What Is This? What Does It Vent?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.
Its for a Suburban gas furnace.  One hole is cold air in, one hole is hot exhaust gasses out.  I assume you have a bed back there?  Look under the bed you should see the gas furnade.
 
AnRVAndADog said:
I have "basement" HVAC. So... When I have the thermostat set to "Heat" this vents the hot air (that I want in the RV) out the back???
If you have the basement heat pump, heat from the heat pump won't work below about 35-40F depending on humidity - the coils will freeze up and signal the thermostat. The thermostat logic will try for x number of times to retry the heat pump and then give up and call for the propane furnace.

My Horizon has a bath area propane furnace which is only ducted in the bedroom/bath area and has the main floor-ducted propane furnace for the main cabin.
 
AnRVAndADog said:
I have "basement" HVAC. So... When I have the thermostat set to "Heat" this vents the hot air (that I want in the RV) out the back???
I'm just not liking the way you said that - that is combustion air that comes out that hole - Carbon Monoxide - don't try to route it back into the coach as a form of heat recovery.    I'm sure you weren't thinking that, but worth a mention I suppose.

The furnace works like your house - a direct vent combustion chamber draws combustion air from the outside through that chrome plate, heats it with a burner inside a box in the furnace, and exhausts combustion air to the outside through that chrome plate.  House air is drawn in through the return air ducts, passes over the heated box to get warm and is distributed through the supply ducts and out through the vents or diffusers.  Combustion air and house air never mix.
 
Mile High said:
I'm just not liking the way you said that - that is combustion air that comes out that hole - Carbon Monoxide - don't try to route it back into the coach as a form of heat recovery.    I'm sure you weren't thinking that, but worth a mention I suppose.
The furnace works like your house - a direct vent combustion chamber draws combustion air from the outside through that chrome plate, heats it with a burner inside a box in the furnace, and exhausts combustion air to the outside through that chrome plate.  House air is drawn in through the return air ducts, passes over the heated box to get warm and is distributed through the supply ducts and out through the vents or diffusers.  Combustion air and house air never mix.

Now I get it...  I likely broke that...  Having an RV Tech guy out this morning to check it out.

I backed into a fence post last Friday at Wekiwa Springs State Park.  Technically I just grazed it. It was mostly obscured by a large overhanging tree branch. I didn't hear or feel anything. I heard the leaves on the branch making noise on the ladder, I applied the brake, then pulled a few feet forward. That's when a bolt protruding from the fence post snagged the bottom of the end cap and yanked it as I pulled forward.

I heard that!

RV Tech guy is an absolute wizard!

Took that vent plate off (the end cap popped halfway back where it should be). Bent it back even, bent the flange around the top pipe back even. Removed some side molding screws, pushed the end cap back in place. Reattached the side molding. Damn sure good enough. Checked everything (parking lights, turn signals, reverse lights, rear slide, HVAC, Generator, etc.).

Scuff marks will buff out. (That's the RV equivalent of "Walk it off.")

 

Attachments

  • Forum_Vent.jpg
    Forum_Vent.jpg
    38.1 KB · Views: 60
Exactly why you should always have a spotter when backing up. Without one, GOAL is a must - Get Out And Look.

Almost 50% of all accidents with large vehicles occur while backing up. Almost 100% are avoidable.
 
What you bent is more or less a cover plate and it can be beaten back into submission.....or straightened. It does have tubes that are attached and slide either over or inside of matching tubes from the furnace. these have a seal around then that I know from experience will go bad. When mine went it allowed furnace gases to escape into the compartment and eventually got into the RV, setting off the alarm. It's worth checking them.
 
  I'm all about GOAL!  Wife helps when working into a hard spot.  I tell her what to look for.  But in the end it is my responsibility.

-Kyle
 
John Canfield said:
If you have the basement heat pump, heat from the heat pump won't work below about 35-40F depending on humidity - the coils will freeze up and signal the thermostat. The thermostat logic will try for x number of times to retry the heat pump and then give up and call for the propane furnace.

Two thumbs up to somebody! About half-a-grunt returned the big cover plate to flat. Another grunt-and-a-half returned the one chromed short pipe's attachment plate to flat. But here's the best part. The two short pipes (one of them slightly different diameter so you can't get them confused) fit into the furnace into rounded-beveled openings! ROUNDED-BEVELED openings. So... No matter how they get yanked out of the furnace, any angle, they can't damage the furnace! Brilliant!
 
catblaster said:
What you bent is more or less a cover plate and it can be beaten back into submission.....or straightened. It does have tubes that are attached and slide either over or inside of matching tubes from the furnace. these have a seal around then that I know from experience will go bad. When mine went it allowed furnace gases to escape into the compartment and eventually got into the RV, setting off the alarm. It's worth checking them.

That's what we did. Bent the main plate and pipe's plate back to flat. Quick and easy. Push the two short pipes back into the furnace's holes, reattach the main plate. I'm feeling like I got real lucky...
 
HappyWanderer said:
Exactly why you should always have a spotter when backing up. Without one, GOAL is a must - Get Out And Look.
Almost 50% of all accidents with large vehicles occur while backing up. Almost 100% are avoidable.

Spotter. That's a problem. The wife is no help there and she's untrainable. Once, a few months ago, she was standing directly behind the RV. Someone from the adjacent campsite ran over to move her to the side... The instant she was out of the mirror I stopped, so there was no danger, but that's an example.

GOAL. I like that, easy to remember. And that was the first of my two mistakes. The fence post was mostly obscured by a large tree branch. I assumed there was no fence post there, I should have GOAL. The second mistake was not halting the instant I heard the scratching of leaves on the ladder.
 
Back
Top Bottom