Awning straps and deflappers??

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N Smock

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Mar 9, 2005
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Long Branch, NJ
I am considering the addition of tie down straps and screw anchors for my awning so that I can leave it open when I depart for the day or not get up in the middle of the night to roll it up. Are these a worth while investment?

Additionally I was considering the addition of awning deflappers, are these worth while to spend $$ on?


Thanks
Nelson
 

Ned

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Yes, tiedowns work, but when the wind really pipes up, it makes stowing the awning much more difficult.  We don't use tiedowns any longer and just roll the awning up when leaving if there is any chance of strong winds.
 

Ron

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We are like Ned in that if and when we do put the big awning down we never leave it down while we are away.  We don't really use the big awning that much.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
I carry both but use them only occasionally.  My acrylic fabric awning has stretched as a result of being deployed while we camped on the seashore in constant winds for about 10 days and the deflapper helps take the "belly" out.  As for the seashore experience, the winds were never strong enough to be a danger to the mechanical parts but after several days of being bellowed UP from gusty onshore winds, the fabric was irrevocably stretched. Vinyl is superior to acylic in that regard - it is far less likley to stretch.

As Tom points out, the downside of tie downs is that theycan  make it somewhat more difficult to roll up the awning if a real wind comes along. They do, however, take a lot of strain off the mechanical arms in light to medium winds and stop the annoyng clacking that can occur when little gusts flex the mechanism to and fro.  I use long bungy cords for the strain relief because it provides a bit of shock absorber effect and they can be unhooked quickly if a sudden squal appears.

We had both the deflappers and the strain reliefs on when we deployed the awning for the summer at Camden Hills.
 

Dolphin Jockey

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San Diego
Hi Folks,

I've never used "deflappers" on my awning, and probably never will.  If the wind is so strong that I can't stand the flapping noise it's time to roll up the awning.  I do use an awning strap on occasion but NEVER in the classic way: stretched across the top of the awning and anchored in the ground at either end.

IMHO the purpose of an awning strap is to prevent the awning material from excessive movement.  When attached in the classic way that will help ONLY when the wind blows the awning upward, away from the RV.  Unfortunately the wind is not that regulated and it can blow the awning down just about as easily as up.  When blown down (or towards the RV) the awning strap is of no help.  Secondly, with the awning strap anchored to the ground that could have an adverse effect on the awning and its hardware should the RV ever move for any reason.  And thirdly, I'm not a fan of using springs or bungees, et al, between the awning strap and its anchor points.  The awning strap is installed to prevent excessive movement of the awning.  A spring or bungee will allow the awning to push the strap even further away and that may not be good for the awning.

I solve the problems by using the awning strap to make a "sandwich" with the awning material in the middle.  I fold the strap in half, then pass the folded end over the top of one awning arm (between the arm and the awning material).  Using a D-ring at the fold I anchor that end to the base of the awning rail (where it attaches to the side of my MH) using a web strap and tensioning device.  Then I take the two bitter ends of the strap and pass one over the top of the awning and the other over the bottom of the awning.  Join them together at the opposite end of the awning and pass both over the top of the other awning rail.  Then I use a large S-hook to connect the bitter ends to another web strap and secure it to the base of the other awining rail.  Now the awning strap is anchored to the motorhome and if necessary I could drive it away if I had to.  Additionally, the awning is now better protected from movement in either direction -- up or down.

Next time I set it up I'll take some photos and post them here.
 

BruceinFL

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Took me one time getting up at 3 am during a t'storm in the Keys to roll up the awning. Next day I went immediately and bought a pair of awning deflappers. Use them each time I roll our the awning and haven't had a problem yet. Been very happy with the stability in the wind. However, if a BIG wind was forecast, like a 'cane maybe, I think I'd pull in the awning . <g>
 

Phil

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Mar 5, 2005
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BruceinFL said:
Took me one time getting up at 3 am during a t'storm in the Keys to roll up the awning. Next day I went immediately and bought a pair of awning deflappers. Use them each time I roll our the awning and haven't had a problem yet. Been very happy with the stability in the wind. However, if a BIG wind was forecast, like a 'cane maybe, I think I'd pull in the awning . <g>

Maybe it's time for you to get one of the electric automatic awnings for you rig, Bruce.  :)

Phil
 

BruceinFL

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Maybe it's time for you to get one of the electric automatic awnings for you rig, Bruce.? :)


You've got that right. Unfortunately my new coach already had an unpowered awning or I would have gotten one. Some day.
 

Ned

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BruceinFL said:
You've got that right. Unfortunately my new coach already had an unpowered awning or I would have gotten one. Some day.

Carefree has kits for refitting either Carefree or A&E awnings with electric operation.
 

Ron

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Ned said:
BruceinFL said:
You've got that right. Unfortunately my new coach already had an unpowered awning or I would have gotten one. Some day.

Carefree has kits for refitting either Carefree or A&E awnings with electric operation.

Gee Ned you shoud get one of those refit kits and let us all knoww how they work out. :D
 

BruceinFL

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Ron_Staff said:
Ned said:
BruceinFL said:
You've got that right. Unfortunately my new coach already had an unpowered awning or I would have gotten one. Some day.

Carefree has kits for refitting either Carefree or A&E awnings with electric operation.

Gee Ned you shoud get one of those refit kits and let us all knoww how they work out. :D

Thanks Ron.  ;D
 

Ned

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Ron,

I'm thinking about it.  It's about $960 without the remote control.
 
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