Clint Eastwood Saga....New Tow Vehicle

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dlshunter

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Posts
162
Location
Modesto, CA
The Good...
We sold the 2003 Chevy 2500 CCSB 4x4 that we had for 16 years.
Bought a 2022 Denali HD.

The Bad...
Hitch plate is now way higher in new truck...has Puck System (not bad, just expensive for the mounting piece)

The Ugly...
When hitched, 5er looks like an A380 at Vr yet failing too get airborne...dragging it's tail.


Looks like I can get by with 1-2 inches of pinbox movement, but leaves me 3-ish inches shy of beginning to look level.
I have seen many posts where 5er RVers will add blocks to the spring & axle junction, or...
Use a spring dropping kit.

Which do you recommend? And why?
 
The Good...
We sold the 2003 Chevy 2500 CCSB 4x4 that we had for 16 years.
Bought a 2022 Denali HD.

The Bad...
Hitch plate is now way higher in new truck...has Puck System (not bad, just expensive for the mounting piece)

The Ugly...
When hitched, 5er looks like an A380 at Vr yet failing too get airborne...dragging it's tail.


Looks like I can get by with 1-2 inches of pinbox movement, but leaves me 3-ish inches shy of beginning to look level.
I have seen many posts where 5er RVers will add blocks to the spring & axle junction, or...
Use a spring dropping kit.

Which do you recommend? And why?
Are your trailer axles mounted above the springs? If so, you might look at putting them under the springs.
 
I would have thought a 2022 trailer would have been despatched with the correct axle/spring set up but we all know that doesn't always happen.
You don't say what tow vehicle you are using or whether it's had any modifications, how the hitch is set or what bed rail clearance there is between the truck and the trailer.
With this information you should get much better response.
 
I would have thought a 2022 trailer would have been despatched with the correct axle/spring set up but we all know that doesn't always happen.
You don't say what tow vehicle you are using or whether it's had any modifications, how the hitch is set or what bed rail clearance there is between the truck and the trailer.
With this information you should get much better response.
2022 Denali HD
 
You can lift the trailer by (maybe) repositioning the springs on the axle or adding blocks, but remember you are making the trailer even more top-heavy than it already was. Lowering the truck is a better solution but I don't know if there is a standard kit or procedure for lowering the GMC Denali HD.

You want to get at least close to trailer-level but you also need to maintain adequate clearance between trailer and the truck side rails. 6" clearance is desirable but many late model truck/5W combos live with 3-4" and have to be cautious about side tilt when maneuvering on uneven terrain.
 
Trailer mfg's/trailer axle mfg's don't offer suspension blocks as OEM or a option for very good reasons.
Biggest is side stress issues while turning/backing maneuvers on U bolts/spring keepers and top plates shearing those long U bolts.

Most folks go with a sub frame between the spring hangers and main frame rails. Very stable.
However keep in mind 13' 6" is max height. Don't want the roof mounted A/C sheared off at a 13' 6" bridge or low canopy at the fuel station.
 
Look at a different pin box for the 5er.
"Flipping the axles" leads to a higher center of gravity and ill handling. Lowering a Denalli is expensive - lowering kits are inexpensive but the labor will kill you. A pin box is cheap $1000-$2500 depending on your needs thats including labor to install
 
Look at a different pin box for the 5er.
"Flipping the axles" leads to a higher center of gravity and ill handling. Lowering a Denalli is expensive - lowering kits are inexpensive but the labor will kill you. A pin box is cheap $1000-$2500 depending on your needs thats including labor to install
Probably more complicated as the Denali is top of the line and probably has gadgets to work around such as auto suspension height and the like. I haven't looked at GM products in some years, so no idea what may or may not be present.

Also noteworthy if it's 4WD or AWD, even more expensive/complicated. Most of the "economical" drop kits are exclusive to 2WD. Depending on the truck, a rear drop may end up being more than a shackle or flip kit. That is, requiring some frame notching or other more extensive mods.

No mention if it's a stock configuration or a mall crawler. If the latter, that could be the root of the problem, being already lifted 3" by some awesome off-road tires and whatnot.
 
Another option would be to remove the truck bed and put a flat bed on it. Not to terribly expensive.
You mean other than removing the $4000 truck bed and just doing away with it and spending another $3000 to drop a flatbed on the chassis?
 
My Silverado has the nose of my fifth wheel higher than desired but it tows fine. Several good ideas posted. Plan D would be buy a taller trailer.
 
My Silverado has the nose of my fifth wheel higher than desired but it tows fine. Several good ideas posted. Plan D would be buy a taller trailer.
Or raise the trailer on the axles…maybe flip from under axles to springs mounted over. Just a thought. Mine is a bit nose high too. No problems
 

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