Weight ?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Hillbilly

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Posts
13
I seen where some of you use a % factor to checking for max towing weight. I checked my max towing weight for the f-150 and it is 6300 lbs.  I don't travel to the west but thee are some mountains around northern Alabama that I sometimes travel to. I would be hauling a 650lb atv with me from time to time. What trailer weight should I look for? I know this question has been asked a thousand times. So any help would be appriciated...
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
In evaluating maximum towable weight of trailer we like to allow 10% for a safety factor, to allow for tow vehicle loading and variations in age and state of tune.  Compare that with the GVWR of the trailer.  If you decide to go west, then bump that factor to 20% to allow for 6000 foot plus elevations and miles long 8% grades.
 

Lowell

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Posts
2,221
Location
Tempe, AZ
I'm assuming you are hauling your ATV in the bed of the pickup, not in the trailer.  If so, you should check the F-150 axles weights to be sure you don't overload your rear axle.  To get a better idea of what you have to work with, load the ATV into the truck with whatever else you may take along in the pickup including passengers, and get an actual weight of each axle.  With that information, you can then see what margin you have left for the trailer and the F150 axle loads.  Now if you are putting the ATV into a toy hauler trailer, then you are looking the loaded weight of the trailer with all its contents.
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
I'm assuming you are hauling your ATV in the bed of the pickup, not in the trailer.
 

Whoops, overlooked that ATV!  Hillbilly is going have to subtract the weight of that ATV from his tow rating.  It is way beyond any 10% safety factor calculation.
 

Hillbilly

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Posts
13
I live in South Mississippi but I used to live in Gadsden and I still travel there and to Cheaha Mountain  and to the Little River Park in Fort Payne.

Most trailers I am looking at is around 3500-4500 lbs dry weight. Do you think I will be alright or do I still have some room?
This is my calculations but not sure I done it right...
6300 - ATV = 5650
5650-20%=4520
 

Lowell

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Posts
2,221
Location
Tempe, AZ
Hillbilly,

I have a Dodge 1500 and with my trailer hooked up, I would be over my GAWR if I were to load my 605 lb ATV in the truck bed.  You might need to consider moving up to a 3/4 ton truck.
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
Hillbilly said:
I live in South Mississippi but I used to live in Gadsden and I still travel there and to Cheaha Mountain  and to the Little River Park in Fort Payne.

Most trailers I am looking at is around 3500-4500 lbs dry weight. Do you think I will be alright or do I still have some room?
This is my calculations but not sure I done it right...
6300 - ATV = 5650
5650-20%=4520

In terms of trailer GVWR, you are indeed cool with those numbers.  Do weigh that rear axle load with the ATV in the bed and compare it with the GAWR of your little old F-150.

 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
Hillbilly said:
This forum must not be Ford Country  ???  ;D

Not really.  We just do not believe that a F-150, or a 1500 Silverado/Sierra for that matter, can tow anything.  No matter what some bloody salesman says.

On the other hand, F-150s can haul some things.  You just gotta run the numbers and be conservative.  (See my signature block.)
 

Ron

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Posts
18,082
Location
Home is where we park it
Hillbilly said:
This forum must not be Ford Country  ???  ;D

I would say that it is just that we try our very best to provide correct honest information and would not want to jeopardize antibody's safety by giving out bad information.  The GVWR and GCVWR are provided there for your safety and to violate them is just plain incompetence that puts people in danger.  Unlike many salesman or dealers we would have nothing to gain telling folks something that just isn't correct.  Understand and run the numbers and you will come to the same conclusions as we do.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
73,969
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
Plenty of Ford experience here - I owned an F150 (long ago) and a 99 F250 Superduty diesel and also a96  Ford chassis motorhome. Many others have owned or currently own Ford trucks or motorhomes. We aren't knocking Fords ( I rather like their trucks), just trying to give factual advice tempered with our accumulated experience.  We may be a bit conservative, but we see an awful lot of overloaded trucks. Especially half tons like the 150. So we prefer to err on the side of caution so that you - and everyone else on the highway - will be safe.
 

Hillbilly

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Posts
13
I know I need a bigger truck but that will be a while before that happens. I will check my GVAWR and weight. Thanks guys!!
 
Top Bottom