Travel trailer in winter

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bluesky6

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Jun 16, 2005
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Hello, I just joined the forum.

We just sold our tent trailer (after using it for a year) and are looking to get something larger and more convenient.

My wife is interested in a Class C but the prices are way too high. I, on the other hand, am looking at a travel trailer since we've already got an F350 crewcab.

One of the things I was thinking of was using the trailer when we go skiing in Lake Tahoe in winter :  campground costs are cheaper than hotel rates for 4 people.

How practical would this be? Would we have trouble with propane tanks and the other tanks freezing up on us? Would we freeze too?

Thanks!


Ben
 

Carl L

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bluesky6 said:
Hello, I just joined the forum.

We just sold our tent trailer (after using it for a year) and are looking to get something larger and more convenient.

My wife is interested in a Class C but the prices are way too high. I, on the other hand, am looking at a travel trailer since we've already got an F350 crewcab.

One of the things I was thinking of was using the trailer when we go skiing in Lake Tahoe in winter :? campground costs are cheaper than hotel rates for 4 people.

How practical would this be? Would we have trouble with propane tanks and the other tanks freezing up on us? Would we freeze too?

Better get a trailer with winterization.  One brand, not necessarily recommended, but worth looking at, is Arctic Fox at http://www.northwoodmfg.com/fox-trailers.htm.

What is need is heavier insulation, heated tanks, and so forth. 
 

Ron

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Hi and welcome to the RV Forum.  Carl has given you a good recommendation and another would be the Teton trailers made in Casper Wyo.  The are heavy but they are very well built and insulated.
 

bluesky6

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Jun 16, 2005
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Thanks for the advice.

I am considering either the Extreme Sportsmaster 194TS or Fleetwood Mallard 180CK which are small travel traiers that can sleep 5 or more (translated to mean 4 adults).

The 194TS claims to have "EZ-winterization" as well.

Does anyone have an opinion on either of these two models or brands?

Thanks.

Ben
 

Carl L

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bluesky6 said:
Thanks for the advice.

I am considering either the Extreme Sportsmaster 194TS or Fleetwood Mallard 180CK which are small travel traiers that can sleep 5 or more (translated to mean 4 adults).

The 194TS claims to have "EZ-winterization" as well.

Does anyone have an opinion on either of these two models or brands?

If you intend to house 4 adults in either of those, they will have to be vary friendly....very.  Two adults is more like it.  Find out what EZ winterization means.  It could mean either winterization for storage, or winter operation.  You want the latter.
 

John From Detroit

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Davison Michigan
One comment about travel trailers (and/or Motor Homes) in the winter..... My soon to be towed is still at the dealer being modified for towing. (I have a motor home) I was there yesterday and had to get some stuff out of it (Like the pressure Pro Mointor and a check for $500 I forgot was in it, thought I'd mailed said check)

Well.... We walked back into the shop with a dealer rep and an insurance adjuster (not for us) seems an RV owner (Trailer in fact) had failed to properly drain the hot water heater before putting his trailer away for the Michigan Winter.... Come spring, GOD drained it for him.

Yup, when the water froze, it expanded, alas, the metal sides of the hot water tank did not expand in the same way, split the seam rather nicely

A lesson painlesselly learned in my case... Not so painless for the trailer owner though
 

Lou Schneider

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One of the things I was thinking of was using the trailer when we go skiing in Lake Tahoe in winter :  campground costs are cheaper than hotel rates for 4 people.
Check with Caltrans.  California bannes bumper pull trailers (travel trailers) in the mountains whenever chain requirements are in effect.  I'm not sure, but I think 5th wheel trailers (with chains) are allowed in certain conditions.
 

Carl L

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Check with Caltrans.? California bannes bumper pull trailers (travel trailers) in the mountains whenever chain requirements are in effect.? I'm not sure, but I think 5th wheel trailers (with chains) are allowed in certain conditions

I do not know about that.? The California Dept. of Motor Vehicles, in their pamphlet on Recreational Vehicles and Trailers makes the following statement:

Snow

Always carry drive wheel and trailer wheel chains when you travel in snow country. Know how to put them on. Chains are needed for both the tow vehicle and for one axle of a trailer.


That quote is from the DMV website and is dated 2003.

The California Hwy Patrol on their website in a FAQ list states:

"R" ratings on snowy roads indicate chain requirements for various conditions. Some vehicles may not be required to use chains under all conditions, but all vehicles must carry chains. Most vehicles come equipped with snow tires. Look for M+S (mud and snow), All Season, or All Terrain, on the side of the tire.

R-1? ?chains required except for vehicles with snow tires (chains required for any vehicle pulling a trailer)

R-2? ?chains required except for 4-wheel drive with snow tires

R-3? ?chains required for all vehicles


So it would appear to me that one can pull a trailer under chain control conditions in California with the proviso that you have chains on the tow vehicle, even if 4WD and with snow tires, and one axle of the trailer must have chains on its tires.  The later provision I suspect is to assist braking action for the trailer.
 

leahmm

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Jan 26, 2006
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Hi all. My first time here too.  If i may, tap into this convo, i have sort of the same questions.  My husband wants to take a trip from Dallas (its nice and warm here) to Santa Fe and Taos in the next few weeks.  I'm very worried about pulling an RV in that area especially this time of year.  From what i've been reading, we need to worry about snow tires, temps in the RV at night, snow caving in the roof, water freezing, etc...  any other things i'm missing?  Am i worrying too much or are my fears sound?  I should mention that we've never RV'd before.
 

Carl L

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Current conditions at Santa Fe are not too bleak.  Nights in the 20s, days in the 50s.  Dunno how much snow is on the ground.  Maybe one of our New Mexicans can give you the scoop on that.  There should not be all that much

Warm days and cold nights should not be a problem with most trailers, winterized or not.  You will use a bunches of propane and you should be hooked up with at least electric.  Probably a good idea to unhook your water hose and allow it to drain at night.  Stay in a trailer park at as low an altitude as you can.  There is at least one decent one just outside of Santa Fe that we stayed at.  Drive to the snow/mountains in your unhitched truck.

Chains?  Well yeah, a pair for the truck and another for the trailer,  but I doubt if you will actually need them.  Do carry them tho.  Snow tires -- why?    You are just visiting, you are not going to live there  -  right?  :)
 
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