Traveling with pups...

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artistrver

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Hopefully this is the place to post this.  We're heading west again in November.  We've got two mid-sized terrier mix pups and the only dangers here in Maine are coyotes, woodticks and fleas.  In NM, we saw signs about scorpions, poisonous snakes, etc., (yikes!)  They are always leashed when outside and I really don't want a trip ruined because of something happening to one of my dogs.  Any stories, tips, safeguards?  They'll be getting Front Line applied and their Heartguard tabs every month... what else?

Also, has anyone gotten one of those spill proof water dishes?  Do they work?  Thanx,  Gail
 

Ned

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Your dogs will be safe if you keep them leashed and don't leave them unattended.

We have a water dish called the Water-Hole (click here) that works fine.  Rides on the floor of the motor home and doesn't spill.
 

artistrver

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Thanx Ned!  That's a very good price too.  I'm ordering one...

We never leave them unattended but I've seen where some of the NP's we'll be visiting in Utah (among others) don't allow them on the trails.  I guess we'll leave the air conditioner running while we gone for an hour or two.
 

Carl L

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quote]They are always leashed when outside and I really don't want a trip ruined because of something happening to one of my dogs.  Any stories, tips, safeguards?  They'll be getting Front Line applied and their Heartguard tabs every month... what else?
Hints for the SW USA:

The issues with dogs will hinge on whether you are inside or outside of an exstablished RV park or urbanized areas.  Snakes, especially rattlers, do not like a lot of human activity and will migrate out of such areas.  Ground litter also gets picked up or cleaned away in such areas.  Walk your down

Outside those areas, keep the dog on a short, 6-foot leash -- not on the end of a 15 foot cord reel.  As you walk, watch the ground ahead of you and your dog, keep him at heel.  You are looking for ant nets; cotton ants which are wingless wasps covered with brightly colored fuzz;  and cactus litter.  If there are cholla growing in an area, stay out of there, the litter will be full of cholla spines.

Always carry something to remove cactus.  A pair of table forks will work, or kitchen tongs even better.  Tweezers are necessary for removing spines.  These items are as handy for you as for your critter.

Do not let your dog snoop at holes and brush heaps.  Dogs are insanely curious about what may be lurking there and the answer may be snakes, coatis, tarantulas, scorpions, and especially black widow spiders.
 

artistrver

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Thanx Carl!  It's just plain common sense.  Lions and tigers and bears, oh my!  Never mind the dogs, what about us two legged critters!

We found out about those needle sharp starlike spines which stuck their paws last time in the SW.  They were very hard to avoid... is that cholla?  Gail
 

artistrver

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Carl,  That may have been the source....  we saw cactus everywhere, especially if the wind can blow them around, the poor pups were hopping around not knowing which paws to stand on.  They looked almost like burrs and needed to be delicately removed or we would get stuck too.  G
 

Ray D

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The cholla is a bloody nightmare. Also called the "Jumping Cactus." Pronounced "choy-ya" as if it had no "L". Scientists have proven that the cactus can't actually jump. Like bumble bees can't fly. I've had them get me, and I'll swear in court that they jumped!

Bloody nightmare, because you feel like you're in a bad dream and getting the spines out is a bloody proposition. Knew one dog to get stuck. Terrible job getting the spines out. It was torture!

If you are close enough to see them, you're too close.

Ray D
 

Carl L

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artistrver said:
Carl,? That may have been the source....? we saw cactus everywhere, especially if the wind can blow them around, the poor pups were hopping around not knowing which paws to stand on.? They looked almost like burrs and needed to be delicately removed or we would get stuck too.? G

Like I say, if they are in the area, avoid the area.

Folks who hunt with dogs in the desert, chukar for instance, put boots on their mutts.
 

woodartist

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I have traveled and hiked all over the SW and never had a problem, other than one dog got stung by yellow jackets...once. We have even had coyotes follow us, although I always carry the pistol in case something goes wrong. I do know of dogs that were killed by Mohave Green snakes bit they were tied up. The logging chain people :mad: So, I don't think there is a major problem. The burrs folks talk about are what I consider as miniature burdock...you might relate to those. FYI, Burdock was the inspiration for velcro:)

We aren't "rich folks" so we just put the dog water in the tub...if it spills, no problem.

So, enjoy the trip and don't fret too much..........................
 

Wendy

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Ray D said:
I've had them get me, and I'll swear in court that they jumped!

And here I thought it was called Jumping Cholla because it made you jump.

Dogs in the SW, use the same caution you'd use anywhere. Snakes, spiders, coyotes, cactus.....you'll find lots of these anywhere. We do have a lot less problem with fleas and ticks tho, they don't like the dry weather. We only use Frontline on Sam when we go east. He does get Heartworm monthly although many question needing it all year long. Also, keep in mind that if your dog is harrasing livestock, ranchers can shoot them....another really good reason to keep them on a short leash.

Sounds like these are small dogs? Never, ever leave a small dog unattended in the great outdoors.....larger wildlife looks on them as lunch.

But don't take all this wrong and worry. In 20+ years in desert SW, I've only seen 3 snakes and 2 scorpions. As others said, these beasts tend to run the other way when us big, noisy clunky folks come near. Just use the same common sense caution for the hairy kids that you use for yourself.

And above all, enjoy.
 

woodartist

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Wendy has a good point about the ranchers and even the National Forest folks. They have coyote "bombs" here in Utah and release a poison when a dog tries to eat it. Nice government. People have complained but the feds basically ignore them. Yes, ranchers will put out stricknine (sp?) and we lost a dog in Wy to one of those compassionate folks........................
 

artistrver

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Thanx for all the advice and tips.  Oh goodness... coyote bombs?  Our dogs, about 30lbs. each, will always be safely on a leash or in a fenced yard while we're present. 

Another thing is the RV camps that don't allow dogs over 20lbs., which we ran into last year.  What's with that?
 

Wendy

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artistrver said:
Another thing is the RV camps that don't allow dogs over 20lbs., which we ran into last year.? What's with that?

You got me on that one. I never have been able to figure it out. I would think 'well behaved' with owners who pick up after them would be more important than size.
 

stevemc

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Sep 5, 2006
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We are new to RVing and just researching to see what to buy. We have a toy poodle we will plan to take with us.  He'll always be on a short leash outside but occasionally I expect we'll want to go somewhere where he can't go with us so we plan to leave him in the RV with the air conditioning running.  Problem is I know he'll bark constantly. Especially in a campground with vehicles going by and activity going on all around.  I'm worried that the barking will be a nuisance and get us in trouble.  Anyone had experience with this?  We're looking at class c motorhomes and will leave a radio on to help keep him company, but I'm still afraid his barking may be too lound outside the coach.  Thanks, Steve
 

blueblood

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stevemc said:
We are new to RVing and just researching to see what to buy. We have a toy poodle we will plan to take with us.? He'll always be on a short leash outside but occasionally I expect we'll want to go somewhere where he can't go with us so we plan to leave him in the RV with the air conditioning running.? Problem is I know he'll bark constantly. Especially in a campground with vehicles going by and activity going on all around.? I'm worried that the barking will be a nuisance and get us in trouble.? Anyone had experience with this?? We're looking at class c motorhomes and will leave a radio on to help keep him company, but I'm still afraid his barking may be too lound outside the coach.? Thanks, Steve

Barking is a big NO!NO! It will result in explusion from most parks and certainly engender a lot of bad vibes from others in park. In some juridictions, it is illegal to leave an animal unattended in a motorhome and his barking would certainly alert the park owners to call Animal Police. Most parks will not allow dogs to be outside motorhome even on leash unattended. Some towns have doggie day care businesses where you can leave a dog while you go sightseeing, etc. Overall, it soesn't sound like your dog is a good fit for RV'ing. 
 

stevemc

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Sep 5, 2006
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Thanks Leo, I was afraid that was the case, and is understandable.  We'll have to change our plans about taking him or investigate some kind of training.  Steve
 
D

D2

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stevemc,

Years ago we had a Scottish Terrier who loved to ride in the car but was really excited the whole trip.  Our vet prescribed a small dose of tranquilizer to calm him down on long trips.  Barking wasn't his problem but it did settle him down and made for a more pleasant trip for everyone.  I would not recommend doing this on a daily basis but if you are considering leaving your dog occasionally, this might be a remedy.  Please check with your vet.  I would only use what the vet prescribes not any over the counter human drugs.

Or, you could contact "The Dog Whisperer", Caesar Milan (National Geographic channel) and see if you can get on his show and have him, as he says, he "rehabilitates dogs and trains people".  Seriously, it is a great show and one that can give dog owners tips in dealing with behavioral problems.
 

Wendy

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Constant barking is big no-no but an occasional woof when someone walks by is ok. Are you sure your pooch is going to bark when you're gone? Have you 'tested' him by leaving and sneaking back? I hate muzzles and have never know them to be used for barking. You might try a bark collar but don't put it on the dog and leave him alone for a long time.
 
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