Ultra Beginner Question...What size if Parking Spot Do I Need

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

MSimpson

Member
Joined
May 7, 2019
Posts
5
My husband are.researching the possibility of buying a 5th wheel, maybe about a 35'.  Here's the question ....when parking a rig of that size what size of space would we need in the RV park?  Do you book a 30 foot spot and hang over, or get a 40 foot spot.  Are 40 foot spots hard to find?
Also how hard are RV spots to find going I to the summer.......I keep going on line  and looking for.spots (just to see about available), and it seems alot.of place.are already booked for the days I search for.
Thanks.
 
Generally you just tell the park you have a 35 (or whatever it is).  Even online, there is often a question about RV length - just give the answer.

If you have to pick by size measurement alone, choose a length that matches the RV or maybe a couple feet more. You can probably fit on smaller sites (and overhang), but I would not choose that unless there were no decent alternatives.

There is no good answer about finding a given size - each campground varies.  Some of lots of larger sites, while others may be cramped even for 25-30 footers. We drove a 40 ft motohome for years and never felt like finding a site was difficult, but you quickly learn what sorts of facilities to look for.
 
The size limit might not actually be a limitation of the site itself, but access to the site.
 
When I park my 39' Alpine at CountryFest, they give me a sport that is 18 x 40.  I get there way early so I am able to drive through.

So, it depends...
 
Simply put sometimes those 30 ft sites are really 30, 31, 32 feet long, other times they are 45+, also it seems commercial campgrounds are more prone to shoe horning you into the smallest site that you will fit in if you don't have a specific site reserved than public campgrounds.
 
One of the variables is that there is no widely accepted standard for measuring a campsite.  Each park comes up with its own figures, which may represent the total length & width of the site, or just the area thought to be easily usable. It usually does not reflect any "overhang" potential, but that's not for sure either. Besides, different RVs have differing ability to hang over on one end.  Some campgrounds make allowance for terrain or only measure the portion of the site that is graded and leveled for parking (the "pad").

I've seen (and used) 40 ft sites that were 100+ ft long and others that were 39.5 ft. I recall one very nice site that was about 75 ft long, but getting into it required a sharp left turn off a narrow access road. Getting a 40 ft coach onto the site required careful maneuvering, but it was roomy once there.
 
When I've paid any attention to this issue, it seems to me that usually they take into account in that size limit that you'll have another vehicle to park....either a tow or a toad, and give a little room...so basically under sizing each spot.  Once in a while we'll get in a site with not much extra room, but usually in those cases I don't recall if they put me in an undersized spot or not, knowing I didn't have a toad
 
Space for either a tow vehicle or a toad may or may not be in line with the RV parking area. I've been in campgrounds that had marked parking spots along the road, like city street parking, or campgrounds that expected you to pull up along side the RV, others that required you to park crosswise in front, and a few that simply had given no thought at all to where you put your other vehicles. Your problem, not theirs. Even a few that had small parking lots scattered among the sites, what I think of as "park & walk". Just about any arrangement you can imagine is possible and in use.  I haven't come across a campground parking garage yet, but there probably is one somewhere.
 
Gary RV_Wizard said:
Space for either a tow vehicle or a toad may or may not be in line with the RV parking area. I've been in campgrounds that had marked parking spots along the road, like city street parking, or campgrounds that expected you to pull up along side the RV, others that required you to park crosswise in front, and a few that simply had given no thought at all to where you put your other vehicles. Your problem, not theirs. Even a few that had small parking lots scattered among the sites, what I think of as "park & walk". Just about any arrangement you can imagine is possible and in use.  I haven't come across a campground parking garage yet, but there probably is one somewhere.

This just gave me an idea....Valet parking at the campsite..Just call the front office and they will bring your Car/Truck to you. Washed, Waxed and fueled....For a small fee of course. ;D

Oh you laugh now ...But they laughed when campsites started the "Class A's only" rules
 
Gizmo100 said:
This just gave me an idea....Valet parking at the campsite..Just call the front office and they will bring your Car/Truck to you. Washed, Waxed and fueled....For a small fee of course. ;D

Oh you laugh now ...But they laughed when campsites started the "Class A's only" rules

When I was working in Los Angeles, the park I stayed in operated in a similar fashion.  No valet washing/waxing (water shortage in LA, you know) but the owner's philosophy was he was going to treat his guests as if they were staying at a full service hotel, not a RV park.  The office manager doubled as a concierge, booking tickets to shows and other attractions, arranging for rental cars, directing people to local services, etc.

The park was laid out during WWII as housing for the local airfield, so the roads were tight.  There was a fairly wide road going down the middle of the park and narrower roads (with parked cars) at right angles off both sides, about 5 sites deep.

He had a forklift with 5th wheel and bumper hitch attachments on the fork.  New arrivals would unhitch up front when they checked in and the owner would use the forklift to deliver the trailer to the space with a couple of employees acting as spotters.

If you had a motorhome, you'd back it in with the owner standing next to the driver's window, telling you exactly how to turn the wheel, etc.  No muss, no fuss.

Once you were in the space the spotters would make sure the RV was level and hook up the utilities for you.  Many of the guests were foreign visitors who were first time RV renters, so this was very useful for them.

The park was Balboa RV Park in the San Fernando Valley. Today it's called Hollywood RV Park. You can experience all of this for only $65 a night next time you're visiting Los Angeles.

Google Map View
 
Well talk about crushing my dreams :'( :'(

I was looking forward to going into business with Old Gator. He washes and waxes and I count the money.
 
Gizmo100 said:
This just gave me an idea....Valet parking at the campsite..Just call the front office and they will bring your Car/Truck to you. Washed, Waxed and fueled....For a small fee of course. ;D

Oh you laugh now ...But they laughed when campsites started the "Class A's only" rules

Hey! You stole my idea. I bet you?re the guy that stole my idea for free raccoon grooming. I could of made a bunch of money on that ......wait a minute; free raccoon. Never mind, you can have the valet idea.  :-*
 
MSimpson said:
My husband are.researching the possibility of buying a 5th wheel, maybe about a 35'.  Here's the question ....when parking a rig of that size what size of space would we need in the RV park?  Do you book a 30 foot spot and hang over, or get a 40 foot spot.  Are 40 foot spots hard to find?
Also how hard are RV spots to find going I to the summer.......I keep going on line  and looking for.spots (just to see about available), and it seems alot.of place.are already booked for the days I search for.
Thanks.

We have a 35' fifth wheel and love it.  We definitely would not book at 30' spot.  A 35' spot would be marginal depending on the site.  Depending on the campground you can usually call them and ask for advice.  Otherwise you might try researching reviews of the campground to see what other RVers have said about the sites.  Also a satellite view of the site is sometimes helpful.  If you're new to parking a 5th wheel you might want to allow for a little more space until you get the hang of it.  You probably already know that pull through sites are usually great but are often the first sites to get reserved. 

We find that weekends and holidays during the summer are difficult to book especially in popular areas.  So sometimes it's necessary to book well in advance of your travel plans.
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
131,894
Posts
1,386,974
Members
137,648
Latest member
Ronsrn
Back
Top Bottom