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kortniz

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Mar 13, 2019
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Sacramento, CA
[size=10pt][size=8pt]Hi Everyone! My name is Kortni and I'm completely new to RV Land. I just purchased a 1995 Champion 27' Camping Trailer and it's scored 8/10. The trouble I'm having is my truck is lifted. When you measure from the ground to the top of my bed at the rear axle, it measures 60 inches. I need to get my trailer to be towable. So here the journey begins.  Anyone have any ideas of the safest way to raise it?
 

Gizmo100

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Welcome to the RV forum kortniz

Not sure how to best advise you. Just to make a few thing clear are we talking 5th wheel RV? Or a Travel trailer?

 

Gary RV_Wizard

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If the Champion is a 5W, the only option besides lowering the truck is raising the trailer on its axles.  On most such, a few inches of height can be gained by "flipping" the axles, putting the springs on top of the axle rather than underneath.  This article explains it further:

http://www.doityourselfrv.com/axle-flipping-guide-flip-axles-trailer-ground-clearance-better-boondocking/

But that may not be enough to get the height you need. Furthermore, raising the trailer that far will make it dangerously top-heavy.


I suggest you SERIOUSLY consider lowering your truck substantially. Most pick-ups are tall even at factory height.
 

donn

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Raised trucks and towing do not make nice together.  You would be far better off putting the truck back to srock height.  All your going to do is make a terribly unstable combination.  Your next big issue is after lifting your truck you more than likely reduced your load carrying capacity tremendiously. 
 

Back2PA

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Welcome to the forum.

I just went out and measured my truck bed height because I was curious as to just how lifted your truck is. My truck has stock suspension but with 4WD is tall for a stock truck. Add to that the oversize tires and I'm a couple inches taller than a completely stock truck of my year - and I'm at 34" bed height, over two feet shorter than your truck.

I presume your trailer is a fifth wheel, the reason you mention bed height (if you were talking about a tow behind I imagine you'd be asking about hitch height). If you do have a pull behind, you can use a drop hitch, although you are talking about a significant drop so the hitch will likely have to be custom fabricated. If your Champion is a fifth wheel, I'll go so far as to say it can't be towed behind a substantially lifted truck such as yours. Apart from the safety issues mentioned by others, there would be the sheer height of the trailer if you lifted it enough to tow. While a 90s fifth wheel isn't as tall as a newer one, raising one two feet is likely to create overheight issues.
 

edjunior

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Roman Forest, TX.
Welcome.  Some pictures would be great, of both the truck and the trailer.  But I fear what everyone above said, with a lifted truck, this may not work out for you.  But please post some pictures so everyone can get a better idea of just what you have.
 

kortniz

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Sacramento, CA
We did the flip and think we need to lift it 4 more inches??
 

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kortniz

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I thought I posted the other pictures. Here is the truck and Trailer side by side. I think I need at least 5 more inches. Sorry, I'm still getting used to the forum.  :eek:
 

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Back2PA

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With the trailer not hooked up but level, with the axles now flipped what is the height to the tallest point (air conditioner, etc)?
 

Back2PA

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Two other measurements: the top of the bed rail of your truck, and the bottom of the raised portion of the trailer (the body next to where the kingpin is mounted).
 

donn

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I`ll just repeat myself.  Put the truck back to stock height.  Lifting the trailer so far off the ground is going to make for a horribly unstable combination.  Add the basic fact lift kits generally reduce truck load carrying capacity down a lot making them unsuitable for towing fifth wheels.  Remember your going to be dumping approx 20% of the trailers total weight directly over the rear axle.  Are you sure the trucks suspension is still capable of handling the load?
 

donn

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kortniz said:
It's a 2009 Dodge 2500 Cummins with air bags and electric brakes. Should be good.

That only means your truck as it came from the factory rated at 9900GVWR.  Which means you had a net cargo carrying capacity around 1800 pounds.  How much does the trailer weigh?  Load 2000 pounds in the bed directly over the rear axle and go to the scales.
 

Back2PA

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donn said:
Load 2000 pounds in the bed directly over the rear axle and go to the scales.

The best way to know what your cargo capacity is to look at the yellow and white sticker in the driver's door frame. That number is specific to your truck. It is a good idea to weigh the truck, empty, the front and rear axles separately. This way you really know where you stand with regard to cargo carrying capacity, which translates into how heavy of a fifth wheel can you tow. Fifth wheels put 15-20% of their weight on the fifth wheel hitch and this is where many trucks come up short - they have the towing capacity, but not the cargo capacity to take the weight in the bed.

But the real question is whether you can tow this trailer at all based on the lifted truck. I've attached a picture showing the measurements I mentioned earlier which are required to see where you stand. It appears in the picture that the fifth wheel is nose up; before you take any measurements you need to be sure that it's level or the measurements will not be correct.
 

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