Water Pressure

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chunter

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Does anyone know what the water pressure average should be at campgrounds?

Thanks
Charlie Hunter
 

Woody

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I *should* be somewhere around 40 psi. That said, the water pressure at many campgrounds is either less or more. Excessive pressure can do damage to your RV water lines so most of us use a pressure regulator on the shore water hookup hose.
 

chunter

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Thanks for the reply.  That is about what I thougt.  I am currently at a park that is at 37psi, and I would like a little more.  I too have a pressure controller, but I cannot remember that last time that I used it.
 

BernieD

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chunter said:
Thanks for the reply.  That is about what I thougt.  I am currently at a park that is at 37psi, and I would like a little more.  I too have a pressure controller, but I cannot remember that last time that I used it.

Chunter

If you want a little more water pressure while taking a shower, turn on the water pump as well as the hose. That'll give you more pressure, but don't forget to keep your fresh water tank full ;D
 

Carl L

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chunter said:
Does anyone know what the water pressure average should be at campgrounds?

Thanks
Charlie Hunter

How long is a piece of string?*

I have seen parks with such low pressure that we had to operate off our tank and pump.? ?Then there was the park in Salt Lake that had water pressure a bit over 100 psi.? Guaranteed to blow out the plumbing of any RV incautious enough to hitch to the park's system without a pressure regulator. (Your RV's water system is designed to take no more than 45 psi.)? ?Saw a blow out? happen to somee poor souls near us -- water pouring out of the trailer -- while they were gone for the day.

Worse yet, during the day and evening the pressure may be within proper limits, but in the wee hours, when no one is using water, the pressure may go sky high.? ? ?

Moral:? Always, and I mean always, use a 45 psi pressure regulator between the hydrant and your hose.? ?It is also a good thought to turn the water off at the hydrant when you leave for the day.
 

Ron

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The newer motorhomes are suppose to handle 60 PSI and are tested at 75PSI.  We have a regulator installed between the two filters so even at VIP in SLC we are safe.  I have seen water presure as high as 105psi at VIP.

 

chunter

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Thanks to everyone for the info, especially BernieD.  Had the best shower in a week with both the hose and the water pump turned on. 
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Water system designers usually figure about 40 psi for a community water system, i.e. one with no high rise buildings. Many older RV parks fall  short of that, but you will see other extremes too.  Sometimes the water supply is up ona hillside or boosted with a big pump and there can be very high pressure (55-65 pi) or pressure shock waves passing through the system as pumps cycle on/off. These waves can momentarily reach 100+ psi, so a regulator may be useful even when average pressure is low.

Your RV also has a water VOLUME problem because of the narrow diameter tubing used.  Higher pressure, e.g. running the pump as well as the campground supply, helps to overcome that.

By the way, your Rvs pump is typically set to produce 45-48 psi.
 

Ron

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RV Roamer said:
Water system designers usually figure about 40 psi for a community water system, i.e. one with no high rise buildings. Many older RV parks fall? short of that, but you will see other extremes too.? Sometimes the water supply is up ona hillside or boosted with a big pump and there can be very high pressure (55-65 pi) or pressure shock waves passing through the system as pumps cycle on/off. These waves can momentarily reach 100+ psi, so a regulator may be useful even when average pressure is low.

Your RV also has a water VOLUME problem because of the narrow diameter tubing used.? Higher pressure, e.g. running the pump as well as the campground supply, helps to overcome that.

By the way, your Rvs pump is typically set to produce 45-48 psi.

Not any more the Aquajet water pump, now being installed in many coaches such as Country Coach and American Coach, provides 5.3 gpm @ 60psi,.  That is what we have on board.  I believe shurflo and Flojet make similar pumps with 60 PSI pressure.  IMHO the best RV pump available is  the AquaJet.
 

chunter

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Does anyone know what type of water pump is installed by Fleetwood on the late model ('05) Excursion?
 

Jeff

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To improve water flow while you are hooked up replace the inline RV water pressure reulator with a house type. Ace Hardware sells one that is quite compact but with twice the cross section of the hose type regulators. I mounted ours in the water cabinet so it does not protect the hose but is much more convienent.

Haven't blown a hose yet and BIG improvement in the shower. :)
 

Carl L

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Jeff /Washington said:
To improve water flow while you are hooked up replace the inline RV water pressure reulator with a house type. Ace Hardware sells one that is quite compact but with twice the cross section of the hose type regulators. I mounted ours in the water cabinet so it does not protect the hose but is much more convienent.

Haven't blown a hose yet and BIG improvement in the shower. :)

Agreed.  I have a model, the Acme 134 that is designed for mobile homes.    It has good volume and is adjustable.  Put an inline pressure gauge downstream from it and you can keep the pressure right at 45 psi.  I mount it at the hydrant end tho, not so much to protect the hose as  for convenience of setting up.
 

Jeff

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Agreed.  I have a model, the Acme 134 that is designed for mobile homes.    It has good volume and is adjustable.  Put an inline pressure gauge downstream from it and you can keep the pressure right at 45 psi.  I mount it at the hydrant end tho, not so much to protect the hose as  for convenience of setting up

Carl, that is the model I have with a gauge. Mounted it so that I hook the hose to it and never have to touch it except to adjust the pressure very occassionally.
 

Ned

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We have a Watts whole house style regulator that I hookup when the pressure is too high. ?Anything over 50psi is too high, generally. ?The inline brass Marshall regulators, while better than nothing, reduce the flow rate too much for us. ?I believe they are intended for irrigation use where a high flow rate isn't needed.

I always put the regulator on the water riser, as excessive water pressure will damage a hose just as it will your plumbing.
 

John From Detroit

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I have one park where I did not use a regulator on my last trip, however I'm very familure with the water system in that park (Helped install parts of it) and I know that it's lmited to about 40-25 PSI max... It's a local well and pump system.

I've been in city supplied parks where I'd see the pressure vary, from down around 30 psi to well over 70 psi and back

At that park I had a Marshall Brass Regulator

I've been to Marshall (the city, not the company which is located there) many times, and grew up in Tekonsha (the Township after which that company is named) went to school with the current owners of Teknosha engineering, tried to date the founder's daughter, failed.
 
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