Anyone have experience with Carlisle trailer tires?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.
F

Frizlefrak

Guest
The tires on my fiver are starting to show signs of dry rot....time for a new set.  It has Goodyear Marathons on it now, which are quite pricey.  Wal-mart has them for about $90 apiece, size 205/75R15.  I found these on the Discount Tire website.

http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/findTireDetail.do?rcz=79925&rc=TXEINT&c=1&cf=false&cs=205&pc=47073&rd=15&ar=75&ct=&rf=true

Anyone ever use Carlisle?  The price isn't bad, and it appears to be an equivalent tire. 

All of which leads me to another question....I read on a previous thread that ST designation tires are supposed to have a stiffer sidewall for better trailer handling.  I know some folks use LT tires on their trailers with good results, but is there really all that much difference between and ST tire and a P rated radial (passenger car tire)?  It almost seems like it should be the other way around....cars are subject to the forces encountered during hard cornering, acceleration, etc.  Would using a P radial on a trailer be unsafe, assuming the same size and weight / temp / treadwear rating?

Pep Boys has their basic radial passenger car tires in the same size for considerably less, about $40 per tire.  I checked the weight carrying capacity on them, and it is higher than the ST tire that's currently on the fiver (same size tire).  What gives?  Safety is certainly a primary concern, but are trailer tires really safer than passenger tires, or is this marketing hype?  If they are, so be it, I will spring the extra $100 for ST tires. 

Incidentally, this is on a small (21') fifth wheel.  Total loaded weight, water and everything, would be well under 6000.

Any input is appreciated.
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
All of which leads me to another question....I read on a previous thread that ST designation tires are supposed to have a stiffer sidewall for better trailer handling.  I know some folks use LT tires on their trailers with good results, but is there really all that much difference between and ST tire and a P rated radial (passenger car tire)?  It almost seems like it should be the other way around....cars are subject to the forces encountered during hard cornering, acceleration, etc.  Would using a P radial on a trailer be unsafe, assuming the same size and weight / temp / treadwear rating?

A passenger car tire sits on live axles with differentials and steering mechanisms.  Trailer tires are on dead axles that neither steer nor have turning compensated for.  Next time you make a hard slow speed turn, watch the strange attitudes that your trailer tires assume in your rear view mirror. 

If ST tires are too expensive for your taste, consider LT rated tires instead of P rated.  LT tires have beefed up sidewalls compared to P series and have better load handling.  Yes they ride rougher but then who cares in a trailer.  There are a lot of LT tires around and competition is more likely to keep the price down than with ST tires.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,969
Location
At my Silver Springs FL home
Yes, you can use the P-rated tires if the load capacity is adequate, but myself I would choose the LT's instead. They are closer in design to trailer service (ST) tires.

Carlisles are an inexpensive tire and are often seen on boat & utlity trailers and such.  I don't know that they are"bad" in any sense, but I guess I would get a better grade of tire if I could afford it.  Tire failures on RVs are a common enough prolem without skimping on tire quality.
 

gr8pyrs

Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2006
Posts
22
Location
PA
Just a question on the subject of tires.

It was recommended to me that if a tire goes on my trailer that it might be prudent to change both on that side. Reason being that you cannot determine what kind of overload the "good" tire experienced when the other failed.
Now I know that the duration and time that this single tire was carring the weight would be important here but do you think this thought process has any merit?
 

Shayne

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Posts
4,324
Carlisle tires, I've found, to be vary unreliable should you have problems.  Warranty from them has been a joke in the past in the Midwest and I don't see why it would be any different elsewhere.  At least that has been my experience.  You buy cheap you get cheap.
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
gr8pyrs said:
Just a question on the subject of tires.

It was recommended to me that if a tire goes on my trailer that it might be prudent to change both on that side. Reason being that you cannot determine what kind of overload the "good" tire experienced when the other failed.
Now I know that the duration and time that this single tire was carring the weight would be important here but do you think this thought process has any merit?


Not much, except to pass away the time until the thinker's meds are due next.. 

Tire fails.  Deflates to wheel.  Wheel bares weight former borne by wheel and tire.  Wheel is made of steel or similar high tensile strength metal.  Opposite wheel continues bear same weight as before.  No problemos.
 
F

Frizlefrak

Guest
Thanks for all the tips. 

I think I'm gonna start shopping for LT tires.  The last thing I want is a catastrophic failure of any kind.  I try to limit my towing speed to 65, slower as conditions dictate, but I can't imagine a tire failure being any fun even at those speeds. 

The other issue is durability.  We go boondocking quite frequently, often up washboarded gravel roads that sometimes have sharp rocks.  The LT tires sound like they may be up to the task even better than ST tires.

Again, thanks for all the input.  :)
 

Beginner

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2005
Posts
8
Location
Norfolk Virginia
ST Tires are only rated to 65 MPH.
You Run 65 MPH you have zero safety margin.
Every Forun I have visited, Airstream Foums, Castitaforums, RV forums etc. have a great deal of listings about ST tire failures.
I went, along with others to 16 Inch LT tires.
Beginner
 
Top Bottom