RV Covers

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kattbird

New member
Joined
May 21, 2006
Posts
4
I found some topics on RV covers but it seemed they were more directed at motor homes. We have a travel trailer and want to keep it in the best condition we can. The RV stays at a campground year round and near the bay/ocean, so overnight the air gets a little damp, and on nice days the sun beats down on it most of the day. We've been looking at some at Campingworld but not sure what to go with. The RV will not be used in the winter time.
Thanks
 

Ron

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Posts
18,082
Location
Home is where we park it
Same allies to travel trailers as motorhmes.  I DO NOT recommend using a cover on any motorhome or trailer.  Covers tend to damage finish when the wind blows. 
 

pavlov

New member
Joined
Sep 22, 2006
Posts
2
Get this....

I put a tarp over my trailer roof every winter. I too keep it in a campground all year, but I am in northern Michigan where the wind blows nasty, and the rain/snow can be crazy.

The reason I cover it it because I would HATE to come back to a water damaged interior in the Spring. To me, that's worth the minor deterioration of the finish to make sure the inside stays dry during the winter. I have no leaks that I am aware of, but when you are away from it for 7 months, you can't be sure what's going to happen.

What I have is a 30' Travel Trailer. It's a 27' long box, and 8 feet wide. I bought a tarp long enough and wide enough to hang over the front and the sides by 2-4 feet.

Here's where it gets weird......

I go around to all the grommet holes on the tarp, and loop a pseudo-rubber band through them. I make these rubber bands from old disposed-of truck (18 wheeler) inner tubes. I cut them up like slicing a big pie, about 1" to 1.5" wide. Loop them through the grommet holes.

Then I tie a piece of rope to each of the rubber bands, and cut them rope to apprpriate length so that it's tugging the rubber band a bit. At the other end of the rope I tie a loop, and use a little "S" hook to secure the rope somewhere under the trailer.

The rubber bands act as a little bit of a "snubber". You boaters may know what I mean by that. It provides a little "give" to the setup so that when a strong wind comes, there is a little less tension on the rope or the tarp itself, so over time the rope will not break, and the tarp is less likely to tear.

In the Spring, remove the "S" hooks, and leave everything else intact. re-use the setup the next Fall.
 
M

MTRancher

Guest
I cover my 5th wheel every winter. It sits out in the open were the winter wind will blow up to 65-70 at times. So far I haven't seen any damage or finish deterioration as a result of using the cover; but I'm sure it could happen.
I think the benefits of protecting the roof; the seams; the gaskets from the tough Montana UV and weather far outweighs the risk of cosmetic damage.
All and all I think maintanence is the most important thing to enjoying the use of a trailer/camper. How a camper looks is part of the maintanence but how it performs when you are on vacation is my #1 priority.

That said; if you chose to cover your camper make sure you get a size that is closest to your camper size so you don't have to cinch it up everywhere, and pay the extra for one that breaths, the moisture that could be trapped inside a poor cover would do way more damage then not covering it at all.
 

rbell

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2006
Posts
706
Location
Jackson, Michigan
I had a cover for my previous trailer a Trailermanor which folds down. Even at that height it was difficult to get on. It has to be carefully moved over all the stuff on top so as not to damage anything. Then the wind rubbed the paint and scratched it in several areas. Any sharp areas had to have foam put on them so it would not rub thru in the wind. Now the most aggravating thing. We can't leave for Fla. till mid February so when I go to remove it it would be frozen down in some areas on top. This meant pouring hot water on it to get it loose, really fun in a snow storm. The only good suggestion I ever got about that was to leave before it got that cold. I got a Maxlite trailer with a rubber roof which is guaranteed not to leak for several years. Also the dealer I bought it from said not to put a cover on it as they cause more damage than they prevent, but he took my old trailer with the cover in on trade.
 
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