Utility trailer and old tires?

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Isaac-1

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As some of you may know we are buying a new house, if all goes well we will be closing on it in a couple of weeks. I have an 18 ft metal deck car hauler style utility trailer, which have not been using in recent years which I plan to use to haul our various belonging over to our new house, making multiple trips which is located less than 3 miles away. The tires on the trailer are low mileage, but are 10 years old, still hold air, the question is would you risk it? Most direct route to the new house would 35 mph speed limit almost all the way there, fastest route would have about 1.5 mile of 55 mph highway.
 

Lou Schneider

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Replace the tires, grease the wheel bearings and check the springs, shackles and brakes. it's the only safe way. :rolleyes:
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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How much is 4 new but cheap-brand tires for it? And do you have a spare and a jack in case needed?

There is simply way to predict the outcome if you gamble. If you do so, I'd take the low speed route, which seems less likely to stress and less likely to cause damage to trailer and its cargo if it fails.
 

Rene T

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I totally agree. Have someone follow behind you. Have a jack and lug nut wrench close by in case. If you don’t have them you’ll have issues.
 

Isaac-1

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It has a spare, though the spare is the same age as the rest, and I would only be lightly loaded, (no more than a thousand pounds per trip, probably less, 3,500+ pound capacity (dual 3500 pound axles), oh and before someone asks about tow vehicle it is a 2000 F250 Crew cab with 7.3L diesel

p.s. best price locally on tires is about $120 each, I am thinking about selling the trailer after we get moved as there is no good place to store it at the new house, and I rarely use it anymore. May replace it with something smaller, as I also have access to larger gooseneck trailers I can borrow
 

viceprice

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I totally agree. Have someone follow behind you. Have a jack and lug nut wrench close by in case. If you don’t have them you’ll have issues.
That is some good New Englander philosophy that I subscribe to! Love it! If I take if with me and prepare for it, I won't need it/it won't happen!

Go for it-take the slow road!
 

SpencerPJ

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I'd risk it, keep it slow. I think the blow outs are from heat, generated by speed. You have a spare, have a jack and 4 way (at least know where you know they are). Congrats on the new house, good luck and hope for good weather.
 

Mark_K5LXP

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When you see the tires on landscaper and utility trailers I see running around town here it would have to be some pretty wounded tires that I wouldn't trust to go a few miles. You're not going far enough, fast enough even on the highway for any sidewall heat to build up and even if there was a catastrophic failure, it would be just one and not all four at once. If they hold air and the cord's not showing, check the box. Maybe have some spots in mind along the route to duck into in case there's an issue but my bet is you'll be fine.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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p.s. best price locally on tires is about $120 each, I am thinking about selling the trailer after we get moved
So $500+ vs some unknown level of risk for x number of short trips. I'd probably prepare as best I could for an emergency (gloves, a good jack, spare aired-up, etc) and gamble.
 

Skookum

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The safest way, and if you plan on getting some good future use out of the trailer, go get new tires and check things over real good. By time, it’s time…

If the tires aren’t visibly cracked, I’d probably risk it on old tires. It would make me think twice and drive a bit slower if I had anything of value on the trailer or that I’d be upset if it was damaged…not that I think the trailer would flip or something, but who knows what a flat might do.

My second biggest worry would be losing the better part of a move-day to a blown tire. Adding stress on top of stress is never fun.

Good luck…99% chance you’ll be fine…Murphy has his way of dropping in for an unexpected visit, as we all know. Hopefully he’s busy visiting others on your move day!!
 

John From Detroit

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Replace the tires, grease the wheel bearings and check the springs, shackles and brakes. it's the only safe way. :rolleyes:


Lou is correct (of course) but ... I did not. and only blew one tire. What's more I was towing with about 2,000 pounds of concrete (Broken up) in the trailer and on the freeway. Tires held.
Towing back home EMPTY.. that's when one blew. No damage in fact had someone not shouted I'd not have known.

Once I finished getting rid of the broken concrete the trailer made one last trip.. the the metal recycler.
 

Lou Schneider

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Replace the tires, grease the wheel bearings and check the springs, shackles and brakes. it's the only safe way. :rolleyes:
That was meant as sarcasm, coming from the guy who fired up the 35 ft. motorhome that had been sitting in one spot for 5 years on 12 year old tires and successfully drove it 300 miles across the Mojave Desert to Pahrump.
 

NY_Dutch

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Since you'll be running light loads, I'd stick a chunk of chain in the truck along with the jack. To save time if a tire blows on the road, just jack up the blown tire and chain up the axle. The other one will handle the load ok. Change the tire after you unload...
 
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