Leveling/Stabilizing Class C

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NewFLCamper

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I recently purchased a used Class C motorhome.  I really like the coach and understood when I purchased it that it did not have stabilizers.  However, after using it with my family, I thought it would be nice to be able to stablize it.  Unforturnately, the only option I have seen is to put in hydraulic stabilizers at a cost of over $2,500.

Are there any recommendations out there for how to do it cheaper.  My purchase was a 1996 Shasta for $18,000, so putting $2,500 into it is a big deal.

Thank you,

Mark
 

John From Detroit

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One thing I've seen done (and if memory serves this was a class A so it should work on a class C) is to use 4 trailer toung jacks, These are the kind that roatate down for parked and flat for travel, one on each corner, it worked

Of course when you park you carry an assortment of lumber, mostly 2x8" in assorted lengths so you can build a custom ramp to park on to make it as level as possible to start with
 

Phil

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NewFLCamper said:
I recently purchased a used Class C motorhome.  I really like the coach and understood when I purchased it that it did not have stabilizers.  However, after using it with my family, I thought it would be nice to be able to stablize it.  Unforturnately, the only option I have seen is to put in hydraulic stabilizers at a cost of over $2,500.

Are there any recommendations out there for how to do it cheaper.  My purchase was a 1996 Shasta for $18,000, so putting $2,500 into it is a big deal.
Mark,

I had 4 trailer type stabilizer jacks welded to a small class c that worked ok.  I used a cordless electric drill to screw the jacks up and down.  Cheap and dirty but worked ok for me.

Phil
 

Ned

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If all you need are stabilizers, these can be added for a lot less than $2500. ?BAL is the most common make that I've seen. ?You are pricing levelers (jacks) which do a lot more than the stabilizers. ?They have a hydraulic system and a controller that applies the jacks in pairs to avoid twisting the frame of the RV.
 

Pat

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I have a Class C and would love some way to level and stabilize it automatically.  I really envy the big rigs that come in where people hit a button someplace and the levelers do their job.  Attaching something that requires cranking, measuring, checking, leveling, and more cranking isn't much of a solution.  I don't understand why the Class Cs don't have the same levelers, since they have to be level as well.

I carry the plastic leveling blocks; although, I don't need them in my two major camping locations. 

--pat
 

Ned

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You can put leveling jacks on a type C.  HWH makes some models just for that application.  However, they are expensive.
 

Pat

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Ned:  I think I priced jacks once.  Also, I'm concerned about having enough real estate under my Class C to install more equipment.  I think if I had it done, I'd want the manufacturer of the RV to do it, and I believe they said they don't.

--pat
 

Ned

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If I were to add jacks to a class C, I think I would go to the HWH factory in Iowa and have them do the installation.
 

Terry A. Brewer

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Pat

>>I don't understand why the Class Cs don't have the same levelers, since they have to be level as well.<<

Some of the high end Class C's,? like the Chinooks,? offer them as standard equip. Coach house Platinum offers them as a option.


Terry
At Torrey, UT
 

BruceinFL

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There is a BigFoot outlet in Lakeland, 4411 Holden Road, at the airport. Phone number is 1-800-699-6680 or 863-619-8617. You can call and get an estimate. I know of a fifth wheel owner who had the QEII 4 Pt. System installed. Cost him over $3500 with installation and tax. Pretty pricey for covenience but might be worth it the first time you are try to setup in the middle of a gully washer.  ;)
 

Pat

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Terry:  Hmm.  Maybe I'll have to save my pennies and talk to Chinook.  I have their Destiny. 

For me levelers is a lot more than convenience.  It's really more a case of accuracy, comfort, and wear and tear on things  that have to be level.  I'm very picky about getting my tires fully supported by the plastic blocks I use, and I have to do a lot of experimenting to get it right.  Also, the blocks can be only 2 or 3 layers high, so I am limited in the sites I can use.  It's much worse when one side is level, and I'm using blocks under the right front and dual right rear tires, for example.  I don't even have that many blocks.  I've been in situations on dirt where rain caused the blocks to shift.  Maybe I worry to much about getting it just right.  Fortunately my main summer and winter homes are paved.  I was in a different spot this winter, and the site was perfectly level for the front-heavy Chinook.

--pat
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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...but I think that you could get a decent system installed for a lot less.

It depends on the definition of "decent", but I doubt if it could be much less except as a DIY job.  We are talking about 4 large hydraulic jacks with mounting brackets, a reservoir and pump, a fairly complex hydraulic controller,  a lot of high pressure hydraulic lines and an operator panel inside the RV.  Got to be over $2000 in parts at retail prices and the installation labor is going to be 10-16 hours in an experienced shop. Figure another $1000-1500 for that, depending on local labor rates.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Also, the blocks can be only 2 or 3 layers high, so I am limited in the sites I can use.  It's much worse when one side is level, and I'm using blocks under the right front and dual right rear tires, for example.  I don't even have that many blocks.  I've been in situations on dirt where rain caused the blocks to shift.


Hydraulic jacks may not be the panacea you expect, Pat.  They may not llift a rig much more than 3 layers of blocks (3-5 inches?). The length of travel of the hydraulic arms is mostly used to reach the ground and besides, you don't want to lift the tires of the ground (especially the rears!).  And the ground sometimes settles or washes out under hydraulic jacks too.

We like to camp in forest places that often have uneven sites and we still carry 6 2x10 wood blocks for leveling, despite a good set of Power Gear jacks. We use the wood under the tires to get somewhat near level and them finish off with the jacks. Often have to put wood blocks under the jack pads to, because they may no longer reach the ground once I drive up on the blocks.
 

Pat

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It's encouraging to know that leveling isn't really so simple for anyone.  Plus, I guess with hydraulics, there's something else to go wrong, and LOTS of people have problems with their jacks.  I'll stick to my yellow and orange blocks for the moment.  Anyway, $3500 for the jacks isn't an option.

--pat
 

Terry A. Brewer

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Pat

>>It's encouraging to know that leveling isn't really so simple for anyone. <<

It is very simple in my case as my coach uses air leveling & in over 9 years with two different coach's I have only been unable to level twice. Of course as my coach is 40' & 37000 lbs? so I don't utilize forest campgrounds...however I do dry camp & boondock extensively in the West.

Terry
On the way to Bryce Canyon
 

Karl

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Gary,

You may very well be correct (I may be living in a dream world), but wouldn't someone have a system for Class C's? Can't imagine they would have to be nearly the same capacity as those on a 35-40' Class A, and may be less expensive.

We like to camp in forest places that often have uneven sites and we still carry 6 2x10 wood blocks for leveling, despite a good set of Power Gear jacks. We use the wood under the tires to get somewhat near level and them finish off with the jacks. Often have to put wood blocks under the jack pads to, because they may no longer reach the ground once I drive up on the blocks.

Good points, and you also have to remember to use them under both wheels on dual-wheeled axles; not just the outer or inner wheels - puts too much strain on the axle.
 

Karl

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Found this site: http://www.quadraleveler.com/product.html

They make hydraulic levelers for various classes of MH's and each 'leg' has it's own pump/reservoir. Have no idea what the cost is, but installation should be easier without having to route hyd. lines; just electrical. OTOH, duplicating the pump, etc. on each leg may well offset any installation cost savings, and having 4 of anything means 4 times as many things to go wrong. What's a mother to do??? ;D
 

Carl L

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NewFLCamper said:
I recently purchased a used Class C motorhome.? I really like the coach and understood when I purchased it that it did not have stabilizers.? However, after using it with my family, I thought it would be nice to be able to stablize it.? Unforturnately, the only option I have seen is to put in hydraulic stabilizers at a cost of over $2,500.

Are there any recommendations out there for how to do it cheaper.? My purchase was a 1996 Shasta for $18,000, so putting $2,500 into it is a big deal.

No lie and yes you can do it cheaper, if all you want to do is stabilize.? ?The cheapest and simplest way is stacker jacks.?? CLICK HERE ? to see a set sold by Camping world.? ?

You set the jacks under a frame member at each corner of the motor home.? ?They are simple to use cheap enough to try and see if they work.  They clear 11"and extend to 17".  The height can be added to by blocking.  They are simple to use and cheap enough to try and see if they work.  What is the worst that can happen?  You are out $18. 8)
 
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