Tire Replcement

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skirk55

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Today we were looking at our tires and have decided to replace all four of them on our fifth wheel. The rv dealer gave us prices on tires we have never seen before. It seems china makes most tire brands.
We need 235-85R-16LT_the tires say LT we asked why light  truck tires and not trailer tires? Are LT tires better than trailer tires? Will it matter?  :eek:
 

Karsty

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I can't give you the technical answer you are looking for ... but I will add my 2? regarding tires made in China.

I know, I know ... almost everything is MADE IN CHINA these days and therein lies part of the problem with the failing economy in North America. We are putting people out of work and just shooting ourselves in the foot. I would be looking first at tires that might be made in North America. I believe Michelin still makes tires in Nova Scotia ... not sure if they have other plants around North America or not.

But darn it all ... we have to start looking for things made in North America. In the short term we may be saving money on the immediate purchase ... but in the long term we are dying a slow economic death.

Just my 2?.
 

Seajay

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quote.. I believe Michelin still makes tires in Nova Scotia ...quote...
With respect sir, mine have Made in France embossed  on the side of the tires.  I did replace two new front tires with Good Year tires and I believe these are still made in the USA but I would not bet my lunch money on it.
FWIW I too try to buy items made in the USA but on some things it is just not possible any more.  Computers and cameras and about all of our electronics are imported now. 
 

Karsty

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Seajay said:
quote.. I believe Michelin still makes tires in Nova Scotia ...quote...
With respect sir, mine have Made in France embossed  on the side of the tires.  I did replace two new front tires with Good Year tires and I believe these are still made in the USA but I would not bet my lunch money on it.
FWIW I too try to buy items made in the USA but on some things it is just not possible any more.  Computers and cameras and about all of our electronics are imported now.

I'm sure that some tires are made in France. But Michelin still produces in Granton, Bridgewater, and Waterville, all in Nova Scotia. Maybe not the make or model you need. I guess it is just a case of doing one's homework and sorting through what ones's priorities are.

Mine are purchasing what I can in North America when possible and that includes tires. At the rate we are going I'm sure that everything we purchase will be MADE IN CHINA or some foregin country. Fortunatley, I don't think I will be around to see that day come.  :-\
 

99WinAdventurer37G

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Michelin makes tires in Alabama, Indiana, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Carolina and South Carolina.  I've picked up 53' trailer loads of tires from the plant in OK and SC.  There are many great brands made here in the USA.  Chinese tires usually are constructed of different rubber compounds than those made in the US.  They(China) save money both on labor AND materials. 
 

donn

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St tires are only certified as trailer only tires.  They have a low speed rating.  There are hundreds of comments all over the internet about how bad they are.  Stick with an LT tire.  You wont regret it.  BTW both Michelin bfgoodrich and firestone make an excellent tire suitable for trailer service.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I've got some bad news for you - Michelin also makes some tires in a Chinese factory.

ST tires are designed for trailer use and have very stiff sidewalls but many of them are of marginal quality and nearly all have the standard speed rating for ST, which is 65 mph. LT tires aren't quite as stiff in the sidewall as ST, but will have a minimum speed rating of 75 mph.  I like to use LT if the trailer has 16" wheels - there is a wide choice of high quality brands in LTs and the prices are more competitive as well. Just make sure the load rating is sufficient for  the trailer axle weights (as you must with any tire). BF Goodrich Commercia T/A comes in that LT size; so does Good year Wrangler and Michelin LTX.

If you would prefer ST tires, try the Maxxis brand. They make a high quality tire with higher speed rating than the mandated 65 minimum. But they will be pricey in that size.
 

skirk55

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The speed of 65mph is ok with my. I never pull over that. We have seen what 75 mph in a 5 wheel and a flat will do to people and there rigs. We are looking at Carlie st tires. Anyone out there pull with them?
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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The issue with the 65 mph rating is that you don't want to be driving all day long with the tire turning at its max rated speed (or its max load either, but that's another issue). Driving the rig on the highway, especially an interstate, is likely to do just that.  Running a tire at its max capability is a sure way to get a short life. Whether that is a few months or a few years is hard to say, but pushing the limits always leads to a shorter than average life.
 

Mopar1973Man

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Like me I've got TowMax ST's on my TT and I never tow any faster than 55 MPH maybe 60 MPH if I'm passing someone but that's rare. No issues here. Just slow down and stay away from limitations of the tire and they will last a very long time without blow out failures.
 

skirk55

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The dealer just told me I have to use LT tires. People told me trailer tires work better. My rig needs 14000 gross weight raited tires. What  now?
 

FastEagle

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skirk55 said:
The dealer just told me I have to use LT tires. People told me trailer tires work better. My rig needs 14000 gross weight raited tires. What  now?

It seems you may have little experience with selecting replacement tires. I?m just going to give you some industry guidelines to follow. Some do, some don?t.

All the information you need to make a sound judgment has been provided by the vehicle manufacturer.  It?s in your trailer?s owner?s manual and on the vehicle?s certification label.

The government is not going to recommend any tire over another one. They are just going to give you the size, load capacity and recommended tire pressure for that vehicle as determined by the vehicle manufacturer.

Some tire dealers will not recommend or install LT tires when the vehicle?s certification label shows the vehicle came equipped with the Special Trailer (ST) tires. That?s because there are some pretty powerful industry supporters, such as the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA), that do not recommend that replacement fitment.

The best option is the one that will fit the situation. If you?re a casual travel not going far from home and only a few times a year than go with replacement tires that match the information on the certification label. For longer and more frequent journeys you should consider going up a load range from the Original Equipment (OE) tires. For full timers the tires should be at lease able to carry the full load of the GAWR plus a reserve load capacity of 12-15%.

Having been a full timer I like to have tires with some kind of warranty. So be careful when selecting tires that differ from those recommended on the certification label. Many of the major tire manufacturers are being more protective of their market and are using the DOT safety regulations depicted in current vehicle owner?s manuals as reference to not cover tires not meeting those requirements. Here is an example from Michelin.

Michelin Warranty information for replacement tires.

What Is Not Covered!

Applies to replacement tires purchased on or after March 1, 2011.

? Use of MICHELIN? tires that is inconsistent with the safety information provided in your owner?s manual.

? Use of MICHELIN? tires that is inconsistent with the maintenance information provided in your owner?s manual.

FastEagle
 

Carl L

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skirk55 said:
The dealer just told me I have to use LT tires. People told me trailer tires work better. My rig needs 14000 gross weight raited tires. What  now?
14,000 less 20% tongue weight = 11,200 lbs.

11,200 lbs divided between 4 wheels = 2800 lbs per wheel. 

Michelin  LT235/85R16/E  120 Q  (P/N 13080}  has load rating of 3042 lbs @80 psi.    [see http://www.michelinman.com/tire-selector/category/light-truck/xps-rib/tire-details ]

Looks good to me.  Now the problem is paying for them.    ::)


 

donn

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Actually any of the LT235 85R16 tires on the market will have at least a 3042 load rating.  Perfect tires for 6K axle equipped trailers.  If your trailer is equipped with 7K axles then the best solution is to upgrade to 17.5 inch tires/wheels.  May not be cheap, but the alternative is constant tire problems.
 

Rancher Will

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Mountains of Colorado
The subject of trailer tires has been discussed many times in many places. I suspect that most everyone has their opinion. Mine is mine only and worth only what it costs you to read this.

In my business as a Rancher and Trucking Business owner for over50 years, I have bought multi dozens of tires for autos, light trucks, semi trucks and trailers, tractors, ranch trailers, implements, and RV's, etc.

I have discussed tires with our tire dealers over the years and have been happy with their recomendations for the most part. The dealers who give me good service and who stand behind their tires sold, always tell me that I can expect the best service by using trailer tires on trailers, including Semi Trailers, Ranch Trailers and RV Trailers. I am told that the trailer tires are designed for proper flexing support action in turns when the tires are "dragged sideways on the turn".  On our equipment, light and heavy, I install steering tires on the front and traction tires on the rear, and trailer tires on the trailers. Implement and tractor tires are not pertinent to this post.

In the very few times when we had tire defect failure, both the dealer and manufacturer honored the warranty except once with Michelin when the Dealer honored the warranty when Michelin refused. Goodyear, Bridgestone and Cooper have each honored their Road Hazzard Warranty with me also at least once.
 

skirk55

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Newtown Pa. 18940
Thank you everyone for the help. In all the years  we have pulled we have had one flat. We have never replaced our tires. Now I was not ready for this. I found dry rot between the treads. Then I decided to replace all of the tires now. I was so disapointed to find Chinese tires! What is up with this. Trailer life magazine needs to do an article on tires. Next will I purchase Chinese tires for my truck.
 

pojo

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Michigan
Just replaced the Carlisle Bias ply (ST205-75-14 C) with the good ole American Goodyear "Marathon" trailer tire (ST205-75-R14 C) on my tow dolly. Checked the DOT date code on the new set: 3212. The date code stamp was right next to the words: MADE IN CHINA.  :eek:
 

donn

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pojo said:
Just replaced the Carlisle Bias ply (ST205-75-14 C) with the good ole American Goodyear "Marathon" trailer tire (ST205-75-R14 C) on my tow dolly. Checked the DOT date code on the new set: 3212. The date code stamp was right next to the words: MADE IN CHINA.  :eek:

So you got some infamous China bombs then huh?  Not a tire made in America.  Now you need to hope that one of them does not self destruct and cause damage to your trailer.  Next time look at Maxxis.  At least they are made in Taiwan or Thailand and have a decent reputation.
 

eliallen

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donn said:
  At least they are made in Taiwan or Thailand and have a decent reputation.
Are you sure that is the only place?

Maxxis has manufacturing facilities in locations including Yuan Lin, Taiwan; Xiamen, China; Kunshan, China; Rayong Province, Thailand; and Vietnam.
Maxxis has technology centers in Yuan Lin, Taiwan and Kunshan, China. The Maxxis proving ground is located in Kunshan.
 

skirk55

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Newtown Pa. 18940
Everything I have looked at in reviews have problems. Price will not get you better tires. Today I looked at a 2013 keystone fifth wheel and I have never seen the tire mfg before!
I will never purchase tires for price. My dog is in that truck.
In two years we will trade this trailer in and get a new $80,000.00 trailer with cheap Chinese tires?
 
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