Kilts, haggis and habits

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Tom

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Karl said:
I know he said he doesn't do haggis.

I don't do kilts either Karl. But Jim has a custom-made one that fits him pretty good.
 

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thenosyone

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Tom said:
I don't do kilts either Karl. But Jim has a custom-made one that fits him pretty good.

I had the idea Tom is Welsh    No kilt no Haggis other habits there.
Thenosyone
 

Tom

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thenosyone said:
Welsh No kilt no Haggis other habits there.

You're misinformed Thenosyne. Many Welshmen wear kilts. Here's one explanation of the history. However, you're right that they don't eat haggis.
 

thenosyone

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Tom said:
You're misinformed Thenosyne. Many Welshmen wear kilts. Here's one explanation of the history. However, you're right that they don't eat haggis.

Point  taken, what about the habits?
 

Tom

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I usually post some things around March 1, the celebration of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales. Meanwhile, here's some reading for you on Welsh customs.
 

thenosyone

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Tom said:
I usually post some things around March 1, the celebration of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales. Meanwhile, here's some reading for you on Welsh customs.

Funny, at this moment I have a Scottish guest in my house...  Glasgow.
She didn't know about Welsh wearing a kilt...  She wants to known what collars they are?          green? 
I known, well I think to known the design and colors in Scotland are related to the different "clans"  Same in Wales?
 

Tom

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thenosyone said:
She wants to known what collars they are? green? ..... in Scotland are related to the different "clans" Same in Wales?

This web site shows that the different colors or tartans are related to different last names.
 

thenosyone

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Good idea Tom to make a spin off

I was already thinking, we are far away from the subject.... just as with "Hi from Bert"

On Habits, something about us.

So, we are Flemish,  the Dutch speaking part of Belgium.  We are known for  hospitality and enjoying life.
No kilts are haggis overhere. However we eat a lot off stuff what the "normal" English would not put in his mouth.
A very favored dish is mussels with French fries (chips?) Don't known why the English always refere to the as French fries, because we do eat a lot more of them than the French.
Personally I am a steak man.

Some fellow Europeans, especially the ones who live north of us make jokes off us as we would be not very clever.
What must makes us close and very similar to the Irish.
 

Tom

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thenosyone said:
A very favored dish is mussels with French fries (chips?)

Mussels are in the diet of Welshmen also. They're a favorite of mine and I have fond memories of picking our own mussels from the rocks at the seaside. But I've never eaten them with any kind of potato. Here's a couple of photos of me eating mussels with other forum members. The first photo is with Gary Brinck at a campground in Maine (Gary steamed the mussels). The second photo is with Jim Dick when he and his wife Pat visited our home.

the English always refere to the as French fries

They don't, or at least they didn't when I lived there. People in the UK call them "chips", while people in the U.S. call them French fries. Like you, I have no idea why they're called that. Do the French eat them?
 

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Karl

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Tom,

Re: haggis - I didn't really think anyone, Welsh, Scottish, or otherwise actually ATE the bloody things ;D - more ceremonial than anything. Not that there's anything wrong with them; just not your 'normal' bill of fare. Heck, if people knew what went into chorizo, its' popularity may decline too. On the other hand, we do eat hot dogs.... ::)
 

Tom

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Karl said:
I didn't really think anyone, Welsh, Scottish, or otherwise actually ATE the bloody things

Any true-blooded Scotsman would let you know they do Karl.

we do eat hot dogs

In parts of Asia that would be a real woof-woof type dog. Best not to ask what they're serving you when they give you the local delicacy.
 

thenosyone

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Karl said:
Tom,

Re: haggis - I didn't really think anyone, Welsh, Scottish, or otherwise actually ATE the bloody things ;D - more ceremonial than anything. Not that there's anything wrong with them; just not your normal bill of fare. Heck, if people knew what went into chorizo, its' popularity may decline too. On the other hand, we do eat hot dogs.... ::)

I known an English, (at least 200 Pound) lady who is really fund of it!! ? The French have something similar ?"Des tripes" ( I ate them, visiting people in France, not exactly my favorite food) ?Chorizo is much much better than tripes.
My Scottish guest says she doesn't eat it, I am getting second toughts about her nationality, she didn't knew about the Wells kilt neither.
 

PancakeBill

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I have tried haggis. ?Love mussels, clams, oysters, and just about anything else out of the sea. ?Crawfish! mmm, lot of work, but delicious. ?

I tried the haggis up at the Highland Games, but was told by a Scot there that it was not authentic, but you know how the Scots are, if it ain't their Momma's Haggis it is just crap... ?;)

I thought it had a heavy clove taste, and was actually on the dry side., my Scot friend from Glasgow said it should have been a lot moister. ?He, BTW, eats haggis, but a vegetarian style. ?

Chourico (local spelling) is great!  Nice at breakfast instead of bacon or typical sausage, or on the grill, sliced and fried, as a meat entry in my clam chowder, adds spice and variety.  Good stuff!

Scrapple, now there is a different story.  Tried it too, OK, but not my favorite.
 

thenosyone

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Hi tom,

French fries...

We see English programs on tel, American movies, so we confuse sometimes where we pick up the words from.

I learn everyday. ?So its the Americans who denied us the propper respect for our favorite national dish... ?(joke)
Yes the French eat them, but not in the portions we do....
 

Tom

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BillnRI said:
Crawfish! mmm, lot of work, but delicious.

We have crawdads here in the CA delta. Kinda small and a lot of work.
 

Tom

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thenosyone said:
So its the Americans who denied us the propper respect for our favorite national dish

LOL yes, folks here in the USA use incorrect names for a lot of things.

Here's something that might be of interest on this subject.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Yes indeed, "French" fries are eaten in France. Oddly enough, they are called "Pommes Frites", which can be loosely translated as "English Fries".  I think Belgium, Holland and much of Europe offers similar fare, with many national variations in what is considered the "correct" method of preparing them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_fries#Origin_of_the_name
 
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