What size box for 5th wheel?

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rambler28

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I've had 2 3/4 ton 8' bed and 2 1 ton 8' bed. 2021 F350 super duty 6.7 8' bed goose neck, is the tow truck I use today you never know what your future 5th wheel be. Resale value my be more.
 

Bigmau

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Dec 29, 2018
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Fords Super Duty "short bed" is 6'9", long bed is 8'.

So with the long you gain 1'3" using my fuzzy math.

I've got a "short", don't regret it at all.

I would like to think the Short bed would have a better turning radius, but it's no peach as it is.
I don't know about all the fuss "short bed, long bed". I have a F250 Super with short bed. I pull a 33Ft fiver. In the front of the bed, I have a combination tool box/fuel tank that holds 60gl of diesel. I have the B&W companion single point, no slider and made more than once a full 90* with no problem at all. Granted, I don't have much room in the bed but can hold cases of water or anything that is below the railing. My tool box sits less than one inch below the railing. Easy to handle in tight campgrounds sites. Nothing wrong with short beds.
 

steveblonde

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I don't know about all the fuss "short bed, long bed". I have a F250 Super with short bed. I pull a 33Ft fiver. In the front of the bed, I have a combination tool box/fuel tank that holds 60gl of diesel. I have the B&W companion single point, no slider and made more than once a full 90* with no problem at all. Granted, I don't have much room in the bed but can hold cases of water or anything that is below the railing. My tool box sits less than one inch below the railing. Easy to handle in tight campgrounds sites. Nothing wrong with short beds.
Payload capacity
 

steveblonde

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I don't know about all the fuss "short bed, long bed". I have a F250 Super with short bed. I pull a 33Ft fiver. In the front of the bed, I have a combination tool box/fuel tank that holds 60gl of diesel. I have the B&W companion single point, no slider and made more than once a full 90* with no problem at all. Granted, I don't have much room in the bed but can hold cases of water or anything that is below the railing. My tool box sits less than one inch below the railing. Easy to handle in tight campgrounds sites. Nothing wrong with short beds.
A 60 gallon fuel tank, plus hitch and tools and pump and hose already takes more than 1000lbs off the payload capacity which is sizeable
 

richclover

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Short bed works for me. It depends on what you want to load up, weight and the overall size of the truck.
 

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Gary RV_Wizard

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The minimum necessary bed length & wheel base is determined by the trailer front end and its pin box. You want enough distance between the hitch pivot point and the cab so that the front of the trailer can't strike the cab in a sharp turn. Of course, you (the driver) can pay close enough attention to avoid turning that sharp, but that is risky for most of us. An 8 ft box uses a long enough wheelbase to pretty well guarantee you can make 90 degree turns with a strike, but standard (6.5 ft) may not and short (5.5 ft) almost surely does not. Most newer trailers have an extended pin box to help, and many have a V-nose of some sort that allows more cab clearance at the corners.

Be careful with the terminology. Officially these days, "short bed" now refers to the ultra-short 5'6" or 5'9" bed while the 6'6" bed is now called "standard" rather than "short". Most owners, however, still use the old definition of "short".
 

steveblonde

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Box size can mean alot depending on the 5th wheel some like rickglovers the pin box protrudes further out than the nose cone or close to it . some the nose is further back than the pin on the box
Others like mine - the nose cone is almost sticking 2ft further forward than the pin box. On some setups this can be critical.
 

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Gary RV_Wizard

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The brief answer is that an 8 ft bed is the safe choice, but you can be alright with the standard 6'6" bed with some trailers (you will have to measure to be sure).

If a shorter bed length is desired, you can use a slider hitch like the Pullrite SuperGlide or something like the Reese Sidewinder. Those make shorter beds practical with just about any trailer.
 

longhaul

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Dec 21, 2008
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looking at Ford...Ram....GM weight specs shows the same truck in a long bed or short bed with same cab selections same drive train/etc the short bed is lighter on the rear axle and has 95 lbs more actual weight carrying capacity in the bed payload than the long bed.
Example was Fleet Fords base weight specs for a 2wd F350 6.7 super cab in a 148" short bed vs the same F350 6.7 2wd in the 164" long bed had about 95 lbs in favor of the short bed truck.

Long bed trucks are a bit heavier = less payload..... but JMO not enough to worry with.

Ram ....Ford....GM 3/4 and one ton trucks don't use the shorty 5' + bed lengths. Those are reserved for 1/2 ton size LD trucks.
 

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