article on how to weigh your rig:

http://www.rvforum.net/joomla/index.php/26-towing-and-towables/186-weighing-travel-and-fifth-wheel-trailers

Also, I'd recommend you check out many similar conversations in our Towing and Towables or Trailers & Fifth Wheels forum areas.
 

grashley

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May 7, 2015
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Location
Western Kentucky
Welcome to the Forum!

If I were buying a different truck for the trip, I would definitely suggest a ? ton truck, but that was NOT your question.  Since you have a NICE ? ton properly equipped, I would use it!

Scott made an excellent suggestion to get the rig weighed.  That makes sure you are within weight limits.  It also makes sure you have sufficient tongue wt.  Less than 10% of actual trailer weight becomes unstable with a tendency to sway.  Don't go there!

One other concern is tires.  Check the load capacity of the truck tires.  Make sure they exceed the rear axle weight rating (on the driver door pillar)  Note 2 tires to carry one axle.  Often, 1500 series trucks have P rated (passenger) tires because they ride better.  If you need new tires before the trip, I suggest upgrading to LT (Light Truck) tires.  They have stiffer sidewalls and handle towing chores better than P tires.

You have a GREAT trip planned.  Remember to not only stop to smell the roses, but relax long enough to watch them grow!
 
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