Unusual tire wear on my Outback

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

sslunick

New member
Joined
Jul 26, 2006
Posts
2
Location
Clarkston Mich
I have a 2004 28RSS Outback TT that is showing unusal tire wear patterns on all four tires.  The sides of the tread are wearing down fast and the middle of the tread is almost new.  I check the tire pressure before we go out and always make sure it is at 50psi (max pressure according to sidewall)

Could this be a bearing issue? 

Any help would be appreciated.

PS.  I checked a few other Keystone trailers at the storage lot and they too seem to be wearing like mine only no where near as severe as mine.
 

Ned

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Posts
25,107
Location
USA
That wear pattern indicates underinflation.  Even though you have the tires at maximum pressure, it's possible they're overloaded.  Have you weighed the trailer?
 

caltex

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Posts
731
Location
North Texas/Northern California
I have a two axle boat trailer that does the same thing.  Tires are inflated properly and are not overloaded, but they look like they have been running underinflated. Sorry I don't have an answer, just the same problem.
 

Shayne

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Posts
4,324
Sure wouldn't hurt the check out the tires themselves to see what the rating is for them, in regard to weight of the trailer.  Many times a couple of bucks makes a difference and dealers will cut everything they can, even tire size.  Just perhaps the tires were switched with another trailer and this has the wrong size on them.  Or perhaps it's been ordered from the factory with the wrong size, this would be the Manufacturers terrible mistake to ship it that way.  Could possibly be many possiblities relating to the dealer and manufacturer,  and we are know how truthful many of them are. First thing I would do is weigh the trailer and start from there. Weighing dry (empty) and loaded.  Then get the weighs and compare them to the recommedations..  Good Luck.  Carl  or Ned will probably be able to give you the specifics to figure it out.  Good luck
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
Trailer tires do have a tendency to wear on the outside.  They are mounted on dead axles and tend to scrub on turns.  Next time you are executing a tight left hand turn on pavement, watch the wheels and tires in your side mirror, they assume all sorts of crazy angles to accomodate the turn. 

Overload and underinflation can accelerate this wear.  So can poor tire quality.  Tho I have no real authorities to cite here, I believe that the soft sidewalls of P rated tires can also, as compare to ST or LT tires with stiffer sidewalls.

Anyway check the tire weight ratings against the scaled weight of your trailer in a ready to travel state.  If the total ratings of your tires is less than the weight of your trailer, you may have found your problem.
 

peck

New member
Joined
Oct 9, 2006
Posts
2
Hello,
I have a 2003 30 ft Wildcat Fifth wheel. The back tires wear abnormally on the outside. The outermost tread are chopped unevenly. I replaced the tires with? Goodyear ST D rated tires? and had? them balanced. After a 4500 mile trip, they are doing it again. The? back passenger tire outermost thread is worn to the core. I can not afford to replace the two back tires after every trip. I stopped by the Wildcat dealer for help. They do not deal with tire problems.? If anyone has a cure for these problem please let me know.
Thanks,
peck
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
If anyone has a cure for these problem please let me know
.

1.  Weigh your trailer in ready to travel mode.  Try to get a weight on that rear axle alone in the process.  Compare it with the Gross Vechicle Weight rating of your trailer.  Compare the rear axle weight with the rear axle weight rating on the DOT place.  If the ratings are exceeded, lighten up.

2.  Raise the inflation of those tires to the sidewall maximum.

3.  Cupping implies hopping.  Consider a set of aftermarket trailer shock kits.  I believe Monroe makes some.
 

2006F350

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Posts
393
Location
Memphis TN
Carl, I hope this doesn't start something once again, but I've got to chime in here (with some facts - granted I only read them in the Oct '06 Edition of Good Sam's Highways). The article was written by a person that has been in the tire business for 30+ years and is also an engineer. He emphatically stated that we, as RV'ers need to follow the recommendations of the particular manufacturer as to tire size, load range and air pressure for our RV's, regardless of trailer or MH, and NOT inflate to max sidewall pressure, but to what the manufacturer recommends for the recommended size and load range. If you have what is recommended, and your tires still appear underinflated, loose some of the weight, as you are overloading both frame axles, and tires. Reason ... before the trailer is released the Manufacturer has put it thru plenty of testing to identify what the 'ideal' tire size, load range, and air pressure is for that setup at max GVWR. I'm not saying don't inflate to max sidewall pressure, but to inflate to what the mfg recommends - in my case, Keystone says 80PSI, and that just happens to be my max tire sidewall rating also.

Larry
 
Top Bottom