pressurize or anti-freeze, that is the question

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

VERNON

Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2012
Posts
7
happy pre thanksgiving to all you RV'ers, quick question, we have a weekend retreat travel trailer on the out skirts of Ocala Fl. and this is our first winter and i am woundering which to do, blow the  water lines out or do the anti-freeze or both, i always learn something from you guys and will appreciate your imput. thanks vernon ,     
 

RoyM

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 11, 2009
Posts
1,972
I bought a valve that plumbs into the pump inlet without tools, installation and pumping the anti freeze through the system took all of 20 minutes. A lot easier than standing in the rain fiddling with the compressor and hose. I did close off the water heater and open the bypass, don't want anti freeze in there when I fire it next spring.
 

Karsty

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 14, 2011
Posts
239
Location
Niagara Falls, Ontario
I am not the expert in this matter, however I have seen some folks advocate one way or the other, while other suggest doing both. It will totally depend on who you talk to.

As I recall, Ocala is north-west of Orlando and I gather that it could go below freezing on occasion. But really ? you?re not expecting temperatures to be in the minuses like the northern states or Canada.

I would just suggest that you go with one ? whatever is easier for you and go with it. If you are planning to use it throughout the winter, during your weekends, I really don?t know what to tell you.

Maybe some of the permeant residence in the area have some other ideas ? or maybe some of the snowbirds that head to Florida to get away from the cold winter weather in the north can chime in.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,320
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
We live east of Ocala (out in the National Forest) and use the blow out (air pressure) method if freezing weather threatens (and it usually does, at east a couple times each winter). I like it because I don't have to flush the lines later when ready to travel again.  But it's not a big deal either way - do whichever seems best or easiest to you.
 

COMer

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 25, 2009
Posts
1,663
Both good methods with many fans.  I prefer the antifreeze because I absolutely know when the line is protected.  When I see pink coming from a faucet, it is done.  Don't forget to do the commode and don't forget to throw some antifreeze down in the traps.  If you have an outside shower that needs done too.
 

Mopar1973Man

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2011
Posts
3,485
Location
New Meadows, Idaho
Gary RV Roamer said:
We live east of Ocala (out in the National Forest) and use the blow out (air pressure) method if freezing weather threatens (and it usually does, at east a couple times each winter). I like it because I don't have to flush the lines later when ready to travel again.  But it's not a big deal either way - do whichever seems best or easiest to you.

I'm also the same as Gary I blow the lines out too... Hard to freeze water or liquid if its not there. Must easier to setup too.
 

Jim Dick

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Posts
7,651
Location
Titusville, FL
If you use the blow out method, be sure most of the water has been removed. If there is enough left to gather at a low point in the system, it might cause a freeze and rupture of that line.

Done properly, most units can be winterized with about 2-3 gallons of antifreeze. Clearing it out is easy as it only requires running water through the lines until all the pink is gone. Using a winterizing valve on the water pump is the easiest way to go.
 

winnie32v

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Posts
182
My method...in Pennsylvania where it can get very cold.

My lines are almost empty because I opened all of the valves and let all of the lines drain out of the low lever drain pipe during my last trip.  Natural movement of the unit seems to eliminate all of the water from even the lowest lines.

I close the water tank valve, pump RV antifreeze through all of the spigots (kitchen, bath vanity & shower), toilet valve and outside shower.  Don't forget to keep some in the toilet bowl.
Adding antifreeze to the black & gray tanks is advised if you think that you may have some residual fluid there.

Also, be sure to release pressure on the external water supply valve until pink comes out of that.
I then pour about 1 pint of antifreeze into each trap...don't forget the shower.

Once everything has been winterized, I open all spigots and place a small bucket under the low level drain valve.
I open this valve and drain out all of the antifreeze that can drain, by gravity.
I collect about 1 1/2 gal and keep this for future use in traps, etc.
Removing this antifreeze makes the first fill up easier and quicker.  Less water in the gray tank.

Last, I remove the water tank drain plug and use a small plastic hose to remove remaining water from the tank via siphon.  I was surprised to get about a quart out. What little is left in the tank will not create a problem if it freezes.  Plug is installed for the next tank fill up.
 

ruthandken CDN

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 7, 2007
Posts
831
Location
Ontario, Canada
I do both, but then I live in Canada, and you can be sure some nasty cold weather will come our way before we head south.  I have a washer/dryer combo so have to make sure it gets into those lines too.  It's not a difficult thing to do.
 

Carmine

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2012
Posts
14
i have a question about the antifreeze method, does the water filter cartridge fill up with  antifreeze while you are pumping antifreeze to all your faucets?
 

cpaulsen

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2010
Posts
210
Location
Oregon
I just blow-out the lines.We get temps down in the low teens and sometimes even lower. Then use antifreeze to make sure the traps are full. Takes about minutes.
 

captsteve

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 29, 2011
Posts
2,431
Location
crestview, fl
Carmine said:
i have a question about the antifreeze method, does the water filter cartridge fill up with  antifreeze while you are pumping antifreeze to all your faucets?

Yes it would, you should have a bypass hose that you can install in it's place before you winterize.

Steve
 

Karsty

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 14, 2011
Posts
239
Location
Niagara Falls, Ontario
Carmine said:
i have a question about the antifreeze method, does the water filter cartridge fill up with  antifreeze while you are pumping antifreeze to all your faucets?

I removed the water filter cartridge and replaced it with a plastic diverter plug. (See picture below). The blue arrow is pointing to the diverter plug.
 

Attachments

  • Atwood HW Heater-b.jpg
    Atwood HW Heater-b.jpg
    100.8 KB · Views: 36

COcamper

New member
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Posts
2
I do both. I blow the lines with a blow out plug. As long as you have opened all the water connections and low point drains, this would be fine for most people. Then have the water pump suck up a little antifreeze. If the seals in the water pump are left dry, over time you can get small cracks that reduce the life of a water pump.

Just my humble opinion. By the way, I own 24 campers and travel trailers.

Lon

Edit: Removed commercial ad.

 

Virgie & Fred

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Posts
69
Location
Dallas , Texas
Speaking of pumps and water stuff; does anyone know where the water pump is located on a 2003 Class C Coachman Freedom 26 ' Chevy frame. I hear it running somewhere near the sink but I can't seem to find the access panel for it. I don't need to replace it yet, just wondered how to get at it?  :-\
 

denmarc

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Posts
2,502
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
It really has to do with whatever method you are most comfortable with and where the RV is parked for the Winter.  Up here in the north, the Winters can be below freezing for weeks on end.  I take no chances.  I drain everything as much as possible and pump the pink stuff through.  I got it down to a science.  Depending on how long it takes to drain the fresh water tank, I usually can have it all done inside of an hour and the only cost is 2 gallons of the pink stuff bought on sale during the off season.  Water heater is drained and put in by-pass mode.  After that, pink stuff on it's way through the system.  I prefer to have the fresh water pump wet throughout the Winter for the sake of the internal seals.  I have this down to a science.  I will have enough over for all the traps, the toilet to keep the flapper seal wet, and I save myself about 1 cup at the end to pour into the fresh tank to protect the plastic 90 degree fitting at the bottom of the tank.  Had to replace that little bugger once before due to freezing.  Not fun!

The whole idea is to protect the integrity of the water system during below freezing temperatures.  For extended periods of time if in the north.  Do whatever works for you and your situation.  The goal is to make sure any standing water in the system is either gone, or has room to expand without damage.
 
Top Bottom