New to Class A World

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

WagginMaster

New member
Joined
Nov 8, 2012
Posts
4
Location
Milton, WV
I am new to the Class A world. Recently traded our fifth wheel for a 2004 Winnebago Adventurer. So I have a few newbie questions?
1. Since I am parked for an extended period and connected to full hookups, how often should I state the motor home engine and generator?
2. I am parked on grass. Should I have plywood pads under tires and/or jacks?
3. If I use something like Aerospace 303 on the tires, do I need to cover the tires also?

Any other suggestions or recommendations you can provide to a first time Class A owner would be appreciated. 
 

Ned

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Posts
25,107
Location
USA
1. Don't start the motorhome engine unless you can drive it and get it to operating temperatures.  Otherwise, leave it alone.
2. Jack pads will be needed if the ground gets wet to keep them from sinking.  Not so much for the tires.
3. Most (all?) tire manufacturers say to not use anything on the tires other than clean them with soap and water.  Covering is your choice, but I don't believe it's necessary.  Others will disagree :)
 
B

bucks2

Guest
Opinions will vary on these topics. Here are mine:

If parked for extended periods, run the generator under load, AC in summer/heat pump in winter (or electric heat as appropriate for your rig) for at least 1 hour per month. Start the generator and let it warm/cool the rig while you check the engine oil, kick the tires, dust the cobwebs or whatever. Take the MH for a drive once a month for a 30 minute drive. This will fully warm up the engine, transmission, roll the tires, wheel bearings, and shake up the mice. IF, for some reason driving for 30 minutes is impossible due to weather etc. I would NOT start the MH engine. I'd simply let it sleep. If it can't be fully warmed by driving, don't start it at all.

If you're parked on grass put something under the tires. Pieces of plywood are great. Something to stop the inevitable sinking and the dirt contact. If you can find them on a great sale, plastic cutting boards are good too. Depending on your circumstances, they may even be cheaper than buying a sheet of plywood, saw horses and a skillsaw to make plywood pads.  ;D

Now the best part, here the opinions will vary widely and gain religious fervor. Whether you need to cover your tires or not all depends. If I was in the south where the sun was shining everyday and was parked for months without moving, I'd probably cover them. But, if I was parked in WA state where it rains steadily for months on end, and is cloudy and overcast when it's not raining, (yes I lived there full time for 53 years) then I wouldn't bother. I'd spray liberally with 303 and just recoat as needed. I'd be careful to spray everywhere I could, between tires, backsides etc.

The other item that I'd mention is to use everything as often as possible. Even if you can't go somewhere, turn on the heater, water heater, lights, tv antenna, water pump, close out cover etc. Things that don't get used tend to stop working more than things that get regular use. Even if it's only once a month, try to exercise everything. Also, if you find something that doesn't work when you're just there checking, it gives you time to get it fixed before you need it.

Ken
 

Ned

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Posts
25,107
Location
USA
Sorry, I didn't address the generator question.  Do as Ken recommends, run it once a month under load long enough to get it to operating temperature.  An hour is sufficient.
 

dan2

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 6, 2012
Posts
193
I crank my engine over for a few seconds:eek:nce a month, during winter months 8)
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,322
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
I see from your blog that you have a Winnie Adventurer. For extended camping with that model of coach, you need to do something to re-charge the chassis batteries because the standard Winnebago system on the Adventurer does not trickle charge the chassis battery while hooked to shore power. The easiest solution is to add a device called a Trik-L-Start. Many Winnie owners have done this.

How long a time period are we talking about? "Extended" could be anywhere from a few weeks to many months.
 

Mgreenway

New member
Joined
Nov 19, 2012
Posts
1
Hello, my wife and I are going to spend $70,000 on a coach or a bus. We have looked at a 95 42 foot Bluebird and a 2000 36 foot Country Coach Magna. The Country Coach has one slide and 325 hp. The Bluebird has a 500 hp.  They are the same price. Which one would be the best buy for us? This will be our first RV. I would also like to know which coaches are considered the top of the line.

Thanks a lot.
Mark and Suzan in North Texas
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,322
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
The better coach is the one that suits your wants and needs the best. You didn't say anything about floor plan, amenities, or the things that are important to YOU. Nor did you mention the working condition of appliances & systems, or the appearance inside and out.

Bluebird (Wanderlodge) makes a superbly built coach, but the Country Coach is no slouch either. I would have to rate the quality of either one as excellent. You will spend a lot more time living in it than driving it, so engine size is not all that important. Instead, focus on the layout, storage, convenience, and the condition of appliances and systems.
 

garyb1st

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Posts
3,954
Location
Southern California
I recall reading that tires that are used periodically last longer than those that sit for extended periods of time.  Not sure what constitutes an extended period of time.  However, if true it might be beneficial to take the motorhome out periodically for a half hour or so every so often.  Considering the cost of new tires, the added fuel costs might be a reasonable tradeoff.   
 
Top Bottom