Wheel chocks

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Darnall4

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Aug 8, 2022
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1
Location
Kentucky
I currently live in my rv. Trying to make things as stable as possible. With that being said trying to add some wheel chokes to help. The tires are too close together to add the ones that I have purchased. Any tricks that will work. Maybe letting some air out of the tires??? Anyone else run into this issue?
 

DutchmenSport

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Oct 30, 2021
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317
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Anderson, Indiana
Put the heaviest, most solid block you can find under each jack and get it as close as you can from the ground to the bottom of the jack. The shorter the jack has to extend (on any RV), the more stable the entire trailer / or camper / or motorhome becomes.

If you want to do a modification, JT Strong Arm is probably the absolute best system going.

Here's a bunch of videos you can watch to see how it works and the effort it takes to install: Click here!
 

Rene T

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May 20, 2011
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Farmington NH
If you want to do a modification, JT Strong Arm is probably the absolute best system going.

Here's a bunch of videos you can watch to see how it works and the effort it takes to install: Click here!
Dutch I’ll have to disagree with you as far a the Strong Arm system. I did a ton of research when I was looking for a system like that. I talked to a guy in a CG I was in who had the Strong Arm. I asked him how he liked it and he said it was better than nothing. he also said the points on the locking “Y” handle kept rounding over and had to be resharpened every so often. He also said there are quite a few mechanical joints in the system and as they wear, the stability is not as good as it was when it was new. Also if you should mount it do that the “T” handle is facing down, it could vibrate out. But when he said it was better than nothing, that got my attention.
I ended up going with the Steady Fast system. It is rock solid front to back and side to side. I can set it up in about 30 seconds.
 
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Kirk

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Oct 30, 2005
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Full-time , Escapee
If you ever expect to tow the trailer again, you need to keep the proper air pressure in the tires or they will be damaged. What I would do is to place one of these under each corner of the RV. It would also help if we knew more about the RV. Noting is going to make it as stabil as a fixed house would be but there are some things that you can do.
61w7Dr+ysOL._AC_UL232_SR232,232_.jpg

If you don't ever plan to move the RV and if the park you are in doen't object, you could also lower the front down as far as possible and then put concrete blocks under the rear as near to the frame as possible. Then raise the front jack to push the fram down aginst the blocks, useing some wood shims as needed to keep it level side to side. Raise the front higher than needed and then place blocks under the frame there so that when you lower the front on to the blocks it will be level from front to back. That should support the RV as solidly as can be done.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Feb 2, 2005
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West Palm Beach, FL
The stability problem is flexing of the axle suspension, which in turn causes the wheels to move forward & back slightly. The best fix is to stop the suspension movement, i.e.put blocks or mechanical jacks under the frame. The locking wheel chocks can usually stop the wheel movement, but they are actually only the second-best method of stabilizing. They are used when the trailer has to be moved often, i.e. are more convenient than fixed jacks such as Kirk pictured. If the trailer isn't moved often, the fixed jacks under the frame are a better solution.
 

HappyWanderer

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Apr 21, 2014
Posts
2,936
I found the screw jacks pictured above to be pretty worthless. They don't really stop movement, so they constantly need to be adjusted. I gave mine away.
 

Kirk

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Oct 30, 2005
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Full-time , Escapee
If he is parking permanently I'd suggest some of the 16" square concrete pads from Lowe's or Home Depot if he is on dirt and at least 12" on gravel.
 

tlmgcamp

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Joined
Jul 16, 2016
Posts
286
If you ever expect to tow the trailer again, you need to keep the proper air pressure in the tires or they will be damaged. What I would do is to place one of these under each corner of the RV. It would also help if we knew more about the RV. Noting is going to make it as stabil as a fixed house would be but there are some things that you can do.
61w7Dr+ysOL._AC_UL232_SR232,232_.jpg

If you don't ever plan to move the RV and if the park you are in doen't object, you could also lower the front down as far as possible and then put concrete blocks under the rear as near to the frame as possible. Then raise the front jack to push the fram down aginst the blocks, useing some wood shims as needed to keep it level side to side. Raise the front higher than needed and then place blocks under the frame there so that when you lower the front on to the blocks it will be level from front to back. That should support the RV as solidly as can be done.
I remember using these back in the 70's camping with the family. Never forgot the time we saw a guy try to stabilize a TT by putting these under the rear bumper (the hollow ones that stored stinky slinky). He called our attention to his mistake when yelling obscenities when the jack punched through the bottom of the bumper
 
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