Towing Vehicle?

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DRP

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Does anyone use a Chevy Colorado as their tow vehicle?  I am looking at buying an RV, but not sure how my TV will tow at the max weight of 4,000.  Any tips would be great, thanks.
 

Terry A. Brewer

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DRP

>>I am looking at buying an RV, but not sure how my TV will tow at the max weight of 4,000.<<

It depends on the towing capacity & hitch rating of your RV.? I tow a 4800 lb GMC Envoy with a diesel pusher with no problem. Tom the forum owner tows a Suburban that is even heavier. make sure your hitch, towbar are rated for considerably more than what you want to tow, also use a supplemental breaking system for your toad.


Terry
At Clark Fork, ID
 

Carl L

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DRP said:
Does anyone use a Chevy Colorado as their tow vehicle?? I am looking at buying an RV, but not sure how my TV will tow at the max weight of 4,000.? Any tips would be great, thanks.

A 4000# tow rating will pretty well limit you to tent trailers.  You will want to tow nothing with a weight over 3200-3600# to allow for loading and running at high altitudes as in the West.  That is going to include water and propane plus any stuff you pack in the trailer.  Even with tent trailers it pays to be careful about weights, some of the dry weights I see listed are upwards of 3800#.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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4000# isn't much tow capacity - you will be limited to the larger tent trailers and  Hi-lo's or the smaller hydrids.  Is that what you had in mind?  Those sorts of trailers can still be very nicely equipped, so you won't exactly be "roughing it".
 

DRP

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I have been looking at the smaller hybrids, I am not sure about getting a tent trailer due to the fact that I will be using it as a hunting camp in the fall and we occasionally get a heavy, wet snowfall or two during that time.  I am afraid that I will have problems with the tent trailer not holding up to the weight of the snow.  I have also looked at the shadow cruiser line of TT.  Very light weight, but I haven't seen the inside of one yet.  I drove down today to see one, but the lot closed early today after I drove for an hour to get there.  Oh well, not the end of the world.  I am looking for something big enough for 2 adults, 2 kids and a dog.  Thanks for the tips.
 

Carl L

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DRP said:
I have been looking at the smaller hybrids, I am not sure about getting a tent trailer due to the fact that I will be using it as a hunting camp in the fall and we occasionally get a heavy, wet snowfall or two during that time.? I am afraid that I will have problems with the tent trailer not holding up to the weight of the snow.? I have also looked at the shadow cruiser line of TT.? Very light weight, but I haven't seen the inside of one yet.? I drove down today to see one, but the lot closed early today after I drove for an hour to get there.? Oh well, not the end of the world.? I am looking for something big enough for 2 adults, 2 kids and a dog.? Thanks for the tips.

OK!? ?Then what you may be looking for is a Casitas trailer or something like it.? ?The 17 footer may well do you.? The shell construction should handle a snow load better than any canvas arrangement.? Go to http://www.casitatraveltrailers.com/home.html 
 

DRP

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Thank you.  I will have to check them out.  I have had a couple of people recommend both the Casitas and the Scamp.  Are there any down sides to ordering factory direct, such as maintenance, warranty work, financing, etc. ?  I am new to this and just don't want to get a trailer that we will not be happy with.  I know with the restriction on my towing capacity I will have to make some sacrifices, but want to have a good time while we are out.  My wife is not much of a camper so I want her to be as comfortable as possible.  I still have time before I buy so I want to see what is out there.  Thanks  again for your advice.

dp
 

Carl L

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DRP said:
Thank you.? I will have to check them out.? I have had a couple of people recommend both the Casitas and the Scamp.? Are there any down sides to ordering factory direct, such as maintenance, warranty work, financing, etc. ?? I am new to this and just don't want to get a trailer that we will not be happy with.? I know with the restriction on my towing capacity I will have to make some sacrifices, but want to have a good time while we are out.? My wife is not much of a camper so I want her to be as comfortable as possible.? I still have time before I buy so I want to see what is out there.? Thanks? again for your advice.

dp

As I have frequently stated here, trailers are simple devices.  There is no drive train, no complex suspension.  They are merely boxes set on a ladder frame with simple suspension, frequently only leaf springs without even shock absorbers.  All the appliances used come from a handful of national manufacturers like Dometic or Coleman and carry their own guarantees separate from the trailer manufacturer.  What you see is largely what you get.  Frankly RV QC is not all that it should be.  However, most of the miseries are simple and for the most part repairable by a reasonably handy householder with only minor cussing.

One thing you should get clear with everyone in the family.  Vacation trailers are not houses, they are 'cabins in the woods'.  You sleep in them and use them for toilet facilities.  Most of your living will be done out of doors, resorting to the trailer only in inclement weather.  Campground tables are your dining room, camp chairs are your sitting room.  An awning is your most used accessory.  A lot of folks even carry a campstove and do much of their cooking outside.  Good campgrounds are designed around this.  Great campgrounds make it a regenerating experience.
 

fring7

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Aug 3, 2006
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Got back last night from our 10 day excursion into the Rockies.
I have a new Chevy Colorado and a new JAYCO Jayfeather 165 sport.
The Colorado performed marvellously!
Had many occasions to pass full sized trucks pulling trailers on steep upgrades.
We camped in Whitecourt Alberta,then on through Jasper,overnighted in Blue River British Columbia, drove straight through to Chiliwack B.C.
On the way back we toured the southern B.C rockies on a different route.
These are some of the most challenging highways in western Canada.
I dont think you should be afraid to use a 5 cylinder Colorado with the right trailer and equipment. Ther are many good trailers under 3000 lbs that are more than suitable for small families(We have a 7 year old girl)
Had my truck and trailer weighed at a goverment weigh station.Came in at 7758 lbs total.
Axle 1 was 2508
Axle 2 was 2500
Axle 3 was 2750
GM's max. total weight recommendation for the Colorado + trailer + people and stuff is 9000lbs
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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fring7,
The actual weights indicate  you are in good shape with your rig - roughly 15% under the GCWR. You are in the range where you should perform very well on the route you mentioned, which has some long mountain grades but nothing truly daunting. Congratulations on selecting well on both truck and trailer - you obviously did your homework!  :D  And glad you  had the opportunity to enjoy a trip through the Canadian Rockies - it is some of the most beautiful scenery in the entire world.
 

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