Windows

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Frozenjoe

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Oct 25, 2018
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We bought a brand new RV Winnebago Vista 31B first trip out and the driver side window smashed out.  We think a stone from park lawn mower but not sure.  Anyways we find the window quality very thin, poor R value.  Im thinking of upgrading the living room window cause it rattles so much and cold air comes thru during cold weather driving.  Any thoughts or opinions?  I hear some people put lexon.
 

John Hilley

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Mar 11, 2009
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Buxton, ND
Was it the side window? I have double pane windows for better R factor. Have replaced the drivers corner window twice and it is filled with water gain. I am looking to replace it with single pane.
 

kdbgoat

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Apr 16, 2014
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Just curious, what is the R factor of double pane windows in an RV?
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I don't have an answer for that, but in general dual panes with just air between the panes will have a R-value about  2x a single pane. The bad news is that a single pane typically has an R-value less than 1,  so it is actually a heat conductor rather than an insulator. According to one article I read on insulating homes, a 1/4" thick single pane typically has an R-value around 0.9.  RV windows are often fairly thin glass as well, and that makes the heat transfer even worse. 
 

John Canfield

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Welcome to the forum Joe. Are your windows double pane in that unit? Like Gary said they don't have much R value, for one point the aluminum frame is a great heat and cold conductor. Double pane windows do help with some sound attenuation so based on that alone I recommend them. If you want to replace windows, that could be very expensive assuming there is a standard replacement size.
 

Mile High

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Oct 17, 2016
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Denver
I don't think RV windows are sealed between panes like a house, but maybe that was just our old Kinros.  I like them for noise reduction, but beyond that I'm not sure they do much.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Many RVs have only single pane glass, so no sealing involved. In those that have dual pane glass, the two glass layers are sealed exactly as in dual pane house windows, but the rigors of travel and leveling an RV are hard on those seals and leakage is common.
 

FunSteak

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Aug 24, 2013
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610
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NE Illinois
I'd not recommend Lexan.  While very strong, it's soft and scratches EASILY.  Plus, unless it's rated for outdoor applications, I think UV would cause crazing and fogging over time. 
 

LarryL60

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Nov 23, 2018
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I would be cautious about replacing anything on a new rig. I wonder if that would void any type of warranty?
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I'd not recommend Lexan.  While very strong, it's soft and scratches EASILY.  Plus, unless it's rated for outdoor applications, I think UV would cause crazing and fogging over time. 
Those are more the properties of Plexiglass (acrylic) than Lexan (a polycarbonate).  Lexan has excellent UV-resistance and color stability and is relatively stiff across a wide temperature range.  It is indeed softer than glass, but much more scratch-resistant than an acrylic like Plexiglass.

That said, replacing the glass with Lexan won't solve any of Frozenjoe's  perceived problems.


While we debate this, Frozenjoe appears to have lost interest or taken his problem elsewhere. He hasn't visited here since posting his original complaint.
 

John Canfield

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Polycarbonate is a fine material for windows, even some other plastics are. When I overhauled my sailboat I had portlights ('windows') made from polycarbonate. Then I through bolted very few inches (with a sealant between the plastic the the portlight opening.) They were exceptionally strong and a perfect material for this application.

I suppose you could use "Lexon" (sic) on an RV but the problem would be how to attach it and I suspect it could get scratched with routine washing.

Yup, our OP bailed out of the thread...
 

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