Replacing fuel tank

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

malexander

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2015
Posts
638
Location
Oklahoma City, OK
When I bought my motor home,it was raining. I didn't want to crawl around underneath of it "inspecting" everything. It looked so good on top.

A few day later, after I got it home, I was crawling around underneath it trying to see what I could do to add an "extend-a-stay" to the propane system. There is some rust on the frame, the propane line was really rusty (I replaced it and added my own version of extend-a-stay). The fuel tank is really rusty and appears to be "weeping" a little at one of the seams. There is never a wet spot on the ground under it, even after sitting for couple of months.

My question is, does anyone know how much trouble or expensive it is to replace the fuel tank? It's a 90 gallon diesel tanks on/in a 2007 Fleetwood Bounder 38N. Freightliner chassis. I'd like to put in a larger tank if possible. There's quite a bit of room ahead, and behind it in the frame.
 

TheBar

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2018
Posts
1,286
Location
MS
I have replaced tanks with alternatives when the original tank was no longer available. A few problems you may run into are:

1. The fuel level sender unit. These come in various bolt patterns and resistance. The resistance must match your dash gauge or you have to use an aftermarket gauge. The resistance level is hard to find info on older vehicles.
2. Mounting points. Make sure you can run additional straps without interference.
3. Location of filler neck can be on side, top, or bottom.
4. Fuel lines may have to be rerouted.
 

sandpsycho

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Posts
20
My biggest question is how to get a 90 or in my case a 100 gallon tank out from under the rig.
 

HueyPilotVN

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 5, 2012
Posts
2,591
Location
Lake Havasu City, AZ
sandpsycho said:
My biggest question is how to get a 90 or in my case a 100 gallon tank out from under the rig.


First you raise the motorhome to give you room to lower the tank. Use plenty of safety stands to protect yourself.

Pump out as much of the fuel as possible to reduce the weight.

Disconnect as many of the lines and wires as possible including the filler tube and return fuel lines.

Use a transmission jack with a piece of plywood that will fit between the straps and give support to as big an area as you can.

Remove the straps that are holding the tank in place.

You may have to remove any lines or wires that we not accessable without lowering it.

Lower the tank with some help to stabilize it as it comes down.  Any fuel left in the tank will make it heavier.

Good Luck.







 

sandpsycho

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Posts
20
HueyPilotVN said:
First you raise the motorhome to give you room to lower the tank. Use plenty of safety stands to protect yourself.

Pump out as much of the fuel as possible to reduce the weight.

Disconnect as many of the lines and wires as possible including the filler tube and return fuel lines.

Use a transmission jack with a piece of plywood that will fit between the straps and give support to as big an area as you can.

Remove the straps that are holding the tank in place.

You may have to remove any lines or wires that we not accessable without lowering it.

Lower the tank with some help to stabilize it as it comes down.  Any fuel left in the tank will make it heavier.

Good Luck.

Getting the tank free from the rig is easy it's the simple raise the 25,000-30,000 lbs that gets a bit more difficult. And we are talking a few feet as, at lest on my rig, the tank it tall wide and kinda long.
 

Lou Schneider

Site Team
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
11,794
On my 1994 Damon Intruder, I was able to use the HWH jacks to raise the rear end high enough to get the tank out.

Just be sure to reinforce the hydraulic jacks with appropriately rated jack stands before you go underneath.
 
Top Bottom