Question on dually tires temp

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RVRAC

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Hi folks, I drove 200 miles today in a hot-humid day.  Temps were 85-95.  I noticed that the temp of the dually tires on the passenger side were running 10-20 degrees hotter than in the driver's side.  The passenger side is where the fridge and combo washer/dryer are located.  The temp on the passenger side were 124-135,  The ones on the driver's side were 110-120.  Is this ok? Or should I be concerned? This is my first MH, there is a lot I don't know.
 

Larry N.

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That should be fine. Usually the side with the sun will be a bit hotter than the more shady side, but other factors (strong crosswinds, etc.) can have some effect, as well. So when I see both sides close, I'm surprised.
 

AStravelers

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San Antonio, TX
What are the tire pressures?  Have you weighed the rig to see if your tires are overloaded on that side?  I am much more concerned about the tire pressure than the temp of the sensor. 

Assuming the sensor you are using is mounted on the valve stem, you are really measuring the outside air temperature more so than the actual temp of the air inside the tire.  Granted the heat from the tire will affect the temp of the sensor some, but all the air blowing by affects it more.

Or is it just a simple matter that the sun was shinning on that side?

Also the inside dually tire is usually a 2-4 pounds higher in pressure (and hotter), when traveling, than the outside tire.  Less air circulation and more heat from the engine and exhaust if a front engine RV.
 

RVRAC

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Al, I don?t have access to weight each side.  Last time i weight the unit a couple weeks ago, the rear le was 580pounds under.  The tire pressure is what called for at the door sticker.  I?m using an infrared gun to check temp.
 

youracman

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Denver, CO
RVRAC said:
Hi folks, I drove 200 miles today in a hot-humid day.  Temps were 85-95.  I noticed that the temp of the dually tires on the passenger side were running 10-20 degrees hotter than in the driver's side.  The passenger side is where the fridge and combo washer/dryer are located.  The temp on the passenger side were 124-135,  The ones on the driver's side were 110-120.  Is this ok? Or should I be concerned? This is my first MH, there is a lot I don't know.

My TPMS system has the hi temp default warning set at 158* F and they recommend you don't change it; they say that "is the Michelin standard".  Also, quoting the user's manual:  "........ tires typically fail between 180-200* Farenheit".  Hope that data helps you "fill in a blank data point".

FWIW: My passenger side (inside) dual is the hottest running tire on my rig....... often at 135* or so.  A truck tire shop mgr told me that inside duals always run hotter and he said it is generally thought  to be due to poor air circulation in that position.  Each of the 3 owners of my rig has had one blowout ..... each time an inside dual.  In my case it was on the driver's side and the TPMS gave no warning of overpressure, underpressure or overtemp and the tire (Goodrich) was just a few months over 5 yrs old.  Happened on the way home from CA after purchase; so I bought a set of 6 Bridgestones in Las Vegas.  I have since put over 15K miles on the rig (about 3K miles in the desert SW ..... at 115* part of the time) without tire trouble of any kind.  Still,  those Bridgestones will never see a 5th birthday on my rig.  (I belong to the "tires is cheaper'n bones" club)    :D

Pretty common knowledge that just about all 30+ ft Class C's are loaded to the hilt, so to speak.  I got CAT scale weights for mine early on (loaded as I usually travel) and, like you, I am well under my GVWR and my GAWR's too (need to get "4-corner" weights someday)..... carrying heavy/dense stuff in the toad helps keep the MH weights in check.  I believe the 16" tires are the weakest link in the chassis on my coach.  Much as I enjoy my rig,  the big ol' wheels and tires the Class A's have are a real advantage IMHO.

Safe travels ................... ed s
 

SargeW

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Where ever we park it!
My inside duals are always a bit hotter than the outside tires, but on a pusher the motor is closer to the inside tires. And then the passenger side is a little hotter still since that is where the that huge DPF and muffler are.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Feb 2, 2005
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At my Silver Springs FL home
The real point here is that there is no particular temperature point that is sacrosanct.  Even the 158 degree TPMS default preset.  Use the TPMS temperature readings as a day-by-day comparison and watch for dramatic changes from the usual readings.  That's when you want to pay more attention.
 

John From Detroit

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Apr 12, 2005
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Davison Michigan
THere are several things that affect Tire Temp when driving.

One is .. Are you headed east. or West.. Or if headed north or shout is it AM or PM (Solar time, not watch time)...

Short story.... ONE TIME.  Just ONE TIME.  My ONAN generator shut down due to overheat (I can't blame it) and the GEN-TURI stack was so hot I had to use gloves to take it down and bag it.  Never before. or since, have I needed gloves on the black part (DO NOT TOUCH THE METAL PARTS)  So what made it so hot??? Sunlight, that's what. (It is also what overheated the generator. RV is a dark color not my first choice but I was married then).

Another time I had a 30 amp cord.. Lying oh about 70 feet or so most out in the sun. Draw on teh cord before we shut down was about 10 amps peak.. PEAK. Cord was so hot I had to use gloves.. Till I got to the part that was in the shade.. It was COLD to the touch.

Likewise the sun side tires are going to be hotter.


Another thing is your load distribution.. Tire inflation depends on how much weight the tire is holding up.  The more weight the more pressure you need in the tire..

NOW.. Some folks will scream at what I'm about to say but sometimes one side is heavier than the other and thus needs more air pressure (Some folks say Same pressure both sides. but that is not the correct way to do it) You need independent wheel weights to determine the proper pressure. FOR EACH WHEEL.. (not tire but wheel).

If you are under inflated the tire will "Self correct" somewhat by overheating.
 

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