Need some help and some answers

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banjoguywv

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Apr 12, 2006
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My first question is this, I just bought a F-150 (05) with 9000 miles on it and love it. Extended cab 4x4. The bumper list the maxium towing capacity as 9900lbs the ads for the of F-150 say the same yet on the net and the ford towing guide I found it says 6100lbs max,  so im confused? ..Anyway the TT we want is an ultrlight by Rockwood that is 31 feet long and weighs 5847lbs dry weight or another model that wighs only 124lbs more (5971lbs)

The 2005 book I got with the truck says 6500lbs trailer weight max, whats up?, Thanks in advance.

Here are numbers off my truck. Inside the drivers door it says GVWR is 6950lbs.
On the bumber it says

                WEIGHT CARRYING
 
    Max trailer weight  5000lbs          Max tounge weight  500lbs

 
              WIEGHT DISTRIBUTING

    Max trailer weight  9900lbs            Max tounge weight  990lbs
 

Carl L

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Fine, but what engine does your truck have?  The 5.4, 4.6 or the 4.2?  Is the "Super Cab" or "Super Crew"?
 

banjoguywv

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Apr 12, 2006
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Its the 4.6L V8 and I dont know the difference between Super crew and the Super CAb but it has 4 doors but not like a car, you have to open the front doors to get open the back, hope that helps.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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You have the Supercab model if it doesn't have regular rear doors.

The numbers stamped on the bumper are probably a rating strictly for the step bumper and may exceed the rating for the rest of the vehicle.  You can install a 10,000 lb hitch on a bicycle but that doesn't make the bicycle capable of safelly towing 10,000 lbs.

According to the Ford towing guide, a Supercab 4x4 is rated for 6100 lbs with the 3.55 axle and 6600 lbs with the 3.73, so you need to find out which one you have. Might be listed in the glove box or might be identifiable via a tag on the reardifferential. Or a dealer can check it for you in the Ford vehicle database using the VIN.

I think both of those trailers are much too heavy for your truck. Think a bit smaller or one of the "lite" trailer types. 
 

banjoguywv

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Apr 12, 2006
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These are ultralight models, they claim that there made to be towed by vans and light duty trucks?.
 

Karl

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Both Gary and Carl are pretty knowledgeable when it comes to towing capacities, and I would tend to believe them more than any brochure or salesman.

Gary, I know you were being perfectly serious about putting a 10,000 lb. hitch on a bicycle, but I just about choked on my coffee when I read that! Next time, give a guy fair warning. :D
 

banjoguywv

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Apr 12, 2006
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They have the same model in a 29ft that weighs 4978lb dry weight, would that be more to what we would need as far as weight?
 

Carl L

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banjoguywv said:
These are ultralight models, they claim that there made to be towed by vans and light duty trucks?.

But did the turkeys say which vans and light duty trucks.

They have the same model in a 29ft that weighs 4978lb dry weight, would that be more to what we would need as far as weight?

Dry weight!  Ok does that dry weight include airconditioner, awning,  two propane tanks, and batteries (you will need two)?  Find that out first.  Then add water (320 lbs for 40 gallons) and  propane (about 50 lbs).  Then add about 500 lbs for gear.

I have a Ford Bronco, which is a bobtailed F-150 with a 5.0L V8 that has a tow rating of 6600 lbs.  My Prowler 23LV travel trailer weighs in at 4650 lbs as scaled at a certified scale.  It carries an A/C, an awning, 2 propane tanks and 2 batteries.  It was not carrying water or much gear.  It pulls nicely but to tell you the truth I would not put a heavier unit behind it.  I tow on in the mountain and Pacific west.  Because of our aititudes (upwards of 8000') and long long 6%  grades even on interstates, I subtracted 15% from my trucks tow rating of 6600 libs.  That gave me a maximum trailer laden weight of 5610#.  That was  more than the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating  (GVWR) of the Prowler -- so I bought it.

Now if you never plan to tow in the Wild West, then you need only to subtract about 5-10% from your trucks tow rating.  For a good rule of thumb, compare this with the GVWR of your prospective tow.  If the GVWR is less than the corrected tow rating, then you are in business, if not then you need to move down in trailer weight.

 

Gary RV_Wizard

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An F350 Superduty with dual wheels is still considered a "light duty truck" by the vehicle industry, so they haven't made any great concessions by saying that.  Your F150 is just about the lightest of the light duties, save only the Rangers and such.

It's best to assume that any trailer you tow will weigh close to its GVWR when actually in use. And dry weight is often understated, since it often does not include all factory options which may be installed and never includes any dealer installed options. 

Also, your truck's rated towing capacity has to be reduced by the weight of anything you carry in the truck, e.g. your wife & dog, the trailer hitch, etc.  And its usually based on a 150 lb driver in th etruck. Don't know about you, but I haven't weighed 150 since high school.

Bottom line is that you need to allow for some extra head room. The 4900 lb trailer would put you in much safer territory.
 
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