Big Enough?

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Katuzo

Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2006
Posts
7
I was wondering if an RV similiar in size to a Chinook, would be big enough, for a 4 month trip. I really don't want something big, that I would have trouble handling in city traffic. No pets, 2 adults, to be used from approx. 11/15-3/15 in southern USA. I have retirement coming up in 2-3 yrs., and my nephew offered me a room in his house in ME., but just too cold for me in winter. I owe a motorcycle, and have never really driven anything bigger than a small car.
I would also like to tow my motorcycle on occasion, so I could get to ride in different states.
Thanks
Katuzo
 

Bob Buchanan

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 3, 2005
Posts
3,038
Location
Philadelphia, PA
Katuzo said:
I was wondering if an RV similiar in size to a Chinook, would be big enough, for a 4 month trip. I really don't want something big, that I would have trouble handling in city traffic. No pets, 2 adults, to be used from approx. 11/15-3/15 in southern USA. I have retirement coming up in 2-3 yrs., and my nephew offered me a room in his house in ME., but just too cold for me in winter. I owe a motorcycle, and have never really driven anything bigger than a small car.
I would also like to tow my motorcycle on occasion, so I could get to ride in different states.
Thanks
Katuzo

That's a tough one, Katuzo -- as different individuals respond differently to RV size while on the road. The good news about a smaller Class C or larger Class B is that, yes, they are easier to drive in most any situation. The most popular rental RV is the 24' Class C -- such as a Minnie Winnie or equivalent by Fleetwood or other vendors. That rig gives you the best of both worlds in that it has more room and storage, but is also easier to drive than a larger Class A MH.

But "easier to drive" is sometimes an illusion to the beginning RVer. Once you've driven a larger rig, you find there is not much difference -- unless speaking of a much larger Class A rig. Also, some buy a Class B mostly because then they don't have to have a tow vehicle to drive once they have landed somewhere. However, once you have set up, hooked up, done the awning, and so forth -- it takes just as much time and inconvenience to break it all down again to make that trip over to the grocery store. But you plan to take your cycle, so that would do fine for local errands and such. Yes, you could easily add a small trailer for the cycle -- or, attach a hauler to the rear of the rig instead.

My suggestion would be to rent a few RV's for weekend's prior to purchase. Go for something a little larger to see how you feel driving it -- and practice driving in traffic a bit while also backing up and parking in empty parking lots to get the feel of a larger vehicle. Once on the road, especially with more than one person in a rig, larger is most always better. BTW, some rental agencies will apply part of the rental fee towards purchase.

Good luck -- and keep up posted on what you decide.
 

woodartist

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 23, 2006
Posts
563
Location
Wandering the Old West
Good points. I'd like to add that a smaller rig can get into some places that larger ones can't. There are forests where you can get a small 15-21 ft. unit and that is about all. Same concern with slide outs. Remember some parks were designed when the RV was essentially travel trailers. These new "homes on wheels," take a lot of space.... :eek:
 

Ron

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Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Posts
18,082
Location
Home is where we park it
Bob has made some very good suggestions.  Try a couple different rigs out by renting.  Renting is much more economical than trying to change rigs when you find out the one you got doesn't meet your needs.
 

Katuzo

Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2006
Posts
7
But you plan to take your cycle, so that would do fine for local errands and such. Yes, you could easily add a small trailer for the cycle -- or, attach a hauler to the rear of the rig instead.

What exactly is a hauler? I was hoping to find something big enough to be a snowbird, and yet small enough to go to the city to visit museums and see shows.

Also, I looked up in the library, the RV Guide?, would a RT also be considered an SB, but better built?
 
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