How to power up rv refrigerator in my shop

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tlshaw31

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Feb 15, 2019
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Hello guys i have a 2014 norcold rv fridge i want to sale,  was working when i took it out of my dads rv.  I am now selling it for him.  but want to be able to test it in the shop for perspective buyers before they purchase it
does anyone know how this is done,  i plugged it into 110 but not even light comes on.

Thanks for help
Tom
 

Isaac-1

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It needs 12V DC from a battery to run the control board, then also either propane or 120V AC to operate the flame or heating element for the boiler section.

Also be aware RV refrigerators take several hours to cool down, so you may want to start it cooling the day before the potential buyer is going to come see it.
 

John From Detroit

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As stated you need 12 volts at as I recall around 3 or 5 amps I'd go with a 7 amps supply
and 120 volts OR Propane (or both)

IF you are not worried about mains power fail (I am) you can get a power supply from some place like Giga Parts or DXEngineering or ... if you have a radio shack nearby  they have a 7 amps job. NOTE the ones from the suppliers (GIGA PARTS and DX Engineering) are very high quality

Or if you ARE worried about mains power fail. a Battery and small (Very small) converter and a then you need propane to back up the AC Mains.

NOTE this is not really that great a deal.
RV cooling unit (Fridge) draws about 350 watts cooling (Figure 50% duty)
Small "Dorm/Office" unit (Often on sale for like $100) 100 watts
High effiency "Danfoss" type 30-50 watts

Though you may think you are getting a deal.. it won't take long for that puppy to suck up 100 dollars worth of Power.

Story: Some years ago the Red WIngs (Detroit hocky club) were in the finals. they lost the finals (They made it all the way there. for the 3rd time in a row) I picked up a dorm/office fridge list price 450 dollars. Redwing Logo (which went well with the decor where I was working) for 100 bucks.  Low power consumption. bigger than what it replaced. NICE.
 

kdbgoat

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John, he just wanted to run it to demonstrate that it works in an attempt to sell it. He's not using for a garage fridge.
 

IBTripping

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Isaac-1 said:
It needs 12V DC from a battery to run the control board, then also either propane or 120V AC to operate the flame or heating element for the boiler section.

Also be aware RV refrigerators take several hours to cool down, so you may want to start it cooling the day before the potential buyer is going to come see it.

So, OP could use a 12 volt battery to run the control board. And, to keep the battery charged, he could simultaneously attach a battery charger to the battery. Then plug in the refrigerator to 110 volt ac. Correct?
 

Rene T

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IBTripping said:
So, OP could use a 12 volt battery to run the control board. And, to keep the battery charged, he could simultaneously attach a battery charger to the battery. Then plug in the refrigerator to 110 volt ac. Correct?

Yes you are right but you also need to connect it to a small propane tank
 

spdracr39

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It doesn't require propane to cool from 120v side. He would only need propane to demonstrate that the propane side works. That would be a little more complicated.
 

Rene T

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spdracr39 said:
It doesn't require propane to cool from 120v side. He would only need propane to demonstrate that the propane side works. That would be a little more complicated.

Tell me how does he proves that it works on propane unless he hooks it up to propane. Not difficult at all.
 

kdbgoat

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Agree^^, hose and regulator from a grill, and maybe a fitting to attach.
 

Lou Schneider

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Rene T said:
Yes you are right but you also need to connect it to a small propane tank

... using an 11" WC regulator.  Connecting the 0.4 PSI refrigerator inlet directly to a 80-120 PSI propane tank or disposable cylinder would give some very interesting results.
 

Chakara

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Be fair Rene - to do so he is going to have to adapt a propane source to the fridge.  Not hard, but also a "thing" to get done....

-Kyle
 

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