leveling

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swampsauce

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Dec 15, 2005
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27
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rockingham, nc
my '86 gulf stream has stabilizing jacks, but not leveling jacks. when several inches of leveling is needed, usually front to back, what is the best wayto doit. ive used 2x8's to gain 3" to 4 1/2" by putting them behind the wheel and backing up.do i need a hydrolic jack under axle and just jack up? any help would be wonderful. thanks in advance.
 

Ron

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Jan 29, 2005
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Home is where we park it
The 88 Bounder we had didn't have leveling jacks.  To lever we used blocks of wood at first then we discovered the plastic blocks that connect together similar to leggos.  When blocking the duals be sure to put blocks under both tires.

 

Karl

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Mar 3, 2005
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Elkhart Lake, WI for the summer. Work at Road Amer
If you do use a jack, make sure you only use it at the specified jack points. Otherwise, you run the risk of bending the frame. Even those of us with hydraulic jacks need to follow the correct procedure to prevent this from happening. Driving onto the levelling blocks is safer for both the Gulf Stream - and you!
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
Driving onto wood blocks is the easiest and most cost effective way and its the tried & true method used by tens of thousands of RVers for many, many years.  If you need to get higher than about 3-4 inches, you will need a series of boards so you can climb them like stair steps rather than all at once. A longer board, maybe two feet long than the tire footprint, will let you step up a couple inches and the additional board(s) can be placed on top of that, further back.  The board the tire actually sits on need be only large enough for the contact area of the tire, typically no more than 12-16 inches long and 7-8 inches wide.

When using boards, make sure the tire rests fully on the board and does not hang over on the edge or end. The tire is designed to roll over raised edges  but not to sit on one for extended periods.
 

Jim Dick

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Feb 11, 2005
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Titusville, FL
Hi Swampsauce,

I would not recommend jacking the axle. If you have to level more than 4 1/2" I would start looking for another site. You would need two jacks minimum to jack the axle, one on each end, and it isn't the safest thing to do. You're much better off with wood blocks.
 

John From Detroit

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Apr 12, 2005
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Davison Michigan
swampsauce said:
thanks to all, sounds like i need more blocks. thanks again

I can tell you there are a few different ways of getting leveling blocks

Most RV stores sell very expensive plastic leveling systems, some are kind of like Leggo blocks (you build up as high as you need) some are designed differently, all are expensive

You can buy a 2xN (n=width of tire) and cut it into lengths, 3', 2' 1' cut on an angle please just for fun.

You might try the same lumber yard,, See if they have any scrap lengths of 2x whatever,  Sometimes the price is very,very, very right
 

Carl L

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Mar 14, 2005
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west Los Angeles
Most RV stores sell very expensive plastic leveling systems, some are kind of like Leggo blocks (you build up as high as you need) some are designed differently, all are expensive

$33 for a sack of 10 leveling blocks at Camping World.    I have two sacks of the rascals -- 20 blocks.  That is sufficent to raise a pair of tandem axle tires 3 inches, all I need.  The blocks have a few advantages over wood blocks:    They are lighter and compact in storage.  They are impervious to water and will not warp.  They interlock.  And frankly, out in our metropolitan neck of the woods (LA), 2x12 wood is not much cheaper. 


 
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