discovering new plumbing

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Gizmo100

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While prepping for our 1st trip I found water leaking from the outside shower. Unfortunately the water was leaking inside the TT under the kitchen cabinets. I pulled out the drawers to dry out the area with towels. I found a piece of waterline unattached to anything. I traced it around to the water line coming out of the water tank.

I'm guessing the line could/would be used to pump RV Antifreeze into the pump and plumbing. Any thoughts??

On the bright side....The water leak was an easy fix. loose connection on the hose coming off the shower manifold.     
 

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Lou Schneider

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Yes, the pink stain on the end of the line is a tipoff.  If you follow it up, it should go to a Tee valve on the inlet of the water pump.  Turn it one way and the pump can suck antifreeze through the hose out of a gallon jar or bucket and send it through the water lines.

If there's no tee valve, you'll have to disconnect the inlet line after you drain the tank and connect the hose to the pump inlet.
 

Rene T

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Agree with Lou. The line you have in your hand from the water tank has a valve. To suck antifreeze out of a jug, you'll need to shut that valve. Then the line that is open ended with the pink stain also has a valve. You'll need to open that valve. Then just put them hose in a gallon jug, start the pump and the it will suck antifreeze out of the jug and send it throughout the water system.
 

Gizmo100

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Thanks....I was happy to find this...it will make winterizing a lot easier.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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It could also be a simple fresh tank vent - it has to have one somewhere.  If the line goes to a tee near the pump, it has to have a shut-off valve or the pump sucks air instead of water.  If it just goes to the top of the tank, it is a vent. Will also become an overflow if you forget and overfill the tank.
 

Gizmo100

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I'm bringing this thread back to life...

I'm wondering if I adapted a fitting on the end of this line, could I use it to blow out the lines with air instead of anti freeze.
My concerns;

Will the pump allow enough air to pass though to do the job?
Could the air cause damage to the pump? ( My thought is yes..But I'm not sure.)

Pro's
This point of entry worked very well with the anti freeze. I'm thinking it would do do the same with air.
The pump would also get blown out.


 

Lou Schneider

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Don't try blowing air through the pump using the antifreeze connection.  It's on the intake side of the pump and the pump can suck from it's intake but not have anything blown through it.  It won't work and you'll damage the pump.  You do want to use that hose to suck some antifreeze through the pump and it's immediate lines, though.  Then you can use an adapter that screws into the city water fill to blow out the rest of the system.  The city water fill enters the water system after the pump so you aren't pushing air through it.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Camco-Brass-Blow-Out-Plug-for-RV-Winterizing-Helps-Clear-the-Water-Lines-in-Your-RV-During-Winterization-and-Dewinterization-36153/23529548

There's also a version using a quick-disconnect fitting for greater airflow:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Camco-36143-Blow-Out-Plug-for-RV-Winterizing/29764314
 

Gizmo100

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Lou Schneider said:
Don't try blowing air through the pump using the antifreeze connection.  It's on the intake side of the pump and the pump can suck from it's intake but not have anything blown through it.  It won't work and you'll damage the pump.  You do want to use that hose to suck some antifreeze through the pump and it's immediate lines, though.  Then you can use an adapter that screws into the city water fill to blow out the rest of the system.  The city water fill enters the water system after the pump so you aren't pushing air through it.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Camco-Brass-Blow-Out-Plug-for-RV-Winterizing-Helps-Clear-the-Water-Lines-in-Your-RV-During-Winterization-and-Dewinterization-36153/23529548

There's also a version using a quick-disconnect fitting for greater airflow:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Camco-36143-Blow-Out-Plug-for-RV-Winterizing/29764314

I was really hoping you wouldn't say that.....But I was thinking the same thing regarding the pump
Any suggestions for the pump that won't involve antifreeze..This time of year we may travel in and out of freezing temperatures.

I have the adapter to blow out the lines...But I like the quick disconnect fitting...I may need to upgrade.

Thanks Lou
 

Lou Schneider

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Gizmo100 said:
Any suggestions for the pump that won't involve antifreeze..This time of year we may travel in and out of freezing temperatures.

Most water pumps are inside the RV.  If yours is (I see vinyl flooring in your picture), just leave the inside cabinet door open so warm interior air can circulate around the pump.

Same for the rest of the plumbing inside the RV.
 

kdbgoat

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Just use the fill adapter that was like linked. Run the pump for about 20-30 seconds. Make sure you blow air through all hosesand fittings. Don't forget the outside shower and low point drains.
 

Gizmo100

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I'm thinking maybe using a 60 watt light bulb in the compartment with the water pump when we're not using the TT. and blowing out the rest of the plumbing. We don't get a lot of freezing temps down here in SE Alabama. I just like to be prepared.
 

Rene T

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kdbgoat said:
Just use the fill adapter that was like linked. Run the pump for about 20-30 seconds. Make sure you blow air through all hosesand fittings. Don't forget the outside shower and low point drains.

And if you have a flusher, blow air through it also. many people forget to do that.
 

John From Detroit

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I doubt you would damage the pump if you keep it below 50 PSI but... WHY

You can buy an adapter to blow via the city inlet. in fact they make a couple diferent ones one is the size of a valve stem and the other is a popular 'quick connect" (fits the connector for tools on the hose)

THen open. inspect and drain the inlet strainer Lay a towel down to collect the drippings

And run the pump for like 30 seconds to a minute to clear the pump and it's outlet line.

Job done. No need to "Cobble" anything. also if you "Cobble" this leaves weater in the city connection you need to blow it out too.t he method I cited leves you with just the ice maker to clear. and that too is easy (Do multiple blows and force cycle the ice maker after the first blow.. OR remove the solenoid to indoor storage. your choice.. I coudl not find the [email protected](@*#&$ solnoid come spring and had to buy a new one .
 

Gizmo100

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John From Detroit said:
I doubt you would damage the pump if you keep it below 50 PSI but... WHY

You can buy an adapter to blow via the city inlet. in fact they make a couple diferent ones one is the size of a valve stem and the other is a popular 'quick connect" (fits the connector for tools on the hose)

THen open. inspect and drain the inlet strainer Lay a towel down to collect the drippings

And run the pump for like 30 seconds to a minute to clear the pump and it's outlet line.

Job done. No need to "Cobble" anything. also if you "Cobble" this leaves weater in the city connection you need to blow it out too.t he method I cited leves you with just the ice maker to clear. and that too is easy (Do multiple blows and force cycle the ice maker after the first blow.. OR remove the solenoid to indoor storage. your choice.. I coudl not find the [email protected](@*#&$ solnoid come spring and had to buy a new one .
My goal is a quick winterize as needed. We have a trip in the planning stage for mid-Feb. for AZ. The plan is to stay south on I-10. I doubt we have any issues but Mother Nature can always throw a curve when you least expect one.
I do have the city adapter to blow out lines and a compressor on board. (Thanks Santa)  My concerns with the pump would be when we are home and not using the TT. We get freezing temp's once in a while so I'm thinking the light bulb would be a quick simple fix,

When blowing out the lines I would not exceed 50 PSI
No ice maker so no problems there

Rene T said:
And if you have a flusher, blow air through it also. many people forget to do that.
I assume you mean Black tank flusher - Don't have one
 
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