Fridge: how much levelling is necessary ?

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dann

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Nov 21, 2005
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Hi. Just got my first motorhome. I read that letting the fridge  more than 6 degrees off-levelling ( horizont.) can damage it . How many degrees are allowed without damage ? I mean for a long period. Thanks
 

Jim Dick

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Hi Dann,

That 6 degrees is, I believe, only in one direction. I think the other is 3 degress. Check your owners manual. I would think if you're very close to level and well within the limits you might be OK. The general feeling I've heard is if you feel comfortable standing in the RV then it's probably level enough. I'm sure that "feeling" will be within the limits of the refer. If you are storing the unit and the refer is turned off then it doesn't make any difference how level it is.

Be sure you are looking at the refer from the right perspective. Front to back level on the refer is really side to side on the coach.
 

dann

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Thanks Jim. You're very right about the perspective. I had not thought of that.
Dann
 
A

Albslb2

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After years of leveling MH and campers, I've gotten to the point of almost knowing when it's level, especially in our MH.  I open the bathroom door and when it doesn't swing one way or the other, It's level.  I've tried this so many times I can't remember. I've checked it time and time abain and now seldom ever check.  That door will move with the slightest out of alinement.  Try it for yourself and see.  At least it works for me. may not for you.  Got up 1 AM and the door wouldn't stay in posistion, check the level, sure enough out of kilter, one jack had sunk in the ground a bit.  I forgot to place a pad under jack and ground was a wee bit soft.  Good luck and happy motoring.
 

Len and Jo

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We find that 0 to +2 degrees for-aft is a limit for us.  We sleep with our heads to the rear of the vehicle and +2 is just a equal to a thicker pillow.  We do not like the real below level (ie: -0 degrees).  Side to side though is -1 to +1 for Joanne.  For me +2 to -1 is even better since at +2 I roll towards Joanne ;)
 

Carl L

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Ron said:
As I recall Jim is correct level should be within 6 degrees front to back and 3 degrees side to side.?

If you have an 8 foot (96 inch) wide trailer that 6? leveling factor would be 10 inches.  The 3? on, say, a trailer measuring 20 feet from the pivot point between the axles would equal 12 inches.

Now I do not know about you, but I have never had to correct my trailer 10 inches laterally.  My block set will only raise the trailer 3 inches laterally, and they have always done the job.

In short, refrigerator leveling is not an issue if you are reasonably careful in general leveling for comfort.
 

Ron

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Three degrees side to side. six degrees front to rear.  That is probably why some say if it is comfortable to live in it is probably close enough.
 

Bob Buchanan

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dann said:
Hi. Just got my first motorhome. I read that letting the fridge? more than 6 degrees off-levelling ( horizont.) can damage it . How many degrees are allowed without damage ? I mean for a long period. Thanks

Hello dann . . .

As most have posted, I too go for "feeling" level -- tho I keep one of those bubble in the center levels in my frig -- and check it each time I level. I don't have auto leveling so putting the 2X8's in the right spots can be a chore at times.

About a year ago, I had to have my frig replaced. The former owner didn't pay as much attention to keeping level as I have since. Just replacing the coils cost me around $900. My point is a word of caution. Make sure that what feels good "is" actually within the 3 and 6 degree limits.

An RV frig is a chemically operated device with few moving parts. Chemicals are heated at the bottom, rise as they go from liquid to vapor to the top where they are condensed, then drop back down to the bottom via gravity to start the process all over again. The key word here is, gravity. The more off level, the less effect gravity has on the movement from the top back down to the bottom. If off level too far, movement is slowed causing less effectiveness of the heat transfer process, and more importantly, clogging will happen. One of the chemicals is a rust inhibitor that must stay properly mixed. If flow is retarded, it separates and rusts begins. This causes little holes to form -- and the inhibitor begins to seep through. From there it is all down hill to the repair shop.  :(
 

Carl L

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To handle the actual leveling chore, I use plastic interlocking blocks to raise the pair of wheels on the low side and the hitch jack to level fore and aft.    Because the chore is done entirely outside of the trailer, I have stick-on levels:  one on the front of the trailer for lateral leveling;  the other on the side of the trailer near the front for fore and aft leveling.

To install the levels, I first leveled the trailer on a flat stretch of pavement with a carpenter's level inside the refrigerator.  With the trailer so leveled, I stuck the two adhesive levels on the trailer with their bubbles centered.  The levels are still stuck on the trailer after 8 years of travel, and they still hold the proper level.
 

Ron

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dann said:
Thanks again to everyone. That's what I call a true response.
Dann

You are welcome Dann.  We are glad we could provide you with the information you were looking for.  Thanks for the complement.
 

Len and Jo

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I have attached an Excel spreed sheet showing amount of leveling required for the amount the RV pad is out of flat.  The amount of angle the RV is out of flat is the same for a  large Class 'A' or a small Class 'B'.  That is 3 degrees out of flat is 3 degrees out of flat no matter the rig style.  You should feel the same level discomfort (or comfort?) no matter what your rig is.  The big difference comes in when you are trying to level the rig.  30-40 feet between lift points means alot more then 10-20 feet between lift points.  In our 'B' we have had to level 3-4 inches some times.  In a large 'A' that could translate into leveling 6-8 inches fore-aft.
 

Attachments

  • OUT OF LEVEL.xls
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Brad

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I just bought a new Travel Trailer and was told by the dealer that some of the new fridges, including mine, are not vulnerable to damage due to being unlevel.
 

Carl L

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Brad said:
I just bought a new Travel Trailer and was told by the dealer that some of the new fridges, including mine, are not vulnerable to damage due to being unlevel.

Maybe.  However, the credibility of RV sales people is not of the highest around here.  Fridges are a lot less vulnerable to level miseries than the older ones but that has been true for the best part of a decade.  In any case, the degree of leveling that makes you comfortable in the trailer should do for the fridge -- but do level.
 

Ron

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Brad said:
I just bought a new Travel Trailer and was told by the dealer that some of the new fridges, including mine, are not vulnerable to damage due to being unlevel.

Like Carl mentioned you just can't trust salesman to tell you anything but what they perceive you want to hear in order to make the sale.  Although the fridges now days are not as sensitive as the ones a decade or more ago they need to be somewhat level. I strongly recommend you level as Carl suggested using a level.  Basically 6 degrees front to rear and 3 degrees side to side is the very maximum out of level condition today's fridges will tolerate.
 
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