URGENT: Black tank leak

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jymbee

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Finally on the other side, for the most part, of sub freezing temps here in TX. Unfortunately, it looks like despite my best efforts we now have leak in the black water holding tank. After crawling around down there it appears to dripping from the "seam" in the tank. Pretty steady drip... drip.. drip...

Wasn't in a position to take a picture at that time.

Wondering if there's any product that can be applied to "repair" the leaking section at least temporarily?
 

John From Detroit

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First. if you can DUMP

A product called GOOP sticks to most stuff

A product called Seal All sticks to most everythign and will stop an active leak in a gas tank. Don't ask how I know that
 

beaverfever

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enternabond as a temporary fix. they say it can be applied under water but doesn't mention poop
 

Wolfram

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I confirm eternabond is the way to go. You need a plastic cement that works with ABS plastic. Could ask a local plumbing supply company for something quicker. Good luck.
 

SpencerPJ

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If you can find the spot on the seam it is leaking, I highly recommend some plastic glues the JB Weld puts out, available at any auto store. If it is a seam, you might be able to turn off water, mount a fan to toilet to create positive pressure inside, get underneath and find leak with squirt bottle of soapy water, pretty easy. Once found, rinse area well, JB Glue, and I'd bet a pretty easy fix. Reminder, clean and flush tank first :poop:
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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A black tank will be ABS or polyethylene plastic, so you need a sealer compatible with those. Plumbing repair epoxy is usually compatible with ABS, so a good choice. JB Weld make a Plastic Weld that is rated for use on ABS and other plastics. Flex-Set from Marinetex is another excellent sealer for ABS & polyethylene.
 

jymbee

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Thanks for the input from all! Just getting back online to read...

I'm going to crawl back under there today now that it's above freezing (!) and try to get a better idea exactly what's going on.

Also, we're less than an hour away from PPL in Houston. I called them and of course they wouldn't offer much advice over the phone (understandable) but said we could stop there Monday morning en route to our next stop and they can look at it.

We have been there before but not for service. My cynical nature fears that they will push for a more costly repair, perhaps a new tank, rather than attempt any temporary fix. But due to other commitments we're not able to hang around as long as such a procedure would take.

Such fun... (not)
 

SpencerPJ

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Good luck, and I agree, I highly doubt PPL does a fix, and not wish to replace it. Hopefully sliding under you can determine an easy fix, even if at your next stay you have a mobile RV tech come and do as you ask. You'd probably get much better results.
On the flipside: If PPL can replace it, and you can afford it, it's a no brainer.
 
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Jayflight

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Its a long shot, But I did a water tank like this one time when I could not get it out because of the mounting brackets deep into a void. . If you can actually get to the leak and after you dump, I wonder if you can take an iron and "weld it back together" with some heat thru a wash cloth. When you get it soft, maybe push the seam back together with your hand
 

Lou Schneider

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If you can see the crack, drill a small hole at each end to relieve the tearing forces and stop the crack from spreading further. Then clean around the crack and apply some Eternabond tape for a permanent fix. I carry a small roll with me as it's also a good fix for roof tears.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Shops generally avoid repairs actions that aren't industry standard procedures or don't have a high probability of success. Replacing a part is almost always safer (from a liability point of view) then attempting to fix a damaged part. Not always a better chance of solving the problem, but less chance of getting sued if it fails to produce good results. It's a shame that the repair business has become more worried about legal repercussions than getting the job done, but it's a fact of life in the USA.
 

dabrooks

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Shops generally avoid repairs actions that aren't industry standard procedures or don't have a high probability of success. Replacing a part is almost always safer (from a liability point of view) then attempting to fix a damaged part. Not always a better chance of solving the problem, but less chance of getting sued if it fails to produce good results. It's a shame that the repair business has become more worried about legal repercussions than getting the job done, but it's a fact of life in the USA.
This a bit messy but my friend usef this method to repair his tank,
 

Ray-IN

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The tank must be completely dry to use a plastic welder, however it is the only permanent repair. Some epoxies may be semi-permanent, again there must not be any water or "dirt" present.
 

jymbee

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Shops generally avoid repairs actions that aren't industry standard procedures or don't have a high probability of success. Replacing a part is almost always safer (from a liability point of view) then attempting to fix a damaged part. Not always a better chance of solving the problem, but less chance of getting sued if it fails to produce good results. It's a shame that the repair business has become more worried about legal repercussions than getting the job done, but it's a fact of life in the USA.
Hard to determine whether there's one spot with a leak that's seeping along the seam, or whether it's over longer length. Crawling around under there I was able to take a snapshot of what I'm seeing but the overall difficulty is compounded greatly by the fact that the park we're in has been officially closed for days and the dump station is out of service for repair. I can't get directly under for a good view without taking a shower in... well, you know.

With absolutely no experience or expertise with respect to the kinds of sealants mentioned here, I'd like to be cautiously optimistic that I can come up with something that will last until we get back home in about 5 weeks.

tanksm.jpg
 

jymbee

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I confirm eternabond is the way to go. You need a plastic cement that works with ABS plastic. Could ask a local plumbing supply company for something quicker. Good luck.
I see many recommendations of eternabond for leaky roofs, but none for black tank repair. (?)
 

SpencerPJ

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That is not the type of seam I was expecting, 2 halves joined. I agree, that might be a tough one to repair. I'd probably try the tape but the more that gets filled to capacity the worse things could end up. If you don't replace it on this trip, I certainly would try and keep it on the more empty side.
 

jymbee

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Well, as I described previously I could not be sure the source of the leak. After an inspection at the shop where they were able to remove access panels to get to the heart of the problem, turns out it's the macerator pump and what I'm seeing originated there and seeped down. But if I was able to wait a couple of weeks for the part to come in they could do the repair for around four thousand bucks. Uh-- Thanks but I don't think so...

Obviously I have a lot to learn about this whole plumbing situation. Didn't know, and some others have stated firmly, that our Bounder even has a macerator pump. Perhaps the pump in this vaccuflush system can be described using different terms and still mean the same thing.

I would attach an image they took of the situation but trust me, not a pretty sight.

I called Fleetwood ("REV Genuine Parts") gave them our VIN number and was told the pump could be purchased for $800. Others with similar rigs state they paid $1,200 for replacement macerator. Still others, say they paid much less.

Haven't decided exactly what to do given our original plan was to return home in around 4 weeks. Doubtful we'll be able to find a reasonable repair service given the time to ship alone. Exploring a number of alternate "Plan Bs".
 

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