New Universal Disconnect?

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Mater

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Posts
7
Hey guys/girls.

I'm new to your forum as you can see. I'm doing some research regarding drive shaft disco's. I know that the Remco is available and it's super pricey and problematic in some applications. But, would you be interested in something better?

The reason I ask is because I've designed an electric disconnect that can replace any drive shaft or adapt to ANY drive shaft easily and not too expensively. Any vehicle with a drive shaft could be towed without worrying about damaging it. Without a huge price tag or down time. The best part is it?s ease of use.

The first prototype has been built to prove the concept. Everything is looking good and it works well. To disengage you simply press an in cab mounted button (on dash or elsewhere). It takes about 3 seconds for the unit to disengage, and the same operation works to reengage it. All the parts are sealed, no worries of it getting gummed up with dirt/dust/ice/mud etc. No chance of the unit going out of adjustment. There is NO adjustment ever needed as it's ready to operate as soon as it's installed. There are no parts that wear out either.

Installation would be just as easy as replacing the drive shaft. You'll also have to run two wires back to the brush housing (the part of the unit that transfers the power), and install the switch. After it's installed you'll never have to touch or look at it again.

I do not manufacture or sell these at this time. Consider this market research. I'm not trying to sell anything here, just wondering if it WOULD sell. I'm just a person with a provisional patent and I want to know if I should pursue this any further.

I have pics and a video of it operating if anyone is interested.

Any questions or comments? What are your thoughts?

Thanks for your time!
Mater
 
Sounds good, just wondering if it has to maintain power on the engage or disengage. If so ther could be a problem if power was lost. Do you have a provision to override in case of malfunction??
 
Mater said:
I've designed an electric disconnect that can replace any drive shaft or adapt to ANY drive shaft easily and not too expensively. Any vehicle with a drive shaft could be towed without worrying about damaging it. Without a huge price tag or down time. The best part is it?s ease of use.


I have pics and a video of it operating if anyone is interested.

I tow a 1976 Austin Mini FRONT WHEEL DRIVE does your unit work for BOTH drive shafts for my car? I think you need to re-word cause to me it sounds like you are only talking about REAR WHEEL DRIVE vehicle's.

We do love to see pics and video's feel free to post em up :)
 
 
catblaster said:
Sounds good, just wondering if it has to maintain power on the engage or disengage. If so ther could be a problem if power was lost. Do you have a provision to override in case of malfunction??

The power is only applied during the engage/disengage for approximately 3 seconds. No worries there.
 
I guess I don't see much difference between the manual disconnect (ala Remco DSC) and an electric one. The disconnect unit has to function essentially the same, so you are substituting an electric solenoid for a manual push/pull mechanism. You imply that would be less expensive than Remco DSC product, but that seems doubtful to me.

However, this is the USA and we love our powered gadgets. I know a lot of people who will always choose an electronic tool/gadget over a manual one. You may be on to something in terms of what people would like to have, but the overall market is still pretty small.
 
1275gtsport said:
I tow a 1976 Austin Mini FRONT WHEEL DRIVE does your unit work for BOTH drive shafts for my car? I think you need to re-word cause to me it sounds like you are only talking about REAR WHEEL DRIVE vehicle's.

We do love to see pics and video's feel free to post em up :)

Well technically, if the actual shaft section of both of the CV's (between the joints) is at least 14" long this system will adapt to the shafts. I say "technically" because those shafts are pretty light duty and this unit would be somewhat bulky on them. Another thing is, a diameter of 5" is needed to clear at the widest part of the unit. The mating flanges are about 5". So clearance could be an issue in a compact car like that. This disconnect is more for rear wheel drive/4WD vehicles but it would likely work for some FWD cars.

I only have an mp4. video of the unit working, I'll try to attach it. It looks like mp4. is not an "allowed file type". If it doesn't work I'll just set up a link to it through photobucket or something.

Thanks for your input guys. Its very appreciated.

Mater

EDIT: The file is too big. I'll provide a link soon.


 
Gary RV Roamer said:
I guess I don't see much difference between the manual disconnect (ala Remco DSC) and an electric one. The disconnect unit has to function essentially the same, so you are substituting an electric solenoid for a manual push/pull mechanism. You imply that would be less expensive than Remco DSC product, but that seems doubtful to me.

However, this is the USA and we love our powered gadgets. I know a lot of people who will always choose an electronic tool/gadget over a manual one. You may be on to something in terms of what people would like to have, but the overall market is still pretty small.

The differences are quite apparent when you go to install my disconnect. I've read horror stories of people trying to install the Remco unit themselves. The cost of the unit and the amount you may pay to have it professionally installed would be much more when compared to just bolting a self contained drive shaft/disconnect up. Anyone can do it. There's no need to find a location to install a lever in cab. No adjusting the cable. No messing with U-bolts and brackets. Never any need to crawl under the vehicle to spray it with lube (which also attracts dust/dirt) if it jams up or isn't smoothly engaging. The Remco design is at the lowest part of the drive shaft and is prone to damage by road debris. My unit installs at the transmission end, higher and more protected. The Remco is prone to vibration due to its mechanism and design, the electric disco does not have that annoying problem.

You bring up a valid point regarding market size. This unit was initially built with the off road crowd in mind. There are expensive and very few transfer cases that allow only front wheel drive operation for the purpose of maneuverability. It's called a "front dig" and when employed it enables tight turns around obstacles by dragging the rear brakes, cranking the front wheels left/right and gassing it. It's utilized in competitions a lot (cone dodging etc.). Offroading is one of the fastest growing hobbies/sports in North America. So between both the off road market and the toad market I think the Disco Shaft could turn a profit...I hope  :-\ 
 
Slick, I assume you are using a linear actuator.  I think I see a problem if used, i.e., drive shaft disconnected, in freezing rain, snow or mud.  Not sure about sand either.  These materials could get between the disks and possibly jamb the discs so they could not come together.  I assume they must for the disco to work.

Just a thought.
 
Jim Godward said:
Slick, but I think I see a problem if used, i.e., drive shaft disconnected, in freezing rain, snow or mud.  These materials could get between the disks and possibly jamb the discs so they could not come together.  I assume they must for the disco to work.

Just a thought.

It's unlikely that the rear of the transmission would see that much debris being up high and protected as it is. The chance of it getting between the flanges is very unlikely. I  don't foresee that being an issue. It would be a very rare occasion.

Thanks for your input.
 
Mater,

I don't know where you live but I can assure you that there was lots of snow and ice under my Jeep GC last year after 150 miles on slushy roads in MT.  The ATVs come home and they are covered with mud as are the drivers.

I think some field trials should be tried and hopefully you will be right.  The next couple of days here would be good as there is about 6" of snow and temps will be above freezing for few days.  Lots of slush and ice.  My garage will be a mess!

Possibly a boot over the Disco may be a good idea.  :)
 
Jim Godward said:
Mater,

I don't know where you live but I can assure you that there was lots of snow and ice under my Jeep GC last year after 150 miles on slushy roads in MT.  The ATVs come home and they are covered with mud as are the drivers.

I think some field trials should be tried and hopefully you will be right.  The next couple of days here would be good as there is about 6" of snow and temps will be above freezing for few days.  Lots of slush and ice.  My garage will be a mess!

Possibly a boot over the Disco may be a good idea.  :)

I actually live in Canada and I see my fair share of snow, slush and muck just in general. The area that the Disco is located is typically not splashed on by wheels or collect that kind of stuff. If it does become an issue there have been a couple ideas to integrate a shroud to one of the flanges that overlaps the other. 
 
1.  I see that there is only one engaging pin, though I see a hole directly opposite which I assume is for a second pin.  Have you tested whether these can handle the torque that may be applied to them?  Since you mention one of the markets is for off-roaders and having some time doing that in a Jeep Wrangler that I built up in the late '90s, I was curious.  Stick 33-35 inch tires on something and start doing some serious mudding or rock crawling, and I've completely shattered a U-Joint.  I've seen others do much worse.

2.  I notice when you re-engage the shaft that you had to turn the yoke by hand to get the pin to align.  How would alignment be handled after install?  Under power? 

Best of luck. 

Randy
 
Interesting.
When I had a 1992 Lumina APV I had enough clearane to reach behind the front wheel and operate the Remoco axle lock  (Front wheel drive) on my 2001 Lumina not so much room so I use a lube pump

I would MUCH more like something like this

Let me know what happens.
 
TomnDine said:
Mater

If you are still active please get back to me.  I may be interested in partnering in your idea

Mater hasn't returned since his last post in this topic, January 17, 2013.
 

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