TV Question?

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downer22

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Feb 14, 2006
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I just bought a 1994 Jayco Eagle 29' that did not come with a TV.  It has the antenna and 2 hookups for a TV.  My question is should I buy a TV that runs on AC/DC, or just a DC TV and use an inverter while on the road?  What type of TVs do RVs usually come with?  I am lookig at a TV/DVD combo.  Thanks for your assistance.
 

JerArdra

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You have a 1994 coach that may not have an Inverter to charge your batteries; it probably has a converter that will not charge your batteries adequately.  Therefore, you would be advised to get an AC/DC TV so you can run it for an entire evening whenever you are not plugged in to 120 volt power.

JerryF
 

Jim Dick

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downer22 said:
I just bought a 1994 Jayco Eagle 29' that did not come with a TV.  It has the antenna and 2 hookups for a TV.  My question is should I buy a TV that runs on AC/DC, or just a DC TV and use an inverter while on the road?  What type of TVs do RVs usually come with?  I am lookig at a TV/DVD combo.  Thanks for your assistance.

Most RVs I've seen come with AC TVs. Many do have a DC outlet if you wish to have a DC or AC/DC TV. If you plan on boondocking for a short period and the rig doesn't have an inverter then you would probably want a DC or AC/DC TV.
 

Karl

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Jerry,

Sorry, but I have to disagree with you. There are very few ac/dc units out there, especially tv's with a dvd player, and I think the advantage of having a separate a/c tv and dvd player with a small inverter (400 watts?) would be a better choice. The t.v could be run by itself without the added drain of the dvd when watching local t.v. stations, and the inverter could serve double duty by powering other small appliances - either seperately or while watching t.v. There's also the disadvantage of having to plug/unplug the dc power adapter and/or line cord when switching from one power source to another.
 

joelmyer

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I'm with Karl on both counts for the same reasons.  I have a 5er that didn't come with TV - we have a small ac TV & Tovo that we power with a seperate interter when necessary.
 

JerArdra

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Karl,

Good point Karl.  I did not take into account that the DVD electronics might be turned on EVERY TIME the TV is on.  Yes, separate the two.  Two different units might be one way of doing it and the other way is to use a small inverter with separate 120 volt TV and DVD units.  From experience I found that converters do a VERY poor job of charging two 6-volt batteries.  Maybe they are better today.

Our first 18 and 22 foot Class Cs had 12 volt TVs because they had converters only so we always ran the TV on 12 volts no matter what.

JerryF
 

Jim Dick

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Jer,

Another reason for getting two separate units is failure. If together and one fails, the whole unit needs to be returned for repair so you have nothing.
 

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