Wiring RV garage

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GaryB

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Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Posts
223
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Evansville, IN
Hi All,  Along those same lines, I'll be building a new house soon.  I'm thinking a having an RV garage constructed (not allowed to park them outside in my subdivision).  Should I ask the electrician to wire up a special 30-amp or 50-amp outlet inside the RV garage?  In other words, will I need to power up anything while it's sitting in the garage?  If so, what amperage outlet (30, 50, etc.) will I need installed?

The reason I ask is because I don't own an RV yet and never have, but am thinking of getting one within a few years.  So I'd like my garage to be "RV friendly" for when I decide to get one.  I don't have any experience with such things.

Thanks
Gary

 

Carl L

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Mar 14, 2005
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7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
I have a couple of dedicated 20amp circuits in my garage -- one for a freezer and one for power tools.? I just wired in a GFI switch and downstream from it a 30amp RV type outlet.? ? The outlet for the tralier should be switched since a trailer will always plug in under load and an unswitched outlet will cause arcing and can burn your trailers shore power plug.? ?The RV 30 amp outlet is not the same as a standard household 30 amp outlet, so let your electrician know that you want a 30 amp RV unit.? ? Since I rarely run my A/C at home, a 20amp circuit does the job.? ?

50 amp circuits are 240VAC circuits.? ?They require yet another set of plugs and outlets, and much professional wiring.? I leave discussion of 50 amp circuits to the motorhomers around here who deal with them.? ? I am merely trailer trash.
 

Ned

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Feb 1, 2005
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25,107
Location
USA
I would just put in a 30A RV outlet.  Even if your RV is wired for 50A it's unlikely you'll need that much power while it's parked in the garage.  It's much easier and cheaper to wire a 30A outlet than a RV 50A outlet.  Do put either a switch or the circuit breaker near the outlet so you can turn it off while plugging and unplugging, as Carl says.
 

Betty Brewer

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Joined
Mar 10, 2005
Posts
4,775
We are presently having an RV garage built for our motor home and are having 50 amp put into it. If we ever have guests and want to use the RV for them while it is parked in the garage,? I want to? ?have adequate power to run everything.? It may be good for resale on house too.? You can't add it later as easily as during original construction.? Just some things to consider.

Betty Brewer
 

Betty Brewer

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Joined
Mar 10, 2005
Posts
4,775
Karl said:
But how about the sewer, water, electric, wi-fi, cable, and sauna - you know; kind of like Don and Peg have for rv guests??

Well now,
My guests will never be treated with that kind of royalty. (we won't have a sauna :)) But we will have desert heat.

Betty
 

Alaskansnowbirds

Site Team
Joined
Mar 11, 2005
Posts
3,057
Location
Camp Verde, AZ
I agree with Betty. With new construction the electrician only has to run one more wire for 50amp than he has to for 30amp. The 30amp 110v breaker is replaced with a 50amp 220v breaker and the receptacle is differant.

If you do go with 30amp make sure the electrician understands that it is 30amp 110v for a RV. This is differant than what he may be used to wiring in a home for a home clothes dryer or a welder in a shop which is 30amp 220v.

If the electrician isn't familiar with RVs it may confuse him because it is 220v for 50amp but only 110v for 30amp.
 

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