Water Pressure

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Shellback

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Aug 14, 2006
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New Hampshire
:mad:

I have been wondering why my water pressure seems low.  I tried 2 reducers and even took them off for a test.  I tried the water pump from the holding tank and still the water pressure is not like it is at my house.  Is this normal?  I would guess it to be about half the pressure as my house.  I made sure all the shut offs are fully open. 

Thanks for any clues,
Ron
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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It's not the pressure, which is probably close to what you have at home (40-50 psi) in most areas of the USA. Rather, you are suffering from a shortage of water volume, i.e. gallons per minute.  Most RVs have small tubing for water lines and numerous fittings (angles, tees, check valves, etc) as well, which further reduces flow rates. Then there is your pressure regulator, if you have one (or more than one, as is often the case). Most RV water pressure regulators have low max flow rates, typically 2 gpm or even less.

If you have one of those little brass or plastic regulators from an RV store, it is surely a low flow model. Consider replacing it with a "whole house" regulator from a hardware store.  That may not help, though, if your RV has a built-in regulator (many do nowadays) that also has a low flow rate.  As for the tubing size, it is often not practical to do much about it, though in some rigs it may be possible to pull new, larger tubing through the raceways, behind cabinets are whatever.
 

Carl L

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west Los Angeles
Your RV plumbing is rated for 45 psi and most RV pressure regulators are set to 45psi.    I do not know about your house, but my house has about 85 psi.   In any case, as Gary says, RV regulators restrict total flow.    You can get regulators that give better flow: mobile home regulators like the Cash Acme No.135 that are adjustable as well.  Use them in conjunction with a downstream pressure gauge.
 

Steve CDN

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If you find that water pressure is not the issue consider this:

RV plumbing is notorious for accumulating debris such as sand and organic material in the faucet screens.  Try unsrewing the faucet screens to see if there is some blockage.

If your coach has a water filter in the line, the filter may be clogged and needs replacement.  We triple filter our water with two "whole house" residential filters at the water inlet of the coach and a third ceramic filter for drinking water.

If it's non of these, then have a look at the connection where you connect your water hose to the coach.  You may have to remove the entire fitting because these fittings sometimes incorporate a check valve to prevent backflow.  These checkvalves sometimes become corroded and block water flow.

While you're at it, check for any other check valves in the line...perhaps at the water spigot where you're getting your water.

Will be interested in knowing how you make out ;)
 

Shellback

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Aug 14, 2006
Posts
18
Location
New Hampshire
::)|Thank everyone for the feedback, I just was not sure this was normal and now I see it is. 

I guess I'll live with it, seeing even when I bypassed the pressure reducer it was about the same, so it looks like it is the size of the lines.

Sorry but I'm still trying to learn about this RV seeing it is my first and I drove from NH to CA with really minor problems. 

You all are great on this site and I appreciate your comments.

Ron
 

Steve CDN

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Ron,

We're here to help one another, so we hope you will continue participating in our online community to share your experience with others.  What type of RV do you have?
 

Karl

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Ron,
Even if the water pressure is o.k., still check those screens on the faucets like Steve suggested. In areas of hard water, it will amaze you how cruded up they can get. As both Gary and Carl have suggested, those rv regulators aren't worth a darn. Get an adjustable, whole-house regulator, and make sure your water filters (if any; and you should have it/them) are fairly new/clean.
 

Ron

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Jan 29, 2005
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Home is where we park it
Yep clean those washer screens.  I just finished this activity when Sam complained about low flow at the kitchen sink.  Took about 5 minutes but when I was done we had full flow again and Sam is happy.
 

John From Detroit

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Apr 12, 2005
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Davison Michigan
I will make one comment about those pressure reducers.

Most of them are also flow restrictors and will give you very little pressrure in the rig

Some RV stores, including both my dealer and Camping World sell a new HIGH VOLUME unit whick I've seen in recent years. it's ALMOST and I do mean almost good enough to keep me happy (LIke 90 percent or so)

I wound up with a Watts "Whole house" size which I got at a plumbing supply (Many Lowes and Home depots carry too) with hose fittings.  Works great
 

Gnuman

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Oct 13, 2006
Posts
25
Concerning the water lines inside the coach, what is the normal size for those (on RV's). I was looking at the lines in a friends coach and his lines looked like they could fit inside mine! what I mean by that is it looked like the OD of his water lines was less than the ID of mine (assuming a 1/16 or 1/32 wall thickness, which seems to be pretty standard for plastic piping). The OD on mine looks to be about 3/4", while my friends looked to be a bit under a half inch. Is my piping exceptionally large, or is his really small (no off topic giggling, please)?
 

Gnuman

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Oct 13, 2006
Posts
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So Roamer, you are saying that what I have is indicative of my rig having been High End for it's time? because it would have to be very thick material for the ID to be less than 1/2". With this thickness of piping, I'm guessing that my pressure problems at the shower head (the only place I really notice them at all) probably have to do with my pressure regulator being flow restricting as well. One final question regarding those "High Flow" regulators: Do they, or even the regular ones, need to be replaced regularly, or can they be serviced in some way?
 

Shellback

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Aug 14, 2006
Posts
18
Location
New Hampshire
Well I went to Camping World and bought a high volume pressure reducers and that did the trick.  A vast difference in my pressure.

Thanks for all your help!

Ron ;D
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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For the small, inline regulators it's generally necessary to replace them, though they may last many, many years if they are not continually subjected to hard water. The bigger "whole house" models probably can be serviced, though it would not be cost effective to pay somebody to do it. Strictly a DIY thing. There's not much too a regulator mechanically, so maintenance is not a big thing to worry about.
 

John From Detroit

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Davison Michigan
Roamer,  On my watts I've read the service manual.. Servicing is a lot like changing a faucet washer on the kitchen sink
(At least complexity wise) compared to a carbarator rebuild it's child's play
 
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