Class C Tires

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Kevin_Texas

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Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Posts
10
Hello From Texas,

Got question for you folks.. I own a 2009 Dutchman 32' Class C motorhome. The sticker on the driver side states that the GAWR Rear weight is(9,500 LB) shows required tires to be LT225/75 16E.  The current tires on the motorhome now are MICHELIN? LTX? M/S2 I looked them up and they show to handle 2470@80PSI for dual load. That would mean 9,880 total load. This cannot be good for my weight. So are my tires underatted. 
 
The weight of rv is at the max of tires... Should that not be a conern... Should there some buffer...I have had two blowouts in 18 months...
 
Kevin_Texas said:
The weight of rv is at the max of tires... Should that not be a conern... Should there some buffer...I have had two blowouts in 18 months...
Have you actually weighed your MH?  The GAWR is max, not actual.  If you are blowing tires, maybe you are overloaded.
 
Had a fifth wheel and two blow outs, when to a higher rated tire and no more blow outs! Bite the bullet!
 
Molaker said:
Have you actually weighed your MH?  The GAWR is max, not actual.  If you are blowing tires, maybe you are overloaded.

Thanks Molaker... Makes since... I will get it weighed...
 
Kevin_Texas said:
Thanks Molaker... Makes since... I will get it weighed...
Good move you have to know what it weighs and it is best to do all 4 corners front and back are ok but you get a better idea with all 4.
Bill
 
I would be concerned enough to do some checking, starting with an actual weight, but not actually alarmed. If the rear axle actual weight turns out to be much above 9000 lbs, I would be looking to get a slightly higher capacity tire when replacement time comes around. Meanwhile, I would be running those tires at their max load inflation (as shown on the sidewall) and checking every few days to make sure they stayed there. Even a few psi of underinflation can be fatal when a tire is heavily loaded.
 
Yes do weigh your RV for sure and adjust accordingly. But the weight limits set for anything including tires is not at a fail limit, most everything is rated at about 50% of the failing limits. All this means is that you do not have any problems at the rated max as long as you do keep up pressures. And of course run what ever makes one feel comfortable.
 
In addition to the advice given. When one of a pair of duals fails, the other tire is subjected to double the load. This can result in premature failure of that tire. It is not uncommon for folks to get into a cycle of one tire failure after another by only replacing one tire of a pair after a blowout.

For those that like verification of such statements, here is a quote from this article: "When one truck tire fails, that's only the beginning of the problem. If the driver doesn't stop immediately, the remaining tire of that pair becomes overloaded. In short order this will damage the tire's internal components. Because of the safety margin built into tires, the remaining tire probably won't come apart until after it receives a new mate. But it's like a hand grenade with the pin pulled: It's just a matter of time before it blows. If it's a trailer tire, it may be many months before it fails. The trailer can sit unused or is employed to carry light loads. But the next time that tire experiences a 110-degree day with a legal-limit load aboard, a new road gator will enter the world. If the driver doesn't stop immediately, its mate-the replacement for the original blown tire-will suffer terminal damage. And the cycle will repeat itself."
 
Kevin:
For what it's worth, I have Transforce HT's on my 24 foot Class C. The ride has far less mush and sway to it and I'm glad I switched to them.


Expensive, but after repairing blowout damage on the left rear... worth it.





 

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