Highwater Coach?

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JackInAZ

Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Posts
8
After taking delivery of our 2012 Itasca Suncruiser 37F and comparing other gas models, I realized ours must be higher off the ground than any other gas model I've seen.  More specifically, it measures on level terrain (with levelers extended) to 23" from coach to ground.  As typical with other Winnebago products we've owned, I had to place a 4-inch drop hitch and 12-inch safety cable extensions  to place our toad within the recommended "safety zone" for towing.  Since I was concerned about this "high water" coach, I called Winnebago and asked if this was normal.  At first all I got was a "Yep" and then he explained that the 37F has a larger chassis (Ford F53 24,000 lb) and larger wheels (measures 36 inch diameter) and that accounts for the distance from body to ground level.

Still, I am concerned with this.  I realize diesels set low to the ground when air bags are deflated, but this gas model coach frankly looks weird with its high posture. Am I being overly concerned about this?  Anyone else have the 37F Suncruiser and been concerned as well?
 
I looked online at some photos of similar units, hard to tell if it's the same chassis but assuming it is it doesn't look dangerous from what I can see at least.  Our rig sits a bit high too, I use a drop shank to tow our ATV and boat trailer level, never felt unsafe with it.
 
Count yourself luck Jack.  Having a heavier chassis on a gas coach is a blessing. More CCC, bigger tires generally give a better ride, and the higher CCC usually also means bigger holding tanks. If I had a gas coach I would want one like yours.
 
Does the heavier 24 GVW chassis provide significant handling improvements compared to the 22 GVW?  Also, does the additional 20" wheelbase on a coach that is about 2 feet longer make a big difference?  It improves the wheelbase length ratio but I don't know if that is as important in gassers.        
 
The longer wheel  base is a plus for a long coach like the 37F; in fact it is almost a necessity for good balance. And the extra 2000 lbs of GVWR is a plus too. A longer wheel base usually rides a bit smoother as well, another plus.

JackinAZ: Nothing to worry about. Your coach has 22.5" wheels, which is by no means unusual for gas chassis in a 34+ foot length. You may be used to seeing smaller or older rigs that had 16" or 19.5" wheels, but 22.5" is common on the heavier duty gas chassis and has been since Workhorse introduced their W22 series chassis back in 2001. Heavier coaches need heftier wheels & tires to support them adequately.  Nor is it unusual to require a modest drop hitch on a larger coach chassis.
 
At the risk of showing my ignorance, Sarge, what is CCC ?

SargeW said:
More CCC, bigger tires generally give a better ride, and the higher CCC usually also means bigger holding tanks.
 
See the RV Glossary (button in menu bar) for terms like that. 

To add to the terminology problem, measurement standards change.  CCC replaced NCC, only to be in turn replaced by OCCC. All this is explained in the Gloosary.
 
JackInAZ said:
At the risk of showing my ignorance, Sarge, what is CCC ?

Although Gary is exactly correct, CCC is "Cargo Carrying Capacity".  It was a revised term by the RV industry to narrow down a broader term.  It refers to just the cargo that can be loaded into the rig, exclusive of the stuff that the manufacture puts in when built. 
 
It refers to just the cargo that can be loaded into the rig, exclusive of the stuff that the manufacture puts in when built. 

Uh, not exactly. CCC excludes water and propane and passengers too, and those aren't "stuff the manufacturer puts in".

http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php?action=Glossary#Cargo%20Carrying%20Capacity
 
The newest term, the federally-mandated OCCC, is pretty close to what you described. So was the original NCC, but the RVIA tried to improve things by segregating loaded weight into actual "cargo" vs water, propane and people and came up with "CCC". Well meant, but not really any better overall. You still have to  understand all the weights you, the owner, add to an RV and few bother to learn, let alone keep good track of changes.
 
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