which is better???

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RogerW

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I am trading my F150 4x4 with the 4.6 for either a 2004 Expedition Eddie Bauer or a 2004 F150 Crew Cab Lariat. Both of these have the 5.4, the tow package and the 3.73 rear axle. Does anyone have any experience with these? Help pleae, I am up against a time crunch as I go pick up my new TT next Friday. I am buying a Zeppelin 271 with a dry weight of just under 5K and a GVWR of 7K.

Opinions please folks.

Thanks

Roger
 
F

Frizlefrak

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"Better" is a relative term.  Do you need a pickup or an SUV?  Both are good vehicles, each is better suited to certain things.

As far as towing your new TT, check the GVWR on the vehicle and do the math.  GVWR minus weight of truck, trailer, passengers, and cargo = spare capacity.  The more spare capacity you have, the easier your life on the road will be.  The closer you approach the limits of the truck, the less fun (and safe) it becomes.  Exceed it, and you have big problems.

Good luck.
 

Carl L

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RogerW said:
I am trading my F150 4x4 with the 4.6 for either a 2004 Expedition Eddie Bauer or a 2004 F150 Crew Cab Lariat. Both of these have the 5.4, the tow package and the 3.73 rear axle. Does anyone have any experience with these? Help pleae, I am up against a time crunch as I go pick up my new TT next Friday. I am buying a Zeppelin 271 with a dry weight of just under 5K and a GVWR of 7K.

If that trailer's GVWR is indeed 7000 lbs you should be OK with either.? ?The Expedition has a nominal rating of 8950 lbs, the F-150 has a RWD/4WD rating of 9500/9200 lbs.? with an automatic and a TT.? ? Even with the 20% mountain west safety factor, that puts you at 7160 lbs for the Expedition and 7360 lbs with the 4WD F-150.

Enjoy.? ?;D
 

RogerW

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Thanks guys, it seems like they would be pretty comparable. My problem is making myself believe that a nice SUV can pull the same as or more than a truck...lol...I have always owned trucks except for one brief year. I find myself needing the seating more now that I have three granddaughters. They don't fit well in the supercab I have now. I have a better deal on the Expy so that is probably the way I will go if the towing is only marginally different
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I think the Expedition is on a truck chassis anyway - quite possible the same one as the F150. That's not a heavy duty chassis like the Ford Superduty's use, but capable enough for your Zeppelin.
 

RogerW

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Thanks Gary, I often see conversations about tongue weight. How do I calculate that?
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Tongue weight on a conventional travel trailer needs to be about 15% of the actual trailer weight. We generally estimate it based on the trailer GVWR, since most trailers end up close to their GVWR when loaded for the road.  If you assume your tow vehicle has to carry the full 15% of trailer GVWR, you kwill now you will have enough weight carrying capacity for the worst case scenario.
 

Carl L

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RogerW said:
Thanks Gary, I often see conversations about tongue weight. How do I calculate that?
 

Actually you measure it with scales.    It can be scaled directly or as a part of the weighing of the entire trailer.

Any way is is measured, it should be between 10% and 15% of the trailers weight as loaded.  The lower limit is critical -- a tongue weight that is too light can destabilize a trailer.
 

RogerW

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Thanks again fellas, I have a weigh station about 1.5 miles from my house, do you think they could weigh the rig for me?

Thanks, Roger
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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If you mean a roadside weight check area operated ny the state or federal DOT, the answer is generally No.  However, Oregon leaves their scales turned on when the weigh station is closed, so you can drive thru and check your weight.

You can get weighed at many truck stops. Cat Scales is one major chain of truck stop scales - see Cat Scales for a location near you. Local moving van companies often have scales and so do grain elevators, bulk feed stores and sand/gravel companies.
 
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