The best battery for the money?

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azbeachboy

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Sep 12, 2005
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Location
Tucson,Az
I have a fifth wheel with two slide outs. I've been having problems getting the large one to come in and now out.  I have no problem at all with the small slide. The last trip I brought a battery charger with me.  I think the battery is fried because it didn't take the charge. I hooked up jumper cables from my truck to the trailer battery and the slid poped right in. The old battery has
Dp27
ca32 degrees
cca
cold crank 625
on the top of it. The trailer lives in Mexico,so I'd like to get the right battery the first time.  The old battery is the type you add water to.
Thank you,
Chuck
 

Tom

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Chuck

Since the trailer might be stored somewhere you can't/don't get to very often, I'd suggest you buying an AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat) battery. They're more expensive than a lead-acid battery, but you won't need to worry about them running dry. You can get AGMs in group 27 size, similar to what you have now. I'd also suggest you install a battery isolator switch if the trailer doesn't already have one.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
Your old battery may not even be a deep cycle - it does not appear to have the rating numbers tha would typically be found on a deep cycle type, e.g. Reserve Capacity [RC] Minutes and/or Amp-hours (AH).  The CCA rating indicates your present battery was designed to start engines rather than provide long term power.

Get a new one. An AGM is probably the best choice, but a good quality lead acid (flooded cell) deep cycle battery will do the job for 2-3 years.  On a cost per year basis, the AGM and a lead acid will probably work out about the same, but the AGM will require less maintenance and is less likley to leave you without power when you need it.
 

azbeachboy

Active member
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Posts
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Location
Tucson,Az
Thank's for the information,I think I'll go with the agm. At Batteries Plus today they were $137.00 and at Walmart they were $80.00.
Chuck
 

Tom

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As Gary mentioned, make sure they are deep cycle batteries, not starting batteries or the combination ones they sell as "marine batteries".
 

Ned

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USA
Be sure to follow Tom and Gary's advice.  The only RV batteries I can find at the http://www.batteriesplus.com web site are starting or deep cycle/starting marine batteries and no mention of AGM at all.  Also, the prices seem unreasonable low for a deep cycle AGM battery suitable for RV use.  They will typically cost $150 and up for a 6V 220AAH battery and you would need 2 of those for an RV.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I think I paid $180 each for the Lifeline Group 27 12V AGM I bought about 18 months ago at an FMCA rally.  Fifth wheels may be equipped with only  one or two 12V batteries and those are often Group 24's.  They usually have room for a 27, but may not have the height available for a pair of taler 6V GC batteries.
 

azbeachboy

Active member
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Posts
33
Location
Tucson,Az
I have only one battery (27) but have enough room for two. Right now I only have one box to hold a battery.
Chuck
 

Carl L

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Mar 14, 2005
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Location
west Los Angeles
I have only one battery (27) but have enough room for two. Right now I only have one box to hold a battery.

Then get another box and buy two new deep cycle batteries.? ?If you comptemplate any boondocking at all you will need two.? ? Always use two identical batteries bought at the same time.?

As others have said here, be sure to get a purely deep cycle battery -- AGM or lead acid flooded.? Do? not get anything labeled automotive, starting, dual purpose,? or marine starting-deep cycle.  To deliver a starting current a battery needs lots of thin plates and this makes them vulnerable to damage in the event of a deep discharge.  This is the exact opposite of the requirement for a good deep cycle battery which is a few thick plates that can deliver a steady current over a period of hours and withstand deep discharge without too much damage.

If you remote store your trailer and you have no access to shore power at the site, seriously consider a solar system to maintain charge on the batteries during storage.? 100W should do nicely.

 

azbeachboy

Active member
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Posts
33
Location
Tucson,Az
Thank you, for all the good information. I use the trailer about two weekends a month. I really don't think the trailer is going any where but the Mexican town that it lives in. The storage lot doesn't have any hook ups to charge the battery. I'll look into the solar system.
Chuck
 
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