Choosing Tow Vehicle

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midnightscape

Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2006
Posts
12
I've read through alot of the posts in this section and I think I'm more confused than when I started.

I'm currently looking for a truck to pull my TT that is noted on the badge as 7000 lbs. 3500 front 3500 rear. I have no idea on the tongue weight, how to figure it out, or what all the GVWR, GCWR or whatever the letters are. Is there a crash course (glossary) on these terms? Can someone lend a little hand-holding while I try to choose a correct tow vehicle that will be safe for me and my family?

Thanks,
Jason
 

Shayne

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Jan 22, 2006
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Jason  Carl will probably be in here soon and He's the guy you want to listen too.  Oops  Sorry  Gary too  What ever they recommend I would adhere too
 

Carl L

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Mar 14, 2005
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7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
midnightscape said:
I've read through alot of the posts in this section and I think I'm more confused than when I started.

I'm currently looking for a truck to pull my TT that is noted on the badge as 7000 lbs. 3500 front 3500 rear. I have no idea on the tongue weight, how to figure it out, or what all the GVWR, GCWR or whatever the letters are. Is there a crash course (glossary) on these terms? Can someone lend a little hand-holding while I try to choose a correct tow vehicle that will be safe for me and my family?

The fist thing you need is the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).? That should be listed on the DOT plate which you seem to have found.? I suspect that 7000 lbs is the number, but the plate should identify the number.? Give that number a bit of safety factor:? 10% in the flat part of the US;? 20% in the mountain and Pacific west.? ?For a GVWR of 7000 lbs, the safety factors would give you 7,800 lbs or 8,750 lbs respectively.

Then go to the Trailer Life Tow Rating Tables at http://www.trailerlife.com/output.cfm?id=42175.? Look for a truck that has a tow rating equal to or greater than the appropriate factored weight.

OK?
 

midnightscape

Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2006
Posts
12
Carl Lundquist said:
The fist thing you need is the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).? That should be listed on the DOT plate which you seem to have found.? I suspect that 7000 lbs is the number, but the plate should identify the number.? Give that number a bit of safety factor:? 10% in the flat part of the US;? 20% in the mountain and Pacific west.? ?For a GVWR of 7000 lbs, the safety factors would give you 7,800 lbs or 8,750 lbs respectively.

Then go to the Trailer Life Tow Rating Tables at http://www.trailerlife.com/output.cfm?id=42175.? Look for a truck that has a tow rating equal to or greater than the appropriate factored weight.

OK?

Great, thanks for the link to the tables! Glad I asked, the F150's I've been looking at are a little under rated. Looks like I'll need to bump up to a F250 or Dodge 2500 if I go older or the 04 F150 or Ram 1500 will work. I just worry about having a 3/4 ton for a daily driver (as I'm only a weekend camper) and the gas I'll be paying for my 60 mile commute every day.

Jason
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
The ride difference between a 150 and a 250 is not all that significant, certainly not on decent pavement.  As far as commuting is concerned, I can offer no solice.  Back in the dear old days of $1.50 gas, I commuted 11 miles each way in a E350 with a 460 7.5 L V8 with a Carter 4bbl.
Fillups at the end of the week were painful.  Fortunately for me, I was senior enough to get company parking.  What can I say, if you want to tow, you get big engined pickups.  If you want to commute you get gas sipping hatchbacks or hybrids.
 

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